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  #371  
Old 11-16-2018, 05:12 PM
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Turns out I have severe sleep apnea! Woohoo!

Actually, I'm excited about this. Yes, having apnea sucks, but I've been dealing with the symptoms for a long time, and now a remedy is on the way. Sadly, I can't meet with the sleep doc until 12/7, so I have a few more weeks before I'll get relief. But it just feels great to know that there is a reason for the way I feel, and that there are proven solutions for it.

I'm a little shocked that I was found to be severe, but they gave me very clear, objective measures. My oxygen levels are dropping down to 80% at night. That's really, really bad, for those who don't know. 90% is enough to be considered moderate. 80% is severe.

Now I'm just bummed I have to wait so long to fix this...
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  #372  
Old 11-16-2018, 05:32 PM
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That's great that you're on your way to getting your apnea treated. I wonder if that was also a contributing factor to your polycythemia, given that degree of hypoxia. Being married to someone with sleep apnea, I can say that both bed partners sleep a heck of a lot better with the addition of a CPAP (or BiPAP) machine.
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  #373  
Old 11-16-2018, 05:36 PM
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"it can be treated" is usually good news. Congrats.
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  #374  
Old 11-16-2018, 05:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by <12parsecs View Post
That's great that you're on your way to getting your apnea treated. I wonder if that was also a contributing factor to your polycythemia, given that degree of hypoxia. Being married to someone with sleep apnea, I can say that both bed partners sleep a heck of a lot better with the addition of a CPAP (or BiPAP) machine.
Well, I didn't ever have polycythemia before the testosterone. But I've read that apnea can certainly contribute to low testosterone. So I'd be curious to see if I could go without testosterone after I treat the apnea. Maybe then I could take care of both problems with the one treatment (CPAP).

I won't try it without running past my doc.
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  #375  
Old 11-16-2018, 08:22 PM
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It turns out the most common cause of secondary polycythemia is apnea. Wow. So now I'm wondering, if I can't give up the testosterone without my levels dropping crazy low again, perhaps I'll better tolerate it once I'm on CPAP, and maybe not trigger the polycythemia in the future.
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  #376  
Old 12-07-2018, 01:29 PM
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I got my CPAP machine today! I can't wait to try it tonight. Even just trying the machine out, I found it so much easier to take a full breath. Now, as I sit here at my desk typing, I'm aware just how much I have to make an effort to draw in air. Granted, it's the time of year when I deal with a lot of congestion problems.

It was funny talking to the sleep specialist. He said, "With your apnea so severe, you're likely dealing with a whole host of health issues. If you had your testosterone tested right now, it would probably be pretty low." So I told him about my history there, to which he responded, "Don't change anything you're doing for a few months. But the next time you see your urologist, you might get his thoughts on going off the shots. Because after you've been on this treatment a while, your body might be more capable of producing its own testosterone."
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  #377  
Old 12-07-2018, 06:23 PM
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  #378  
Old 12-07-2018, 06:24 PM
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  #379  
Old 12-07-2018, 08:11 PM
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Originally Posted by Egghead View Post
I got my CPAP machine today! I can't wait to try it tonight. Even just trying the machine out, I found it so much easier to take a full breath. Now, as I sit here at my desk typing, I'm aware just how much I have to make an effort to draw in air. Granted, it's the time of year when I deal with a lot of congestion problems.

It was funny talking to the sleep specialist. He said, "With your apnea so severe, you're likely dealing with a whole host of health issues. If you had your testosterone tested right now, it would probably be pretty low." So I told him about my history there, to which he responded, "Don't change anything you're doing for a few months. But the next time you see your urologist, you might get his thoughts on going off the shots. Because after you've been on this treatment a while, your body might be more capable of producing its own testosterone."
Just about to post info about cortisol, a hormone in your body that helps it handle stress. And "not enough sleep" is a big stress machine. And "handle stress" means doing a lot of things to your body so that it survives. Sounds great, but one of those survival things is storing fat in your midsection, and breaking down muscles so your organs survive.
The CPAP should help with all this.

Good luck! And don't be afraid to sleep a little longer.
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  #380  
Old 12-07-2018, 09:05 PM
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Sounds good! best wishes.
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