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  #1  
Old 09-08-2018, 02:21 AM
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hostess hostess is online now
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Default So I'm looking for a job.... in P&C consulting

So I'm looking for an entry level position in P&C consulting and I graduate in March. I've been applying to positions on Indeed but had no luck so far. I've posted my resume on the careers section and got some feedback. I have an offer from my previous internship (in P&C insurance) with a deadline of the end of October.

HR was a huge stickler for reneging -- they gave us an hour presentation on ethics during our internship and 25 minutes of that was about why reneging is horrible and how it can bite us in the future (... def used as a scare tactic). As a result, if I don't get a consulting opportunity by the end of October, I'll likely go with my insurance gig.

Anyway, if anyone here works in P&C consulting and has openings that aren't posted on indeed, I'd like to chat with you if you have the time!

No clue if this goes against the forum rules, but it's worth a shot.

Last edited by hostess; 09-08-2018 at 05:11 PM..
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Old 09-08-2018, 03:22 AM
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Colonel Smoothie Colonel Smoothie is offline
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Is there any particular reason you want to work in consulting so bad? I've worked on both sides, and I think it's better to work at a large insurer with a good rotation program, and then move to consulting once your exams are done. You'll be a better consultant if you've experienced client business problems firsthand.

As for reneging, the ethics thing is quite silly, really. I'm not saying that reneging won't make you look bad (it will), but if the company has a bad quarter or two in between the time you accept the offer and when you'll start, they won't hesitate to withdraw your offer. HR just exists first and foremost to protect the interests of the shareholders and executives. Their version of ethics = rules that help them survive, but not necessarily for you to survive.

I suggest that you don't stop looking, ever. You never know when a really good opportunity will come your way. Whether or not you ought to reneg depends on how good that other offer is, and how big of an impact your negative reputation at said insurer will impact your career in the future. If that insurer is located way out in po'dunk, then sure, go ahead. But if it's a well established company in close proximity to other companies where you'd might want to work at in the future, then it may not be such a good idea.
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Don't you even think about sending me your resume. I'll turn it into an origami boulder and return it to you.

Last edited by Colonel Smoothie; 09-08-2018 at 03:32 AM..
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Old 09-08-2018, 03:53 PM
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Is there any particular reason you want to work in consulting so bad? I've worked on both sides, and I think it's better to work at a large insurer with a good rotation program, and then move to consulting once your exams are done. You'll be a better consultant if you've experienced client business problems firsthand.

As for reneging, the ethics thing is quite silly, really. I'm not saying that reneging won't make you look bad (it will), but if the company has a bad quarter or two in between the time you accept the offer and when you'll start, they won't hesitate to withdraw your offer. HR just exists first and foremost to protect the interests of the shareholders and executives. Their version of ethics = rules that help them survive, but not necessarily for you to survive.

I suggest that you don't stop looking, ever. You never know when a really good opportunity will come your way. Whether or not you ought to reneg depends on how good that other offer is, and how big of an impact your negative reputation at said insurer will impact your career in the future. If that insurer is located way out in po'dunk, then sure, go ahead. But if it's a well established company in close proximity to other companies where you'd might want to work at in the future, then it may not be such a good idea.

So I’d like to try consulting because I feel like my hours would be more productive. At my carrier, I probably only spent 3 hours a day working and the remaining 5 on leisure. I don’t feel comfortable constantly asking for more work because my manager was in a rut most times. I think that’s just a silent understanding in insurance... i think consulting would be more stimulating.


Also I like the client facing nature and traveling. I know the two aren’t necessarily givens when it comes to actuarial consulting, but hopefully future opportunities may open up that allow for this..

And lastly the profit sharing and merocratic nature appeals to me..
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Old 09-08-2018, 04:20 PM
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So Iíd like to try consulting because I feel like my hours would be more productive. At my carrier, I probably only spent 3 hours a day working and the remaining 5 on leisure. I donít feel comfortable constantly asking for more work because my manager was in a rut most times. I think thatís just a silent understanding in insurance... i think consulting would be more stimulating.


Also I like the client facing nature and traveling. I know the two arenít necessarily givens when it comes to actuarial consulting, but hopefully future opportunities may open up that allow for this..

And lastly the profit sharing and merocratic nature appeals to me..
Work at a smaller carrier then, where youíd get a larger breadth of responsibilities instead of being pigeonholed. Perhaps one with an underwriting focus.
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Old 09-08-2018, 04:24 PM
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So I’d like to try consulting because I feel like my hours would be more productive. At my carrier, I probably only spent 3 hours a day working and the remaining 5 on leisure. I don’t feel comfortable constantly asking for more work because my manager was in a rut most times. I think that’s just a silent understanding in insurance... i think consulting would be more stimulating.
Is that what you saw others doing as well? Working 3 hours/day? Your experience sounds like a normal internship experience, whether insurance or consulting IMO.

Second post in this thread is solid gold CS
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Old 09-08-2018, 04:30 PM
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Work at a smaller carrier then, where youíd get a larger breadth of responsibilities instead of being pigeonholed. Perhaps one with an underwriting focus.
but there would also be much lower pay most likely
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Old 09-08-2018, 04:31 PM
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Is that what you saw others doing as well? Working 3 hours/day? Your experience sounds like a normal internship experience, whether insurance or consulting IMO.

Second post in this thread is solid gold CS
depends on the team... I certainly saw some that worked from home 2-3 days a week and seemed like that they didn't have much going on the days they WERE in office.
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Old 09-08-2018, 11:54 PM
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I think we're just saying that you shouldn't be making career decisions based on your current sample size.
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Old 09-09-2018, 12:12 AM
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but there would also be much lower pay most likely
That's not even close to true. IME those are the jobs that pay >90th percentile
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Old 09-09-2018, 12:48 AM
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I think these points have been touched upon already in this thread, but I'll add some more meat to them:

1) And intern's job responsibilities are usually way less than those of a permanent analyst. During my insurance internship I didn't have much to do, and I liked how at my consulting internships I was always busy. At my permanent jobs in insurance, I have always been busy, but to a point that I would consider healthy.

2) Once you start working full-time, you will have much less time and energy to study for exams than when you're in school. Consulting comes with longer hours and pretty much all my friends in consulting want to switch to insurance cause they can't find the time to study for their exams as much as they would like to.

3) Actuarial consulting is different from management consulting. Early on in your career, I doubt you would be meeting clients or travelling. It takes credentials (ACAS/FCAS) and a certain number of years of experience and credibility to get there. By that time, if you have a family then you may not appreciate all the travelling.
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