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  #21  
Old 01-24-2014, 02:33 PM
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Originally Posted by whoanonstop View Post
Plus, if you extend this to the GRE, you'll see a lot of internationals score high on verbal even though they can barely speak English.

-Riley
1) From the test data I've seen, internationals do horrible on the verbal GRE. You're talking about a few exceptions.

2) To the extent that I've seen very strong performance in verbal among internationals, it's far more prevalent from India than China, as the english education is better there (and the data from test providers support that statement).

3) A GRE verbal score isn't a good measure of your conversational ability. But it can be a pretty damn good measure of verbal/grammar/written ability, especially if you make an adjustment for whether it's the individual's first or second language. Ie: 800 verbal GRE for a chinese guy may not have the writing/verbal skills as a 750 verbal GRE american, but you can be damn sure that the 800 verbal GRE chinese guy will have greater verbal skills than the 500-600 verbal GRE chinese guy, which is much more of the norm for chinese entering the actuarial profession.

4) The verbal score + writing score + debate team suggests that his person has strong potential for upper management. He may be lazy, per his GPA, but a math major at Duke or NYU is not easy, especially if you're taking courses like real analysis.
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  #22  
Old 01-24-2014, 02:50 PM
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Originally Posted by Ke$ha View Post
1) From the test data I've seen, internationals do horrible on the verbal GRE. You're talking about a few exceptions.
You're right. I am talking about the exceptions that score well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ke$ha View Post
2) To the extent that I've seen very strong performance in verbal among internationals, it's far more prevalent from India than China, as the english education is better there (and the data from test providers support that statement).
I'll respond with how you usually respond to people, but add in a link of data as well. Wrong.

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Originally Posted by Ke$ha View Post
3) A GRE verbal score isn't a good measure of your conversational ability. But it can be a pretty damn good measure of verbal/grammar/written ability, especially if you make an adjustment for whether it's the individual's first or second language. Ie: 800 verbal GRE for a chinese guy may not have the writing/verbal skills as a 750 verbal GRE american, but you can be damn sure that the 800 verbal GRE chinese guy will have greater verbal skills than the 500-600 verbal GRE chinese guy, which is much more of the norm for chinese entering the actuarial profession.
You could rank Chinese guys on ability to play basketball on a scale of 200-800. Although 800 is a better basketball player than 600, it still doesn't mean the 800 person could play for the NBA. How do you value an 800 verbal international student vs a 600 verbal domestic student?

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4) The verbal score + writing score + debate team suggests that his person has strong potential for upper management. He may be lazy, per his GPA, but a math major at Duke or NYU is not easy, especially if you're taking courses like real analysis.
Why is he automatically a Duke or NYU student? Even if he is, I think it's silly to evaluate someone by SAT scores over actuarial exams for an actuarial position.

-Riley
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  #23  
Old 01-24-2014, 03:26 PM
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There are plenty of places that aren't po where you can become an actuary, like Des Moines.
It's been 2 hours and not even an RN from you guys? Come on
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Don't you even think about sending me your resume. I'll turn it into an origami boulder and return it to you.
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  #24  
Old 01-24-2014, 03:33 PM
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I think your resume is fine. I didn't read your cover letter, but I think it could be a paragraph shorter.

If you went to Duke or Chapel Hill, I'd put them above exams. If you went anywhere else, then I'd put exams first.



Keep the SAT scores (But where'd the 50 points in math go? :P )....


You should apply to places in Charlotte . You'll have a lot of name recognition there.
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Last edited by ShivamS; 01-24-2014 at 03:39 PM..
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  #25  
Old 01-24-2014, 03:51 PM
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It's been 2 hours and not even an RN from you guys? Come on
You come in here after being gone for days and just start throwing around R's? NO!

btw, grats on 20k.
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  #26  
Old 01-24-2014, 04:50 PM
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Exams first, of course.

The varying bullets look whack. You don't need the multiple levels of bullets. One will look better everywhere, will move a lot of the text more toward the left, and might even give the resume a more open look.

I'd move the B.A. to a separate line and get rid of the classes.

Your bullets all either put a focus on tasks or little stuff - prepared, leveraged, utilized, incorporated, wrote. Results are best, bigger picture is good, making the focus "I used Excel" or "I used R" isn't good.

So, "Leveraged" is a bad start to a bullet. It's a bad word to include in any bullet not explicitly talking about investing (and, no, people capital doesn't count). It's not clear what you really mean in this context. And what's important is what you did, not the leveraging.

Same with "Utilized ...". Also, if you keep it, "used" means the same as "utilized" and is easier to read.

"that was distributed internally within the actuarial department" doesn't seem like a big deal.
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  #27  
Old 01-24-2014, 04:56 PM
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Tools are simply a way to do something. They should not be front and center.

Quote:
o Set July 2012 unpaid claims liability using Excel
o Developed a generalized linear model that predicts group retention rates conditional on a premium change in R
is much better than

Quote:
o Leveraged Excel to perform setting of July 2012 unpaid claims liability
o Utilized R to develop a generalized linear model that predicts group retention rates conditional on a premium change
but not as good as

Quote:
o Set July 2012 unpaid claims liability
o Developed a generalized linear model that predicts group retention rates conditional on a premium change
Maybe we don't use R here, but we do GLM. You're already telling me you know R somewhere else. If I care, I'll ask.
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  #28  
Old 01-24-2014, 05:03 PM
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Cover letter is way too long and dense.

"actively involved in everyday duties" is lame. Be more active, not "responsiblities include". You're way better off focusing on results and, if you focus on that, you don't really even need to mention those duties that you spent most of your time doing. Seriously. So you can get rid of the whole 1st half of the 2nd paragraph and just focus on the last half. When you do that, don't talk about is as an "in addition" or latitude or whatever. The count of projects doesn't matter and how little of your time they took is irrelevant if you write it as results.

I'd get rid of the course load thing. If you keep it, heavily-quantitative should be hyphenated. We will think the coursework = problem-solving (which also ought to be hyphenated) ability thing is naive or BS. Probably naive. Focus on the better stuff, get rid of the rest.

You really don't need a paragraph with hype to say you passed 4 exams. The wording of that is awkward. Why did you lengthen it by saying "the following exams" when you could just have listed them. I'd also say "Exams" to avoid having to repeat Exam and make it easier to read.

Fostering your development isn't really what's most important to the reader and I'd get rid of that. You can skip mentioning the resume and you don't need to mention references.

What's the writing sample?
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  #29  
Old 01-24-2014, 05:29 PM
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Originally Posted by Ke$ha View Post
The SAT scores are a big plus for his resume. The math score is average among actuaries, but the verbal and writing scores are significantly above average.
Really? My SAT verbal/writing scores are in that range too, but I don't make anything of it. I didn't even think to put my SAT scores on my resume when I was looking for an internship. I assume that people who are smart enough to do well on the math section are also smart enough to do well on the other sections (assuming that English is their first language). Perhaps it is a bad assumption.
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  #30  
Old 01-24-2014, 05:34 PM
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Originally Posted by FutureStatistician View Post
Really? My SAT verbal/writing scores are in that range too, but I don't make anything of it. I didn't even think to put my SAT scores on my resume when I was looking for an internship. I assume that people who are smart enough to do well on the math section are also smart enough to do well on the other sections (assuming that English is their first language). Perhaps it is a bad assumption.
What percentage of Asians are in actuarial science? It's a terrible assumption . But, doesn't look like it came back to bite you. So who cares.

Plenty of native speakers don't do well on the CR and Writing sections, btw. But I bet those are the same ones who don't do well on the math section either?
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