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  #51  
Old 11-08-2013, 11:53 AM
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GreenPea GreenPea is offline
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The best reward credit card I ever have is Bank of America Cash Reward. Most people have 1/2/3 on selected categories but mine is 2% flat on everything. BoA also gives me another 25% bonus if I redeem reward over $300 each time. That is effectively 2.5% cash back. I redeem rewards at least twice a year with great help from Mrs. GreenPea.

The second winner goes to Amex Costco. We spend enough money at Costco and it is no brainer to upgrade to executive membership. It is also our default card for 3%back on gasoline.

I pay $150 annual fee on Amex Delta Platinum. Upon renewal each year, I receive a free companion ticket voucher for any domestic travel as well as free checked bags. I have used the voucher twice and it does not seem to have many restrictions nor blackout dates.

For international travel, I use Chase Marriott which does not charge foreign currency conversion. While it carries an annual fee, I get one free night at Courtyard or Fairfield depending on the location.

Mrs. GreenPea keeps Macy's, TJM and BR just to use their coupons.

Last year Chase had 50k reward points for new Sapphire card members. The reward points is good for $500 cash back. My Amex Costco card has the same 1/2/3 reward without annual fee. So the GreenPea family cancelled the cards once we got $1000. Thank you Chase Bank!
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  #52  
Old 11-08-2013, 12:16 PM
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Two cards:

Amazon.com Chase Visa: Used for amazon purchases and places that don't accept AmEx (cough, my rent)... 3%/1% back, linked to my amazon account, can redeem points anytime and automatically on purchases. I love when family members ask to use my Prime shipping on big-ticket times. Sure!

*Side-note on Prime shipping: I get the reduced rate for my .edu address being active still. Comes with their streaming video service.

Fidelity Amex: Everything else. 2% flat. No fee. Can redeem $50 at a time directly to my Fidelity account as cash.

Can anyone recommend a good non-AmEx to charge my rent to?
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  #53  
Old 11-16-2013, 03:19 AM
iWillNguyen iWillNguyen is offline
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Got 10k to invest. Need ideas. Was thinking about dumping it in JCP since it appears to be slowly rebounding. Or maybe Tesla. It seems to be sticking at 140ish. Maybe it'll get back to it's all-time-high much like Neflix did last/this year.
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  #54  
Old 11-16-2013, 10:34 AM
nonlnear nonlnear is offline
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Originally Posted by iWillNguyen View Post
Got 10k to invest. Need ideas. Was thinking about dumping it in JCP since it appears to be slowly rebounding. Or maybe Tesla. It seems to be sticking at 140ish. Maybe it'll get back to it's all-time-high much like Neflix did last/this year.
What does this mean? What does your portfolio look like, and what are your goals? Is this a real investment, or do you honestly just want to play stock-picking roulette to get that warm and fuzzy feeling without a trip to a casino?
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  #55  
Old 11-16-2013, 10:56 AM
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What does this mean? What does your portfolio look like, and what are your goals? Is this a real investment, or do you honestly just want to play stock-picking roulette to get that warm and fuzzy feeling without a trip to a casino?


I will never understand why people who have more to invest than they usually do don't just increase their investments that month into index funds according to their AA.
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  #56  
Old 11-16-2013, 08:57 PM
iWillNguyen iWillNguyen is offline
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What does this mean? What does your portfolio look like, and what are your goals? Is this a real investment, or do you honestly just want to play stock-picking roulette to get that warm and fuzzy feeling without a trip to a casino?
Right now I got 50k in SPY, 5k in JCP and 0.5k in ARO.. got a 10% return in SPY right now (little late to the party, invest 25k at end of April and 25k at end of May), JCP I'm -25% right now (bought at $12) but it's going up (was at -45% a few weeks ago). I just want to get some kind of return > 0. I'm a little afraid to throw money in the market b/c it's at an all time high, but I'm already in it, so if I was really scared, shouldn't I be selling now? Goals are to make money without doing anything (or other peoples hard work) so I can be rich someday.
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  #57  
Old 11-16-2013, 09:06 PM
nonlnear nonlnear is offline
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Originally Posted by iWillNguyen View Post
Right now I got 50k in SPY, 5k in JCP and 0.5k in ARO.. got a 10% return in SPY right now (little late to the party, invest 25k at end of April and 25k at end of May), JCP I'm -25% right now (bought at $12) but it's going up (was at -45% a few weeks ago). I just want to get some kind of return > 0. I'm a little afraid to throw money in the market b/c it's at an all time high, but I'm already in it, so if I was really scared, shouldn't I be selling now? Goals are to make money without doing anything (or other peoples hard work) so I can be rich someday.
If all you want is a non-negative return I have to ask if you are debt-free? And if you just want a return that's >0, then why would you look for a single stock? That's close to maximizing your likelihood of a negative return.

And what does being scared have to do with whether you would be selling? Make your emotions your bitch.
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  #58  
Old 11-16-2013, 09:16 PM
iWillNguyen iWillNguyen is offline
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If all you want is a non-negative return I have to ask if you are debt-free? And if you just want a return that's >0, then why would you look for a single stock? That's close to maximizing your likelihood of a negative return.

And what does being scared have to do with whether you would be selling? Make your emotions your bitch.
Well let me rephrase it, I wasn't really clear what I wanted. I'm hoping to find a struggling stock (in 2013) and will likely rebound and have a big return in 2014. For example, check out BBY this time last year compared to where it's at today. Same with Netflix. My project right now in JCP. It's been declining since middle of 2012. It won't decline forever and my guess is by end of 2014, it'll rebound back up to maybe $20 or so. Keep in mind I know nothing about stocks, how the market works and why things go up/down. My only experience is doing 3 years worth of medical trend forecasting and seeing trends go down and telling people they can't stay this way forever.
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  #59  
Old 11-16-2013, 09:36 PM
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Colymbosathon ecplecticos Colymbosathon ecplecticos is offline
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Originally Posted by iWillNguyen View Post
Well let me rephrase it, I wasn't really clear what I wanted. I'm hoping to find a struggling stock (in 2013) and will likely rebound and have a big return in 2014. For example, check out BBY this time last year compared to where it's at today. Same with Netflix. My project right now in JCP. It's been declining since middle of 2012. It won't decline forever and my guess is by end of 2014, it'll rebound back up to maybe $20 or so. Keep in mind I know nothing about stocks, how the market works and why things go up/down. My only experience is doing 3 years worth of medical trend forecasting and seeing trends go down and telling people they can't stay this way forever.
Patients die; stocks go to zero.
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  #60  
Old 11-16-2013, 10:21 PM
nonlnear nonlnear is offline
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Originally Posted by iWillNguyen View Post
Well let me rephrase it, I wasn't really clear what I wanted. I'm hoping to find a struggling stock (in 2013) and will likely rebound and have a big return in 2014. For example, check out BBY this time last year compared to where it's at today. Same with Netflix. My project right now in JCP. It's been declining since middle of 2012. It won't decline forever and my guess is by end of 2014, it'll rebound back up to maybe $20 or so. Keep in mind I know nothing about stocks, how the market works and why things go up/down. My only experience is doing 3 years worth of medical trend forecasting and seeing trends go down and telling people they can't stay this way forever.
Given that you are self-aware enough to admit you don't know anything about stocks, etc., and given that there is an asymmetry of information between ignorant investors and deeply knowledgeable ones (sometimes with inside knowledge), a better play than anything you have suggested would be to do the exact opposite of everything you think you should do. (That's not your best play, but it's most likely better.) After all, with your current level of knowledge, you are the textbook "dumb money". That's not a bad thing, as long as you act appropriately wiht this nugget of knowledge.

“By periodically investing in an index fund, for example, the know-nothing investor can actually outperform most investment professionals. Paradoxically, when ‘dumb’ money acknowledges its limitations, it ceases to be dumb.”
- Warren Buffett, 1993 Berkshire Hathaway Shareholder Letter
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