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  #31  
Old 05-08-2002, 10:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr T Non-Fan
Instead of marching in and resigning once you've decided to accept an offer, I suggest gathering your requests, writing them down, and handing them in to your supervisor.
I did this. I wrote a letter documenting my accomplishments over the previous year and the reasons why I should be promoted (I was supervising people two pay grades above me). My boss turned me down flat, "Your experience at this time does not merit a promotion to that grade." Just about a month later, I was offered a job (unsolicited, by someone who had supervised me in the past). I turned in my resignation letter, and two hours later there was a counteroffer on my desk, including a promotion and $20K raise.
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  #32  
Old 05-08-2002, 10:33 AM
42 42 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cynic
What if it's not about raises or promotions. What if the counter-offer is "I'll give you more challenging works instead of the crappy ones I'm giving you now"? Not that I'd stay in a situation like this, but just asking for information.
That could be a totally different situation. It could depend on the following:
  1. I'm assuming that a change in assignments is what you were looking for. If not, thank your boss for the counteroffer, but then leave.
  2. Had you previously made it known that you were unhappy with your assignments? If not, don't be too hard on the boss - he may not have known.
  3. Were the assignments that you were given so bad that any boss should have known you'd be unhappy with them? If so, it negates the previous point.
  4. Was there somebody else who could have taken the assignments you had been given (and who might have actually enjoyed them)? If not, you might want to cut the boss some slack. He's dealing with a difficult situation, and he's telling you that he's willing to change things to get you to stay. (But find out how he's going to get your former assignments done so that they don't creep back onto your desk.)
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  #33  
Old 05-08-2002, 12:40 PM
Packet_Storm Packet_Storm is offline
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Default Counter offers?

What is wrong with counter offers, I know of people whom used getting another job as a ploy to get a counter-offer and moved up.

Acutally it was the best way to get a nice deal at my former job, doing telephone tech support third party (IT ****** TERRIBLE).

The only thing I could think of is if you accept a counter-offer, then it looks like you were after money, and why did you just ask for it.

oh, could some one P.M. me some good sites that deal with actuary matter, I am looking for like Times dela Acutary.
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  #34  
Old 05-08-2002, 11:30 PM
Checkin' Answers Checkin'  Answers is offline
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Here's my 2 cents on counter-offers. (Some of you are aware that I'm not the actuarial biz anymore. This is based on what I've seen in my wife's field in the food industry.)

When you go to a new company, your loyalty to that company is unquestioned. Nobody cares about your old company, because they want you working at the new one. By seeking out and accepting employment elsewhere, you are keeping your word to your new firm, and to your old one (assuming you didn't agree to a lifetime contract).

If you accept a counter-offer from your present employer, all you've done is prove that oral (or written) agreements don't mean jack squat to you. You're willing to ignore what you said yesterday for a few more bucks (or other considerations) today. You have succeeded in pissing off the firm whose offer you've accepted originally. It's unlikely you'll be trusted at a high level in your current firm.

If they really can't live without you, let them experience that first-hand for 6 months or a year. THEN, you can entertain thoughts of returning to the original firm.
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  #35  
Old 05-08-2002, 11:35 PM
Checkin' Answers Checkin'  Answers is offline
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Here's another trick you could use.

Last year, my wife had to travel to Minneapolis for personal reasons 2 times in 3 weeks. Her firm suspected that she was interviewing during these trips, and gave her an unsolicited raise and promotion. In fact, no interview was scheduled, or even entertained.

So, try scheduling some short random vacations. Make sure both trips are only for a day or two, and to the same location. Let everyone at work know what city you'll be in, but don't tell them why you're going. :P
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  #36  
Old 05-09-2002, 10:28 AM
42 42 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Checkin' Answers
If you accept a counter-offer from your present employer, all you've done is prove that oral (or written) agreements don't mean jack squat to you. You're willing to ignore what you said yesterday for a few more bucks (or other considerations) today. You have succeeded in pissing off the firm whose offer you've accepted originally.
I can attest to this. It bothers me when I go to all the trouble of seriously interviewing somebody and making them an offer only to find that I've been used as a pawn in some game with their current company.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Checkin' Answers
So, try scheduling some short random vacations. Make sure both trips are only for a day or two, and to the same location. Let everyone at work know what city you'll be in, but don't tell them why you're going.
Very sneaky, CA. Our Marketing department would like to offer you a job.
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  #37  
Old 05-09-2002, 10:40 AM
urysohn
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Checkin' Answers
So, try scheduling some short random vacations. Make sure both trips are only for a day or two, and to the same location. Let everyone at work know what city you'll be in, but don't tell them why you're going. :P
Forget about scheduled vacations. Make it on short notice and take off one day. Midweek. Give "personal reasons" as the reason and don't explain it any further. Except to assure them that everybody's fine, it's really no big deal. And look kind of embarassed to be talking about it
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