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  #11  
Old 07-16-2013, 09:17 PM
cmind cmind is offline
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Because nonlnear says it's not real calculus
What's "real" calculus? Analysis? Analysis has a place, but it's a very very small place...
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  #12  
Old 07-16-2013, 09:28 PM
StudyingIsFun StudyingIsFun is offline
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Buy an exam P manual. Teach yourself.
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  #13  
Old 07-16-2013, 09:33 PM
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FactuarialStatement FactuarialStatement is offline
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Stewart Calculus ftw.
Then probability from a manual.
But IMO you won't get a job going this route unless you 'know somebody' - you will be lacking the signal of a rigorous degree on your resume. If you are really set on it, then go back for 2 yrs and get a B.S. I did it with high school algebra while working full time.
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  #14  
Old 07-16-2013, 10:13 PM
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Because nonlnear says it's not real calculus
THAT'S BECAUSE IT'S NOT REAL CALCULUS!

JK it is but it's not as formal as a real book. Not that I've seen a more formal calculus book but I do know that part 1 of the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus isn't stated in Stewart and the whole book in general isn't very formal. So I'll assume there's better
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  #15  
Old 07-16-2013, 10:59 PM
AB89 AB89 is offline
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Originally Posted by Kaner3339 View Post
THAT'S BECAUSE IT'S NOT REAL CALCULUS!

JK it is but it's not as formal as a real book. Not that I've seen a more formal calculus book but I do know that part 1 of the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus isn't stated in Stewart and the whole book in general isn't very formal. So I'll assume there's better
Are you sure about that?

Having taught various Calculus classes for around 5 years, I can say Stewart is much better than the other textbooks I've seen used (it may not be the best book in the world, but it is one of the better ones). Sure most of the proofs are pretty handwavy, but who cares? College freshmen aren't going to be able to work through a legit real analysis book (assuming they haven't taken Calculus in high school or whatever), and even if they can get through, say, Rudin instead of Stewart, they'll be able to prove Dini's theorem but unable to integrate arctanx.

Plus, Stewart has plenty of interesting exercises that give some exposure to more advanced math topics.
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  #16  
Old 07-16-2013, 11:02 PM
Squirrelious Squirrelious is offline
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Thank you your replies, I really appreciate the suggestions and advice.

I picked up a Stewart book when I took Calc I to supplement that class's odd, proprietary book. It seemed alright. Why would people yell?
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  #17  
Old 07-16-2013, 11:08 PM
Squirrelious Squirrelious is offline
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Heh, didn't refresh my browser for a while and missed the explanation.


As for degree, I have a B.S. it's in nursing. Why the career change? I'm not that fond of vomitus, excrement, or hospital smells.

I figure that more math will be entertaining, at the very least.

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  #18  
Old 07-17-2013, 07:10 AM
clarinetist clarinetist is offline
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Originally Posted by AB89 View Post
Are you sure about that?

Having taught various Calculus classes for around 5 years, I can say Stewart is much better than the other textbooks I've seen used (it may not be the best book in the world, but it is one of the better ones). Sure most of the proofs are pretty handwavy, but who cares? College freshmen aren't going to be able to work through a legit real analysis book (assuming they haven't taken Calculus in high school or whatever), and even if they can get through, say, Rudin instead of Stewart, they'll be able to prove Dini's theorem but unable to integrate arctanx.

Plus, Stewart has plenty of interesting exercises that give some exposure to more advanced math topics.
I've tutored Calculus now for about 4 years, and the university I attend recently switched from Smith/Minton to Stewart, which was an amazing decision on the math department's part. I thought Thomas was the best Calculus book out there, but Stewart is the best I've seen so far.

Rigor is not something to be developed in a Calculus course. Most of it should be saved for the Real Analysis students after getting through a few introductory proof courses (like Linear Algebra). For example, as much as I love doing - proofs and mathematical induction, what bugs me about teaching these topics to Calc. I students is that most students don't actually understand what it is they are doing, and are just memorizing a process to solve a problem, plus, Calc. I students typically do not know how to write proofs.
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  #19  
Old 07-17-2013, 08:16 AM
BanDodger BanDodger is offline
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Originally Posted by StudyingIsFun View Post
Buy an exam P manual. Teach yourself.
Need to learn how to do integrals first...
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  #20  
Old 07-17-2013, 08:23 AM
nonlnear nonlnear is offline
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Originally Posted by cmind View Post
Why would someone yell at you??

Stewart's first year calc text is easily the best math textbook I've ever read. Most of my math maturity comes from the things I learned directly from that book. And it covers pretty much all the general math you would ever need in a statistics field.
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Because nonlnear says it's not real calculus
Ouch.

Stewart is a well designed book for its purpose, which is training people looking to learn about calculus for purposes other than creating mathematics. I hope that anything negative I said about Stewart was looking at its value in training mathematicians. For some reason there is an undercurrent that sucks a lot of threads in that direction. Stewart is useless for training mathematicians. That sounds like a pretty biting criticism of a math book, but it's really not.
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