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Old 05-17-2018, 06:43 PM
WhiteVeil WhiteVeil is offline
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Default Complaining About coworkers to their manager

Was wondering if this is commonplace or not.

To elaborate, there is one particular coworker. He's extremely smart (I think he's only failed one exam), a very good actuary, and fairly young (only maybe 3 years older than I am). Since he's attained credentials I've had to do work for him a decent bit of times in the last couple of years. He doesn't give any guidance or anything when assigning tasks, and his expectations are very high. I get the impression he expects everyone to be as smart and as good as he is. He doesn't have much (or any really) empathy for people.

In the past, I haven't had too many issues with him, but there was a new project recently that I didn't do as well a job. He had given me three days to do about 40+ hours worth of work (I put in a lot of overtime plus weekend time to meet his deadline), and it was right before an exam. I'd say I'd gotten it 80-85% correct or so, but he really let me have it on the mistakes that I'd made. While I agree that I should have caught some of them myself, there was only so much I could do in that short time. I didn't appreciate his tone or the manner in which he chewed me out, but I recognize my shortcomings and listened to what he said.

What bothers me is that he complained to my boss about how awful I was (without mentioning that he gave no guidance or the extremely tight deadline), and I think he did it even before he even talked to me about it. This is the second time this happened, as there was a time when I first started working and messed up an assignment early on, he made sure my boss knew about it. But he never tells my boss when I do good work. I shrugged it off the first time but now I'm getting concerned.

I don't know if he does this to everyone or just me. To me, it feels like maybe he just doesn't like me for whatever reason. With most others that I work with, if there are any issues they will tell me and usually don't report it to my manager unless specifically asked for input about me, or they'll be sure share both good and bad things. Thankfully, my boss didn't seem to be too upset and told me mistakes happen, but I still can't help but be bothered. I kind of want to ask this guy about it, but I feel like it would only make things worse.

TLDR;
Just wanted to know if this happens in most workplaces. Part of me feels that if he's so quick to tell my boss when I haven't done well, he should tell them when I've done good work too instead of only sharing the negatives. Or maybe I am just expecting too much and this behavior is very common?
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Old 05-17-2018, 06:59 PM
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I think it happens but it doesn't work in his favor if he keeps throwing you under the bus. It's not in his best interest to talk bad about his own teammate as you both need each other to achieve your boss's objectives. I wouldn't be surprised if this were the first time your coworker were given some level of responsibility over another coworker. It's pretty common for inexperienced managers (or soon-to-be-managers) to go on power trips only to realize that you being successful is in their best interest. I think many managers learn this, although some never will.
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Old 05-17-2018, 07:05 PM
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Also, if he's responsible for managing a project and the work he hands out to everyone causes them to work overtime while no one else in the company gets that workload, he's not managing the workload appropriately. If a manger gets too big of an ask given their resources, it's their job to push back and reduce the project scope to something more reasonable. It looks worse for him than you if the work doesn't get completed, although if this is his first slip up, you may be an unfortunate casualty if he's able to convince them it was your fault, before management gives him another chance and realizes it was actually his fault when he screws up again.

If you're overworked, you should bring it up with your boss. Of course, this depends on your own company culture. It would be inappropriate to complain about working 50 hours a week when the rest of your coworkers are working 60.
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Last edited by Colonel Smoothie; 05-17-2018 at 07:14 PM..
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Old 05-17-2018, 07:16 PM
Dr T Non-Fan Dr T Non-Fan is offline
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Should probably just tell your boss about this.

So, it's CS, isn't it? I heard he has no empathy.
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Old 05-17-2018, 07:45 PM
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Should probably just tell your boss about this.

So, it's CS, isn't it? I heard he has no empathy.
RN.
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Old 05-17-2018, 07:48 PM
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I agree with CS's posts. Also, if you aren't already, you should make your boss aware of work requests as you receive them, especially if they are large and/or unreasonable. In this case your boss would know ahead of time that you had a large project foisted upon you with little time to complete.
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Old 05-18-2018, 10:30 AM
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We have people that flew through exams and became managers in their 20s. Similar to your story, they are recognized as being very smart but also somewhat arrogant. While I have not worked directly for any of them, Ive been told they have very high expectations for quality/speed of work that can be overwhelming.

I have no advice, but wanted to let you know you are not alone in your frustrations.
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Old 05-18-2018, 10:52 AM
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We have people that flew through exams and became managers in their 20s. Similar to your story, they are recognized as being very smart but also somewhat arrogant. While I have not worked directly for any of them, Ive been told they have very high expectations for quality/speed of work that can be overwhelming.

I have no advice, but wanted to let you know you are not alone in your frustrations.
Do those high expectations come with high pay

Asking for a friend
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Old 05-18-2018, 11:17 AM
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Do those high expectations come with high pay

Asking for a friend
They are just expected to pass all their exams on the first try, so if they can just do that they will make more money right?
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Old 05-18-2018, 03:07 PM
Fracktuary Fracktuary is offline
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Does you actual boss know your work well ?

If so, I would imagine that they would be able to judge for them self.

I agree with previous posters that you should speak with someone in management if you feel like it is unfair. Best not to let these things linger.
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