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  #61  
Old 10-22-2015, 07:26 PM
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Looks like someone found an alternative to Daraprim for $1/day. Hoping that this is a bigger trend, but I'm staying cautiously skeptical for now.

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Imprimis Pharmaceuticals to Make Compounded and Customizable Formulation of Pyrimethamine and Leucovorin Available for Physicians to Prescribe for their Patients as an Alternative to Daraprimģ

Imprimis forms Imprimis Cares to help combat the high prices of sole source legacy generic drugs
Oct 22, 2015

SAN DIEGO, Oct. 22, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- Imprimis Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (NASDAQ: IMMY), a specialty pharmaceutical company focused on the development and commercialization of proprietary compounded drug therapies, today announced it has made available a customizable compounded formulation of pyrimethamine and leucovorin available for physicians to consider prescribing for their patients as a low cost alternative to Daraprimģ.

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Last month, Turing Pharmaceuticals LLC, the sole supplier of Daraprim, increased the price of this prescription drug from $13.50 per tablet to a reported $750.00 per tablet. The FDA-approved label for Daraprim indicates that it is prescribed for toxoplasmosis and other types of infections. Toxoplasmosis can be of major concern for patients with weakened immune systems such as patients with HIV/AIDS, pregnant women and children. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, pyrimethamine works to block folic acid synthesis in the parasite T. gondii, the cause of toxoplasmosis, and leucovorin helps to reverse the negative effects on bone marrow caused by this mechanism of action.

Imprimis is now offering customizable compounded formulations of pyrimethamine and leucovorin in oral capsules starting as low as $99.00 for a 100 count bottle, or at a cost of under a dollar per capsule. Compounded medications may be appropriate for prescription when a commercially-available medicine does not meet the specific needs of a patient. For ordering information, please visit www.imprimiscares.com.

Mark L. Baum, CEO of Imprimis stated, "It is indisputable that generic drug prices have soared recently. While we have seen an increase in costs associated with regulatory compliance, recent generic drug price increases have made us concerned and caused us to take positive action to address an opportunity to help a needy patient population. While we respect Turing's right to charge patients and insurance companies whatever it believes is appropriate, there may be more cost-effective compounded options for medications, such as Daraprim, for patients, physicians, insurance companies and pharmacy benefit managers to consider. This is not the first time a sole supply generic drug – especially one that has been approved for use as long as Daraprim – has had its price increased suddenly and to a level that may make it unaffordable. In response to this recent case and others that we will soon identify, Imprimis is forming a new program called Imprimis Cares which is aligned to our corporate mission of making novel and customizable medicines available to physicians and patients today at accessible prices."

Mr. Baum added, "Today, some drug prices are simply out of control and we believe we may be able to help control costs by offering compounded alternatives to several sole source legacy generic drugs. Imprimis Cares and its team of compounding pharmacists will work with physicians and their patients to ensure they have affordable access to the medicines they need from the over 7,800 generic FDA-approved drugs. Imprimis Cares, available in all 50 states, will work with all third party insurers, pharmacy benefit managers and buying groups to offer its patient specific customizable compounded drug formulations at prices that ensure accessibility and that provide a reasonable profit for Imprimis. We are here to serve our patients and their physicians. We believe that when we do a great job serving our customers, our shareholders will also benefit."

Imprimis' finished compounded drug formulations do not have an FDA-approval label for recommended use. Imprimis compounded formulations are not FDA approved and may only be prescribed pursuant to a physician prescription for an individually identified patient consistent with federal and state laws governing compounded drug formulations.
http://imprimispharma.investorroom.c...ve-to-Daraprim
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  #62  
Old 10-23-2015, 11:29 AM
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Originally Posted by ditkaworshipper View Post
Looks like someone found an alternative to Daraprim for $1/day. Hoping that this is a bigger trend, but I'm staying cautiously skeptical for now.



http://imprimispharma.investorroom.c...ve-to-Daraprim
So how does this work, the compounding? I think it takes a few days to get compounded drugs. So, could you buy like three pills of Daraprim to get you through until this arrives? Still costly, but would still save a ton. Hell, Express Scripts could just buy some and put it on the shelf (assuming decent shelf life) and overnight it as needed. Surely one doc will use it, at which point the ROI is really high.

This probably doesn't fully close the gap, it's not FDA indicated etc. It might even be kind of a publicity stunt by this manufacturer. Still, it's pretty cool. Kudos to these guys for doing something.
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  #63  
Old 10-26-2015, 12:16 AM
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The more you look at Valeant - the uglier it looks

Valeant and Pharmacy More Intertwined Than Thought

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The Valeant employees were placed at Philidor while the pharmacy was in its infancy, to provide help on “structures and processes,” said a Philidor spokeswoman. She said in a statement that the Valeant employees set up separate Philidor email accounts, under “clearly distinguishable names,” to keep “their internal Philidor communications separate from the Valeant communications, primarily to reduce the risk of incorrectly sharing either company’s proprietary information.”

Valeant, which is hosting an investor conference call on Monday at 8 a.m. EDT to explain its relationship with Philidor and its network of pharmacies, declined to comment.
...
Last week, a short-selling hedge fund accused Valeant of using the pharmacies in an accounting scheme to inflate revenue.

Valeant had generally kept mum on its relationship with Philidor before last week, because Valeant said it considered its use of such pharmacies as “one of our competitive advantages.”

Last week, Valeant said that it had an option to buy Philidor. Valeant also “categorically” denied the allegations made by the short seller and said it complies fully with all accounting rules.
...
Interviews with former employees, doctors who prescribe Valeant drugs and patients indicate that the ties between Valeant and Philidor are more interconnected than previously disclosed. The people gave details of how the companies worked together, with Valeant employees working directly in Philidor offices, sometimes using fictional names. The people said this was to conceal the ties so it didn’t appear Valeant was using the pharmacy to steer patients to the drug company’s products, which Philidor strongly denied.

The people described how Philidor made it easy for patients to get Valeant drugs, even if insurers balked at the high prices, shedding light on some of the complex efforts used by companies like Valeant to sell drugs that are expensive.
...
The pharmacies can steer patients to Valeant’s drugs, rather than less-expensive alternatives, and then help negotiate reimbursement with insurers, analysts say.

Nearly all of the prescriptions Philidor filled were for Valeant drugs like acne medicine Solodyn and toenail fungus treatment Jublia, the employees said. A month’s supply of Solodyn on Drugs.com costs $1,112.69, about 2Ĺ times more than generic versions, which have slightly different dosages.

Valeant has said Philidor doesn’t restrict the prescriptions it fills to Valeant.

Doctors who have prescribed Valeant medicines say the company made them well aware of the services provided by Philidor, including financial support available to patients. Three doctors said Valeant sales representatives dropped off brochures and coupons offering help paying for drug copays, and these materials directed patients to call a number for Philidor. The doctors would send prescriptions for Valeant drugs electronically to Philidor.
More shady information at the link - especially all the hoops they jumped through to hide the relationship between Valeant and Philidor.
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  #64  
Old 10-26-2015, 04:28 PM
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VRX finished down 5% today. This morning, before the market opened, they held a conference call to try and explain the relationship with distributors and they did a shitty job.

In Trying to Explain Itself, Valeant Muddies the Water

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Valeant Pharmaceuticals has further tangled its web. The acquisitive $39 billion company tried on Monday to explain its ties to drug distributors.

Analysts didnít ask ó and a 90-page presentation and call with investors didnít answer ó why it had obscured the dealings in the first place. The messy details only help confirm some fears about Valeant.

At issue most urgently is Philidor Rx Services, a company Valeant says it does not own or control. Even so, Valeant paid $100 million in 2014 for an option to buy the pharmacy for nothing over the next 10 years. Nearly all of Philidorís sales are of Valeantís drugs, and Valeant consolidates its financial figures. Valeant also has the right to approve important roles at Philidor.

The opaque structure is troubling. Whatís more, the situation is more byzantine than originally imagined. Philidor has the right to buy a pharmacy called Isolani, which owns the right to buy R&O Pharmacy. Such a camouflaged trail canít sit well with investors.

The lack of clarity also makes it hard to ignore reports by The Wall Street Journal that Valeant employees used alternate identities while stationed at Philidor, and an R&O founderís claims that Philidor and subsidiaries shipped drugs to states where they did not have a license.

Defenses offered by Valeantís chief executive, J. Michael Pearson, mostly ring hollow. He claims the company didnít bother disclosing the $100 million payment to buy Philidor because the matter was immaterial.
...
The Justice Department has issued a subpoena as part of an investigation into possible violations of federal health care rules by Bausch & Lomb, a Valeant subsidiary. Prosecutors in Massachusetts and New York have opened investigations into Valeantís patient-assistance programs. And the Federal Trade Commission is investigating the companyís acquisition of Paragon Holdings.
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  #65  
Old 10-26-2015, 07:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ditkaworshipper View Post
Looks like someone found an alternative to Daraprim for $1/day. Hoping that this is a bigger trend, but I'm staying cautiously skeptical for now.
If I recall... drug compounding is basically an FDA workaround. It's supposed to be a way for people who are allergic to the white powder or whatever to order a special pill made with some different white powder or whatever. You're not supposed to be brewing stuff in bulk, and you certainly aren't supposed to be making bulk facsimiles of FDA approved drugs. That's what the generic approval process is for.

I mean, it's awesome, of course, but only works because PHRMA has a 'kick-me' sign on its back right now.

Also might not fly if the drug still had a patent. I dunno.

Last edited by sweetiepie; 10-26-2015 at 07:35 PM..
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  #66  
Old 10-26-2015, 07:34 PM
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Glad to see these effers under fire, btw.

Hope we either regulate prices or deregulate trade.
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  #67  
Old 10-26-2015, 10:12 PM
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Even though I'm not religious, whenever I read stories about companies like these - or stories in the "Doctors with Questionable motives" thread - I can't help but think about monologue by Father Barry in "On the Waterfront."

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You want to know what is wrong with our waterfront? It is the love of a lousy buck. It's making the love of a buck, the cushy job, more important than the love of man. It's forgetting that every fella down here is your brother...
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  #68  
Old 10-29-2015, 09:02 AM
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There are rumors that Pfizer has approached Allergan about a merger. Should be great for drug prices, amirite?
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  #69  
Old 10-29-2015, 07:55 PM
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Express Scripts, CVS Cut Ties With Valeant Partner Philidor

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Originally Posted by Bloomberg
The two largest pharmacy-benefit managers said they’re moving to terminate Philidor RX Services, the mail-order pharmacy that’s a partner of drugmaker Valeant Pharmaceuticals International Inc., from their networks.

Express Scripts Holding Co., the nation’s largest manager of prescription drug benefits, said in a statement that it’s “in the process of terminating the Philidor pharmacy from our network.” It’s also evaluating four other pharmacies that Valeant has a similar relationship with.

The company also said it was reviewing and evaluating “all similar captive pharmacy arrangements,” referring to pharmacies that derive the vast majority of their prescription volume from one manufacturer or one product.

The second-largest drug benefits manager, CVS Health Corp., also said in an e-mailed statement that it would remove Philidor from its network of pharmacies after an audit of its practices.

“CVS/caremark maintains a broad national network of 68,000 pharmacies. In accordance with CVS/caremark’s standard auditing protocols, over the last several weeks we have been monitoring and reviewing the results of recent audits of Philidor’s practices. Based on the findings from those activities, we have terminated Philidor for noncompliance with the terms of its provider agreement,” CVS said in an e-mailed statement.
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  #70  
Old 10-29-2015, 08:54 PM
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Valeant closed down about 4.7% today and is currently down another 13.5% in after hours trading on the news of the PBMs cutting ties with Philidor
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