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  #31  
Old 07-29-2016, 08:32 AM
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If your OS or playing software can control the volume during playback, the digital stream is being altered before it reaches the Focusrite (except maybe if the volume is 100%).
When I'm recording in Sonar, output is directly to the Focusrite and system volume doesn't come into the equation at all.

Outside of Sonar, I always have system volume up to 100%, and I do all volume control with the Focusrite itself.

When I'm recording/mixing, at least, the only signal degradation is the D/A and A/D conversion - which all happens in the Focusrite, which has pretty decent converters.
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  #32  
Old 07-30-2016, 12:06 AM
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IH, is there any tech stuff you DON'T know?!?!
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  #33  
Old 07-30-2016, 09:15 AM
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IH, is there any tech stuff you DON'T know?!?!
There's a whole lot I don't know. I have a cousin who works as an electronics technician for concerts and conferences, and much of the stuff he knows or owns is way over my head.
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  #34  
Old 08-12-2016, 12:27 PM
George Frankly George Frankly is online now
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A friend of mine was selling a Seaton Submersive subwoofer and offered me a good price, so I jumped. It's not small, but much more manageable than the gargantuan Orbit Shifter. I will keep one and sell the other, I want to wait until we buy a house to see what kind of space I'm working with.

The Seaton has two 15" drivers in a sealed box. 2,400w RMS power. The amp has EQ baked in, it will hit about 15Hz before it kind of hits the wall.

The Seaton sounds better, the Orbit Shifter has a lot more output. I can't go wrong with either, they are both tremendous. Based on what I've experienced with the OS, it will be hard to live with. I'll be playing whack-a-mole with rattles for months. Everything shakes when you throttle it.

Seaton Submersive review
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  #35  
Old 03-09-2017, 10:31 PM
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I still have both of the mega subs. And I added in two more 15" to flatten the frequency response. So bass is covered, the lights all dim if you throttle it too hard. It plays to 12Hz. I didn't re-wire the house, I had an electrician out and he said it would be several thousand dollars to get 60A. It's plenty loud as-is.

Still pursuing high-efficiency nirvana. I've ordered a pair of speakers from Earl Geddes with 12" woofers and 12" waveguides. I've actually never heard them, so it's a risky move to buy. But Earl is retiring, so it's now or never.
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  #36  
Old 03-10-2017, 09:28 AM
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What kind of acoustic treatment do you have in your rooms with these big fancy speakers?
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Old 03-10-2017, 09:32 AM
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I got Beyerdynamics 770 DT Pro 32 Ohm. That's as far as my audiophilic experience goes.
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  #38  
Old 03-10-2017, 11:42 AM
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What kind of acoustic treatment do you have in your rooms with these big fancy speakers?
None at the moment. I've played around with some and they can make some small differences. This is one advantage to horns, they control the directivity. If you can focus the sound so it's not bouncing off the walls as much, you get more of the direct sound at your ears. That's the basic idea. I'm becoming a somewhat firm believer in horns and, particularly, what are called 'constant directivity' horns/waveguides.
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Old 03-13-2017, 05:54 AM
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Hmmm, interesting. In the audio engineering world, acoustic treatment is one of the fundamental necessities for clear and precise listening. Doesn't matter how nice your equipment is, first reflections simply destroy the clarity of the sound, and proper sound treatment makes a huge difference in what you actually hear. That all being said, I don't have any experience with horns.

Anywho, reason why I brought up audio treatment is that's the next step in my studio. Gonna do a couple of DIY bass traps, a diffuser, and then a bunch of absorption panels. I've got a pretty small, pretty square room, so it'll make a HUGE difference.
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Old 03-13-2017, 11:48 AM
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Hmmm, interesting. In the audio engineering world, acoustic treatment is one of the fundamental necessities for clear and precise listening. Doesn't matter how nice your equipment is, first reflections simply destroy the clarity of the sound, and proper sound treatment makes a huge difference in what you actually hear. That all being said, I don't have any experience with horns.

Anywho, reason why I brought up audio treatment is that's the next step in my studio. Gonna do a couple of DIY bass traps, a diffuser, and then a bunch of absorption panels. I've got a pretty small, pretty square room, so it'll make a HUGE difference.
One issue, for me, is it's my living room, so I have to be mindful of aesthetics. I might be able to get away with a few treatments, but I can't go too nuts.

With respect to bass, multiple subs seems to me to be the best solution.

And the reason is simply that bass tones have very, very long wavelengths. At 20Hz it's almost 60'. Your room is almost certainly quite a bit smaller in any dimension than 60'. So, what happens, in a nutshell, is that at certain frequencies you get constructive interference, and at other frequencies you get destructive interference. Bass traps try to attenuate this, and I think to some extent they may help.

But, imagine instead adding multiple subs. Put the first, for example, in a corner. In a square room you're hitting the same room modes in both directions, huge nulls and peaks. Now, add a second sub along a wall, but a third of the way down the wall instead of a corner. The two subs have one common room mode, but on the other axis, you're hitting different modes. Now, put a third sub kind of near the middle of the room. You get the idea. By having 2-4 subs, and varying the distance between the subs and the walls, you start to sort of average out the freq response.

I'm having issues with my stupid MiniDSP at the moment, it doesn't want to connect to my laptop. In my prior house I had three subs scattered around the room. With a bit of EQ, I was +/- 1.5dB to around 18Hz. In-room, that is very, very flat.
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