Actuarial Outpost
 
Go Back   Actuarial Outpost > Actuarial Discussion Forum > Careers - Employment
FlashChat Actuarial Discussion Preliminary Exams CAS/SOA Exams Cyberchat Around the World Suggestions


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #31  
Old 07-17-2013, 11:47 AM
Abnormal Abnormal is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Posts: 6,725
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by cmind View Post
Stewart's first year calc text is easily the best math textbook I've ever read. Most of my math maturity comes from the things I learned directly from that book. And it covers pretty much all the general math you would ever need in a statistics field.
.
Quote:
The house that math built
James Stewart made his money on calculus textbooks and built a five-storey sanctuary in Rosedale.


James Stewart is a calculus rock star.

When he goes on book tours in China, they ask for his autograph. In Toronto, the city’s movers and shakers gather at his home for concerts. People have drunkenly stumbled into his infinity pool.

Stewart’s 18,000-square-foot home, named Integral House, is an architectural marvel. It has five floors, a concert space and a stairwell ensconced in handblown blue glass, his favourite colour. The house is filled with gadgets. Stewart delights in showing them off, including the wall to wall blinds that block out the sun with a push of a button in his treetop bedroom.

“I don’t like to wake up too early,” he says.

Rosedale is a neighbourhood of riches, but Stewart’s are of a peculiar design. In 1987 he published his first calculus text book. Today, 90 per cent of Canadian university students use his books, and 70 per cent of U.S. students do the same. The bestselling books have been translated into 12 languages. He’s a bit like John Grisham, if Grisham knew how to write good sigma notation.

“I would not have predicted it,” says the fair-haired Stewart, ever the mathematician.

MORE>
__________________
Anyone who cannot cope with mathematics is not fully human. At best he is a tolerable subhuman who has learned to wear shoes, bathe, and not make messes in the house.
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 07-17-2013, 11:49 AM
Colonel Smoothie's Avatar
Colonel Smoothie Colonel Smoothie is offline
Member
CAS
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
College: Jamba Juice University
Favorite beer: AO Amber Ale
Posts: 48,129
Default

Canadians, amirite?
__________________
Recommended Readings for the EL Actuary || Recommended Readings for the EB Actuary

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wigmeister General View Post
Don't you even think about sending me your resume. I'll turn it into an origami boulder and return it to you.
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 07-17-2013, 12:12 PM
Abnormal Abnormal is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Posts: 6,725
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Colonel Smoothie View Post
Canadians, amirite?
No idea about cmind but Jim was on my Ph.D. defense committee.
__________________
Anyone who cannot cope with mathematics is not fully human. At best he is a tolerable subhuman who has learned to wear shoes, bathe, and not make messes in the house.
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 07-17-2013, 12:18 PM
cmind cmind is offline
Member
SOA
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 1,312
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dukelampard View Post
This thread makes me miss my Real Analysis and Abstract Algebra classes. I felt so cool back then...
Those classes made me want to stab myself in the face.

EDIT: Yes, I'm also a Canuck. But I didn't know Stewart was Canadian until much later, so no patriotism intended.
__________________
P FM MLC MFE C

ECON FINANCE STATS

JOB
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 07-17-2013, 12:41 PM
Abnormal Abnormal is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Posts: 6,725
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by cmind View Post
But I didn't know Stewart was Canadian until much later, so no patriotism intended.
Obviously I knew Jim was Canadian - while the article I linked didn't reference it he was writing high school math texts while I was in grad school

http://www.maa.org/news/an-interview-with-james-stewart
__________________
Anyone who cannot cope with mathematics is not fully human. At best he is a tolerable subhuman who has learned to wear shoes, bathe, and not make messes in the house.
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 08-06-2013, 06:58 PM
Colonel Smoothie's Avatar
Colonel Smoothie Colonel Smoothie is offline
Member
CAS
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
College: Jamba Juice University
Favorite beer: AO Amber Ale
Posts: 48,129
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by nonlnear View Post
The mention of Bourbaki was a joke.
What's not to love about that?
(vBulletin [ tex ] seems to have its own quirks, so forgive the incorrect rendering of (*) )

But this isn't helping the OP very much.
http://www.actuarialoutpost.com/actu...d.php?t=264903

Quote:
From 1935, several mathematical textbooks appeared under the name of Nicolas Bourbaki, apparently a French mathematician, who also contributed to mathematical theory in various ways. ‘Bourbaki’ was in fact a collective pseudonym for a group of young French mathematicians who shared common interests. The group was officially known as the ‘Association of Collaborators of Nicolas Bourbaki’ [3].
OMG

you got me
__________________
Recommended Readings for the EL Actuary || Recommended Readings for the EB Actuary

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wigmeister General View Post
Don't you even think about sending me your resume. I'll turn it into an origami boulder and return it to you.
Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old 08-06-2013, 07:33 PM
Joshuary's Avatar
Joshuary Joshuary is offline
Member
CAS SOA
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Atlanta, GA
College: GSU Alumni
Posts: 73
Default

I am sure it has been said, but just to highlight my experience quickly:
  • A strong foundation in algebra is a must.
  • A strong foundation in calculus is important.
  • Get good at summing series.
  • A strong foundation in statistics is a must, but you will learn most of that when Studying for P/1 IMO.

Some basic rules in trig., and some basic calculus involving trig. has appeared on the preliminary exams P/1 before. This isn't as important/common yet so far in my experience, and an easily memorized solution anyways.

It wouldn't hurt taking corporate finance, macro and micro economics, and econometrics through an approved resource from the SOA. It will prevent you from taking additional exams as they are required for the VEE credits. All this is available on the SOA website. But Passing exams is often more important than passing VEE's in my experience.

Good luck! I switched from a career in the culinary arts 4 years ago, and I am almost there myself. It is a very competitive field at the entry level so far. You can do it, but you better love math and be/get good at tests. You should also be honest with yourself if you are willing to do a lot of studying for the next 4-12 years of your life.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
career change, math, study

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:08 AM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
*PLEASE NOTE: Posts are not checked for accuracy, and do not
represent the views of the Actuarial Outpost or its sponsors.
Page generated in 0.40428 seconds with 9 queries