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  #401  
Old 12-06-2018, 01:43 PM
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Is it generally recommended to vaccinate kids for the flu in September? When do flu vaccines become available? I thought it was usually more like early October, which would have been too late for the child in Florida.
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Old 12-06-2018, 04:03 PM
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I got mine vaccinated in October
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Old 12-06-2018, 04:57 PM
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Is it generally recommended to vaccinate kids for the flu in September? When do flu vaccines become available? I thought it was usually more like early October, which would have been too late for the child in Florida.
Just checked - I got my flu shot on September 19 at a family practice where they also vaccinate kids.
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Old 12-08-2018, 02:38 PM
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Is it generally recommended to vaccinate kids for the flu in September? When do flu vaccines become available? I thought it was usually more like early October, which would have been too late for the child in Florida.
I think it somewhat depends on the region you live in. I live on the west coast, where the flu tends to hit in force sometime in January. A nurse I knew said something like immunity peaks about 6 weeks and then starts to wane, so he recommended getting the flu shot in the first part of November. I usually get my kids vaccinated in Sept or Oct, as that's when they're in for their annual exam anyway.
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Old 12-17-2018, 05:08 PM
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DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF CONGO
DISEASE X

https://www.express.co.uk/news/world...ch-development

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Disease X: Why have scientists dedicated so much to prepare for MYSTERY disease?
DISEASE X is once again a serious consideration by many eminent scientists, as the effort to fight back against aggressive ebola outbreaks in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) continue in ernest. Why have scientists dedicated so much time to the as of yet unknown disease X?

Spoiler:
Disease and vaccination are a primary concern for many world health services, with certain diseases making a resurgence globally. Among these are serious childhood pathogen measles, and ebola in Africa. These diseases are resurgent for different reasons, the former due to misleading anti-vaccination efforts, and the latter due to the contagious nature of the virus. A recent partnership between Imperial College London and the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI) hopes to ensure rapid-response vaccination is available for a future devastating disease.

RELATED ARTICLES
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Disease X is a mystery disease, currently unknown to the human race, which could one day develop at a rate to cause a global catastrophe.

Currently, it is theoretical, but research bodies are working hard to ensure people are prepared for the day should it eventually come.

According to the World Health Organisation (WHO): “Disease X represents the knowledge that a serious international epidemic could be caused by a pathogen currently unknown to cause human disease.

“So the R&D Blueprint explicitly seeks to enable cross-cutting R&D preparedness that is also relevant for an unknown “Disease X” as far as possible.”

The main problem when it comes to developing vaccinations to combat globally threatening diseases, is the slow progress.


Effective vaccines normally take up to a decade to produce, and a prime example of this is the current situation in the DRC.


Vaccines and other possible treatments are being rolled out in the central African country, however since the devastating 2014 outbreak there is no final solution.


For disease X, Imperial College and the CEPI are working to ensure vaccines can be created and administered in time.

Dr Richard Hatchett, CEO of CEPI, said: “In many ways we are as vulnerable as ever to sudden attack by unknown pathogens.

“We’ve now put a name to such threats: Disease X, listed by WHO as a priority infectious disease threat.

“Our partnership with Imperial represents a vital part of our plan to create vaccine platforms that can significantly reduce vaccine development times from a matter of years to weeks.”

“We cannot predict where or when Disease X will strike, but by developing these kinds of innovative vaccine technologies we can be ready for it.”

Prof Robin Shattock, Chair in Mucosal Infection and Immunity at Imperial College and Principal Investigator, said a new method for creating vaccines will drastically speed up the process.

The new vaccine is to be known as ‘RapidVac’, a self-amplifying vaccine platform which can be quickly produced against emerging disease threats.

The vaccine works with self-amplifying RNA (saRNA), a nucleic acid based technique which requires less regulatory tests and quickly amplifies after delivery to the nucleus, forming an effective immune response.

Imperial College is working to create vaccines using the new technique against influenza (H1N1), Rabies virus, and Marburg virus, and taking the product to human testing.

Professor Shattock said: “We believe that synthetic self-amplifying RNA based vaccines offer the best opportunity for a ‘just in time’ response to infectious outbreaks, providing the needed technological shift to aggressively redefine the timelines for vaccine production.”


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  #406  
Old 12-31-2018, 06:42 AM
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UNITED STATES
SEASONAL FLU

https://wqad.com/2018/12/30/cdc-says...GqyE8ktMjbhX4s

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CDC says flu activity is increasing

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(CNN) -- Flu activity is increasing in the United States, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Friday.

As of the week ending December 22, nine states are experiencing high flu activity -- Alabama, Colorado, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, New Jersey, New Mexico and South Carolina -- as well as New York City. That's an increase from the previous week, when two states, Colorado and Georgia, experienced high flu activity. Seven states and Puerto Rico are experiencing moderate flu activity. Among the four states along the southern US border, flu activity increased to high in New Mexico and moderate in Arizona, the CDC noted.

Geographically, there's widespread flu activity reported in 11 states -- Arizona, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Massachusetts, Nebraska, New Mexico, New York and North Carolina -- and Guam.

Influenza A viruses have been dominating in the United States since the beginning of October, the CDC said, although influenza B viruses are circulating, as well.

There were four flu-related pediatric deaths reported to the CDC during the week ending December 22. There have been 11 total flu-related deaths among children in the 2018-2019 season.

The 2017-2018 flu season was the most deadly in decades with more than 80,000 deaths, including 185 pediatric flu deaths.

Flu symptoms, treatment and prevention
People with the flu often experience fever, chills, coughing, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, muscle or body aches, headaches and fatigue, according to the CDC. Some -- more commonly children -- may also have vomiting and/or diarrhea. Many people people become ill suddenly and recover within a few weeks with rest.

Those who are at higher risk for developing flu-related complications should be treated with antiviral medications as soon as possible. When treatement is started within days of becoming sick, antiviral drugs can lessen symptoms and hasten recovery, and reduce complications and hospitalizations.

Flu complications, such as pneumonia, can result in hospitalization or even death. Some people are at higher risk for complications from the flu, including children younger than 5 years old, particularly those under 2. Also at high risk are adults 65 and older, pregnant women, residents of long-term care facilities and people with medical conditions including weakened immune systems, asthma, heart disease and diabetes.

Hand-washing, staying away from sick people and avoiding touching your eyes, nose and mouth can help prevent the flu. But the most important step to stop seasonal flu, according to the CDC, is for everyone 6 months or older to get vaccinated. As long as flu is circulating in the area where you live, it is not too late to get vaccinated.

Although the vaccine won't prevent all cases of the flu, it lessens the severity and duration of symptoms, and those who get flu after receiving a vaccine are less likely to require hospitalization and less likely to die.


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  #407  
Old 12-31-2018, 07:29 AM
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VACCINES

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-s...-idUSKCN1OP19M

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Sanofi's pediatric hexavalent vaccine approved by U.S. FDA

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PARIS (Reuters) - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Sanofi’s new pediatric vaccine immunizing children against six diseases, the French pharmaceutical lab said on Wednesday.

Sanofi developed the new vaccine, dubbed Vaxelis, in partnership with Merck.

Vaxelis is designed for children aged 6 weeks to 4 years old and is designed to keep them from contracting diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, poliomyelitis, hepatitis B, and invasive disease due to haemophilus influenza type B.

Sanofi and Merck are now working on the production and supply of Vaxelis aiming to make it available on the market in 2020 or later.




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Old 01-25-2019, 07:05 AM
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MEASLES
OREGON and WASHINGTON

https://www.sltrib.com/news/nation-w...I_gLzH5WDI5bxo

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An anti-vaccination ‘hotspot’ near Portland declares an emergency over measles outbreak

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A quickly escalating measles outbreak around Portland, Oregon, has led health officials in nearby Clark County, Washington, to declare a public health emergency as they warn that people infected with the highly contagious virus since the beginning of the year have visited schools and churches, a dentist’s office, an Amazon locker pickup station, a Costco, and an Ikea.

Someone with measles was at Concourse D of the Portland International Airport on Jan. 7, the county’s public health department advised. An infected person attended a Portland Trail Blazers home game on Jan. 11.

At the beginning of last week, there were only a handful of confirmed cases. On Friday, the day the emergency was declared, there were 19. By Sunday, that number had grown to 21. The latest update came Tuesday, when county officials said they had confirmed 23 cases and were investigating two more suspected cases. The vast majority of those who have fallen ill had not been immunized.


The outbreak makes concrete the fears of pediatric epidemiologists that a citadel of the movement against compulsory vaccination could be susceptible to the rapid spread of a potentially deadly disease.

"It's alarming," Douglas J. Opel, a pediatrician at Seattle Children's Hospital, said in an interview with The Washington Post. "Any time we have an outbreak of a disease that we have a safe and effective vaccine against, it should raise a red flag."

State data shows that 7.9 percent of children in Clark County were exempted in the 2017-18 school year from vaccines required for kindergarten entry, which includes the two-dose course for measles that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says is 97 percent effective. Only 1.2 percent of the children had a medical dispensation, meaning that nearly 7 percent were not immunized for personal or religious reasons. Nationally, about 2 percent of children went without required immunization for nonmedical reasons.

The high rate of nonmedical exemption for vaccines is what makes the Portland area, which sits across the Columbia River from Clark County, a "hot spot" for outbreaks, according to Peter J. Hotez, a professor of pediatrics and dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston.

"This is something I've predicted for a while now," he said of the public health emergency in Clark County. "It's really awful and really tragic and totally preventable."


Of the confirmed cases, 18 patients are between the ages of 1 to 10 years old. Twenty of the people who have fallen ill had not been immunized against measles, while the vaccination history of the other three remained unverified. One person has been hospitalized.

Experts advised that the outbreak could still be in its infancy. The incubation period of the virus averages two weeks, and it can be spread four days before a rash makes its onset obvious.

Because measles is among the most highly contagious of all infectious diseases, it is bound to spring up in areas with low vaccination rates, Hotez said. He tracked this effect in a paper last year in the Public Library of Science, linking the number of philosophical exemptions, which has grown since 2009 in 12 of the 18 states that allow them, to increasing outbreaks.

The problem is especially pronounced, the paper found, in more than a dozen "hotspot metropolitan areas," including Portland and Seattle in the Northwest, Phoenix in the Southwest and Pittsburgh in the Northeast.

Public health experts are sounding alarms about the geographical clustering of people who refuse to immunize themselves, which creates vulnerabilities despite the overall high rate of vaccination. Last November, Asheville, North Carolina, another stronghold of the anti-vaccination movement, succumbed to the state's worst chickenpox outbreak since a vaccine for the infection became available more than two decades ago.

"Portland is a total train wreck when it comes to vaccine rates," Hotez said in an interview with The Post.


Opposition to compulsory vaccination in the Pacific Northwest dates to the Progressive Era and continues despite major medical breakthroughs. The modern anti-vaccination movement — built on debunked research published in 1998 that linked the vaccine for measles mumps and rubella, known as the MMR vaccine, to autism — is not exclusive to one side of the political divide, survey data suggests; it tends to find its most fervent supporters at both extremes.

Measles is a dire price to pray for leniency about vaccination, Hotez cautioned, calling the illness "one of the most serious infectious diseases known to humankind." After smallpox was eradicated in 1980, measles became the leading killer of children globally, he said.

Public health officials declared measles eliminated in 2000 because more than a year had gone by without continuous transmission of the disease. But a series of outbreaks in recent years is evidence of dangerous backsliding in containment of the virus, Hotez said, blaming the anti-vaccination movement. "This is a self-inflicted wound," he said.

In 2015, a woman in northwestern Washington died of pneumonia after contracting measles. It was the first U.S. death from the virus since 2003.

Last year saw the second highest number of reported cases of measles since 2000, according to the CDC. A total of 349 cases were confirmed across 26 states and the District of Columbia, only surpassed by the 667 cases in 2014. Orthodox Jewish communities were at the center of a series of outbreaks last year in New York and New Jersey, after unvaccinated travelers brought the virus back from Israel, which was battling an outbreak. The year before, Minnesota reported 75 cases of measles, mostly in a Somali community where the discredited theory blaming autism on the MMR vaccine had taken hold.

Because measles is still endemic in parts of the world, said Opel, "periodic introduction by people traveling is what's causing frequent outbreaks here."

Because the virus is so contagious, he added, a high level of protection is required to prevent spread — somewhere between 92 and 94 percent of the population immunized. Clark County is already below that level, he observed, "before you factor in other things like people just missing their appointments."

The county's health department emphasized how easily the virus can spread, remaining for as long as two hours in the air of a room where an infected person has been.

"If other people breathe the contaminated air or touch a contaminated surface, then touch their eyes, noses or mouths, they can become infected," the county warned in a news release Tuesday. "Measles is so contagious that if one person has it, 90 percent of the people close to that person who are not immune will also become infected."

While the illness often begins with cold-like symptoms and a rash, doctors emphasized that many infected people suffer from additional complications, including pneumonia and, in more serious cases, inflammation of the brain known as encephalitis and even seizures.

“It’s not a benign illness,” Opel said.


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  #409  
Old 01-25-2019, 12:34 PM
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The county's health department emphasized how easily the virus can spread, remaining for as long as two hours in the air of a room where an infected person has been.
This is the most important information.
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Old 01-25-2019, 01:38 PM
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Someone with measles was at Concourse D of the Portland International Airport on Jan. 7
Good thing I have my MMR; I was in Concourse D at PDX then!

Hope I'm not one of the people for whom it didn't take.
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