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  #21  
Old 09-12-2018, 11:53 AM
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And frankly, if you can't pick up Excel on the job, this isn't the field for you. I agree with the suggestions to learn R, SQL, and Python. If you can explain some non-trivial thing you did with SQL I will definitely consider that a plus. (And I'll assume you can pick up whatever Excel you need.)
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  #22  
Old 09-12-2018, 12:21 PM
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I know a real American who got FCAS at 22.
Oh, my data isn't the most up to date haha.
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  #23  
Old 09-12-2018, 12:25 PM
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OP seems really smart and driven. Could probably be very successful at bigger and better things than just actuarial, imo.
100% on this

Have you considered tech job? How about a lucrative career in capital market?
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  #24  
Old 09-12-2018, 12:49 PM
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By the time you pay for the exam and all associated study materials (plus travel to the exam site if you’re not local), you’re looking at over $2,000 for an upper level exam on the CAS side. I’m assuming the SOA is similar. That would have been a complete nonstarter for me back in college (making minimum wage working at the dining commons while also struggling to pay rent, eating for free as often as I could, and cutting nonessential expenses to nearly zero). The cost for the upper level exams is insane if you’re paying for it by yourself. If you've been making actuarial money for a long time, you might not have that perspective anymore, but the cost is a huge burden. You’re right that the return on investment is pretty good, but short of robbing a bank, I don’t think I would have even been able to scrounge up $2,000 for an exam back then, much less $2,000 a few times a year to take multiple exams. Financial concerns are a perfectly valid reason to slow down unless OP has access to a whole lot of parental money.
it is not cheaper on the SOA side. For FAP, the modules are $300, IA is $600 and FA is $1,200. and you might need to buy books which aren't cheap either. I think that the PA exam is similar in fees. I couldn't do that while in college.
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  #25  
Old 09-12-2018, 12:53 PM
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(EDIT: And, Mod37's post is gone, so none of the below makes any sense.)



Stupid advice. Keep to moderating, bro (sis?).

Remove Mod37 as Mod for having bad opinions!!!!! /red

What will usually happen is that as this poster gains experience, he (she?) will get higher raises, in order to equalize (equalise?) the salaries. Failing that, time to look for a new job.

There is no "years experience" required to join CAS or SOA, but I think there is an experience requirement for AAA, which is required to sign opinions as an actuary.
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  #26  
Old 09-12-2018, 12:54 PM
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I would suggest against learning these. These are easy enough to learn on the job.

Go learn R, Python and SQL.
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It's not a good idea to learn obsolete technology right off the bat...
Mostly agree. Like, if you don't know any Excel, learn that first. Even if you won't need it for your real work, you'll need it to deal with managers, other departments, etc. And it's a bit of a stretch to call them "obsolete", regardless.

But get your Excel skills up to a decent level (lookups, pivot tables, how to link to an external database, etc), and then focus on the up-to-date stuff. You could easily spend a weekend learning everything you'll EVER need to know about Excel. Save the deep dive for R and Python.




Who said consider something non-actuarial? Good point. +1 on that. Nothing wrong with actuarial field, but if I was 18, capable of passing several exams already, and looking at the options available to a new grad these days, actuarial isn't the top of my list.

Last edited by Westley; 09-12-2018 at 12:59 PM..
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  #27  
Old 09-12-2018, 12:58 PM
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excel isn't obsolete. come on!

it's easy to learn, but it isn't obsolete. just learn it really quickly and move on. I think some jobs like to see knowledge of excel on the resume.
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  #28  
Old 09-12-2018, 01:01 PM
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Yeah, if I had done a P&C actuarial internship as a freshman, and had aspirations of becoming a P&C CEO, I'd be looking to do further internships in claims, underwriting, and consulting instead of just further actuarial ones. Those areas might not sound prestigious, but that experience will be valuable when you need to persuade execs in those areas to do things. Having "walked the walk" will give you more credibility than having just done actuarial stuff your entire career.

That was my train of thought, I guess it wasn't exactly what other people here had in mind, but their points are good too.
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  #29  
Old 09-12-2018, 01:03 PM
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excel isn't obsolete. come on!

it's easy to learn, but it isn't obsolete. just learn it really quickly and move on. I think some jobs like to see knowledge of excel on the resume.
Okay it's not obsolete, and you can get jobs doing it just like you can still get jobs doing COBOL.

However, they aren't very good ones.
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  #30  
Old 09-12-2018, 01:10 PM
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excel is obsolete? I'd say its a necessity ... you can probably learn the important stuff in a couple hours though.

Pivot tables/slicers
Vlookup (and Index/Match)
Learn to make charts and graphs

That's really as complicated as things get for intern level imo.
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