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  #41  
Old 02-05-2019, 10:49 PM
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I feel myself struggling with level 6 Adapt exams, I can pass level 5 with no issue, but there are problems I just get stuck on with my level 6 exams and they take so long kinda panicking now. I'm wondering if I should just continue hitting concepts with level 5 exams..
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  #42  
Old 02-05-2019, 10:59 PM
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From all my past exams, problems between level 4 - 6 adapt are usually the sweet spot
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  #43  
Old 02-07-2019, 12:41 AM
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Originally Posted by BelayMeMaybe View Post
Good luck! The topic distribution was very comparable to ADAPT. Obviously I can't go into detail, but read the Health and Ratemaking PDFs linked near the end of the STAM syllabus. My exam asked a question that was word-for-word answered within and that I didn't encounter in ADAPT.
Thanks a lot for sharing!
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  #44  
Old 02-07-2019, 09:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BelayMeMaybe View Post
Good luck! The topic distribution was very comparable to ADAPT. Obviously I can't go into detail, but read the Health and Ratemaking PDFs linked near the end of the STAM syllabus. My exam asked a question that was word-for-word answered within and that I didn't encounter in ADAPT.
Yeah, everyone needs to read that study note. I passed in the Fall, but I got a question that directly referenced this note. It's an freebie if you read!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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  #45  
Old 02-07-2019, 12:59 PM
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Which "note" are you referring to? The Supplement to Chapter 3 note or the Individual Health Insurance note? Or both?
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  #46  
Old 02-07-2019, 02:19 PM
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Which "note" are you referring to? The Supplement to Chapter 3 note or the Individual Health Insurance note? Or both?
I perceived it as both so I just read both lol.
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  #47  
Old 02-07-2019, 09:17 PM
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Default SOA Sample Q108

For the SOA sample problem #108, the solution stated that the distribution is (a,b,0) but since I did not see any definition of p(0) I assumed (a,b,1).

They had the answer being 0.09 (C) but my answer is 0.10 (D). Kindly clarify which answer is correct.
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  #48  
Old 02-07-2019, 09:28 PM
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The definition given is the definition of (a,b,0) (or equivalent to other definitions). (a,b,0) means the relationship between p(0) and p(1) can be expressed in the same form as the relationship between p(1) and p(2), and between p(k) and p(k+1). That same form applies whether you are defining p(k) in terms of p(k-1) (as here), for k=1,2,... or whether you choose to define p(k) in terms of p(k+1), for k=0, 1, 2,..., or p(k-1) in terms of p(k) for k=1,2,...
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  #49  
Old 02-07-2019, 09:37 PM
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The definition given is the definition of (a,b,0) (or equivalent to other definitions). (a,b,0) means the relationship between p(0) and p(1) can be expressed in the same form as the relationship between p(1) and p(2), and between p(k) and p(k+1). That same form applies whether you are defining p(k) in terms of p(k-1) (as here), for k=1,2,... or whether you choose to define p(k) in terms of p(k+1), for k=0, 1, 2,..., or p(k-1) in terms of p(k) for k=1,2,...
Ok. Got it.
So to clarify, if they had said k=2,3,... instead then either this is Truncated (assume p(0)=0) or Modified (p(0)=some p).
And because k starts at 1, which would make the provided recursion contain p(0) which would imply that p(0) can be determined in the regular form of whatever distribution imply (a,b,0).
Is that it?
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  #50  
Old 02-07-2019, 09:48 PM
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Yes. But I was focusing on the limits of the expression. The form does have to be right (as it is here).

So if it said (for example) that p(k) = ap(k-1)^2 + b, k=1,2,3,... that would not be (a,b,0) even though all the relationships would have the same form and the limits are OK. The form of the relationship would be wrong.
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