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Old 01-22-2019, 09:02 PM
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Default Recruiter rights trigger

When exactly is the moment that a recruiter attains a claim to a commission on an eventual hire? Is it:

- when the recruiter mentions the person's name to the company?
- when the recruiter mentions the person, even if not by name?
- when the recruiter presents a resume?

Sorry if this is in another thread somewhere
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Old 01-22-2019, 09:08 PM
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Default Recruiter rights trigger

Generally it is when the resume is presented with your permission and the recruiter has a contingent contract with the hiring company. Sometimes if you’re a known talent in the industry, and you have given permission to the recruiter to submit your name for consideration, that may be when you become represented by the recruitment firm.

This is how DWS does it, but I can’t speak for other firms or industries. Some recruiters will claim “rights” of a candidate submission even when they don’t have any real relationship with the applicant.

I have seen solo recruiters do a spray and pray method, and then attempt to claim a fee after another recruiting firm completes the process. Most companies will not fall for it, but some still do.


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Old 01-22-2019, 09:14 PM
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Thanks, Tom.

My recruiter has been very frustrating so far (rarely responds to communications, 1 presentation and no interview) and now wants to put out sort of an APB (no resumes yet, I've made it clear) for companies in the area, which would seem like a good thing, but I'm not sure I want to continue with this recruiter due to said frustrations. Wondering whether I should stop the presses before I have to rely on the recruiter in pursuing every company in the area for what is it... a year?
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Old 01-22-2019, 09:24 PM
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You can always end a relationship with a recruiter, but if they have submitted your resume to several companies, each company has a “recognition period” they would follow.

If you want to send me an email about your goals, what you need from a recruiter, I’d be happy to go in more specifics.

Feel free to email me anytime at Tom.Troceen@dwsimpson.com.

Best of luck with your job search,

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Old 01-23-2019, 09:45 AM
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I've dealt with a few of the big recruiting firms and can second that DWS approaches things fairly. One time they placed me without getting a commission due to a technicality and then ended up placing me in two more jobs.

Not sure exactly what the deal was.
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Old 01-23-2019, 10:04 AM
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Will just add I think a bit of clarity to Tom's comments - the recruiter has a claim to a commission when he meets the requirements that are spelled out in his contract with the company. You don't necessarily get to know what that contract says.

For example, the "recognition period" he references - I had a contract that said if the recruiter presented a resume to me, and my company hired that person within 6 months for any reason in any position, we paid the recruiter. It was very broad, but totally fair for the position we were discussing.

Tom, if you're willing, I think an interesting question would be, if the OP is ready to change recruiters, what does he say to the recruiter? (BTW, any time you are frustrated, just move on IMO - the number of people staying with bad recruiters* dwarfs the number who are firing good ones, so err in the direction to equalize that). Assume you don't want to screw the recruiter over on work he's already done but don't want him to go any farther. Is "I want a list of anywhere you've sent my resume just so I know where not to pursue and because I want to protect your role and commission to the extent you've already put in the work, but I don't want you to send it elsewhere moving forward" a reasonable line? And obv recruiter will ask why and maybe you tell him you're going to find a better recruiter match or whatever?



*recruiters who are bad at the job, or even just who are good at the job but a bad fit for a particular person/role
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Old 01-23-2019, 10:50 AM
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good discussion so far.

Hypothetical situation: If you dont like your recruiter, is it frowned upon to contact a new recruiter at the same company? Maybe I dont want to write off a whole agency due to one bad recruiter, but I understand that could cause some drama within that company.

I notice multiple recruiters from the same company contacting me sometimes, but usually they have different fields/geo areas. They arnt selling the same jobs.
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Old 01-23-2019, 11:13 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DataDan View Post
good discussion so far.

Hypothetical situation: If you dont like your recruiter, is it frowned upon to contact a new recruiter at the same company? Maybe I dont want to write off a whole agency due to one bad recruiter, but I understand that could cause some drama within that company.

I notice multiple recruiters from the same company contacting me sometimes, but usually they have different fields/geo areas. They arnt selling the same jobs.
I have switched within a company. not bc the person was "bad". But bc my previous person with whom I'd had a lot of conversations had left and I was assigned to someone I had no relationship with. But others within that company I had met and chatted with a number of times. I asked to be switched (I asked the person I wanted to go to) and it worked out.

could vary by company.
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Old 01-24-2019, 10:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DataDan View Post
good discussion so far.

Hypothetical situation: If you dont like your recruiter, is it frowned upon to contact a new recruiter at the same company? Maybe I dont want to write off a whole agency due to one bad recruiter, but I understand that could cause some drama within that company.

I notice multiple recruiters from the same company contacting me sometimes, but usually they have different fields/geo areas. They arnt selling the same jobs.
I sort of did this, but asked the 2nd if it would be an issue if I worked with them. They said, no conflict, same team, etc.
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Old 01-25-2019, 05:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DataDan View Post
good discussion so far.

Hypothetical situation: If you dont like your recruiter, is it frowned upon to contact a new recruiter at the same company? Maybe I dont want to write off a whole agency due to one bad recruiter, but I understand that could cause some drama within that company.

I notice multiple recruiters from the same company contacting me sometimes, but usually they have different fields/geo areas. They arnt selling the same jobs.
If you don't feel you're clicking with a recruiter, I think you should feel free to change recruiters at any time. Be graceful about it, but still - it's your career and your livelihood at stake, which imo, outweighs their commission.

That said, I've had great relationships with my past recruiters. My last one was very straightforward at the beginning, and told me that I'm welcome to work with other recruiters... but that I should only ever submit one resume to a company, through one recruiter. He asked that I make sure any other recruiter I worked with only ever submitted resumes for me with my express permission. Which seemed reasonable. I never did use another recruiter though, so I don't know how it really works in application as opposed to theory.
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