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  #41  
Old 08-22-2018, 04:05 PM
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ronaldy27 ronaldy27 is offline
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I'm seriously down to spend like $3500 on a PC. The cost doesn't bother me much.
I just hate to replace parts over and over. I hate the hassle.
I know it's not a necessity but I'd be bothered by how there is a "better" part out there and I'd itch to upgrade.
This is the reason why I just game on consoles. It's simple.
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  #42  
Old 08-22-2018, 04:41 PM
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Originally Posted by ronaldy27 View Post
I know it's not a necessity but I'd be bothered by how there is a "better" part out there and I'd itch to upgrade.
This is the reason why I just game on consoles. It's simple.
On a console, wouldn't you always have that itch, knowing that the PC is out there being better?
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  #43  
Old 08-22-2018, 05:02 PM
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On a console, wouldn't you always have that itch, knowing that the PC is out there being better?
not me
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  #44  
Old 08-22-2018, 05:08 PM
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Originally Posted by ronaldy27 View Post
I'm seriously down to spend like $3500 on a PC. The cost doesn't bother me much.
I just hate to replace parts over and over. I hate the hassle.
I know it's not a necessity but I'd be bothered by how there is a "better" part out there and I'd itch to upgrade.
This is the reason why I just game on consoles. It's simple.
While PC offers the convenience of being able to upgrade one part at a time, my preference (at least now) is to do the entire build at once, where all the parts used are around the same performance level. That way, there isn't really any one part in particular that's bottlenecking the system. When the computer no longer cuts it, I'd just build a new one and sell off the old one.

However, now that I've built a much stronger PC, that might change, but only because it's difficult to predict what advances will be made in the future. Will I end up needing to get an RTX card a lot sooner than my 1080ti would normally be replaced? Who knows.

I say, spend 2k+ on your dream computer (going above 3k either means you need a ton of storage / different kind of processor / multiple GPU's for professional production stuff, which I'm willing to bet is not the case for any of us). Once you build your PC, stop following hardware news very closely and stop browsing through pcpartpicker every day and just enjoy it. That's how I try to fight off the itch.
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  #45  
Old 08-22-2018, 05:18 PM
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Originally Posted by G-Funk View Post
On a console, wouldn't you always have that itch, knowing that the PC is out there being better?
That is why I have a console, its much easier to justify not satisfying that itch because you have the console.
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  #46  
Old 08-22-2018, 05:52 PM
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Originally Posted by Sredni Vashtar View Post
No, not unless you're obsessive about graphics. I think 'normal' gamers update their PCs about as often as they buy new consoles.

I don't recommend building a PC btw, unless you want to see what's under the hood. It's a bunch of hassle for very little savings, unless you are really obsessive about rebates and questionable versions of Windows.


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I'd disagree. I haven't ever seen a pre-built PC where I said 'that's a good balance of performance in all parts and reasonably priced'

It's always something like 'oh, it has a good processor and graphics card, but the SSD is only 128GB, or there is no SSD, or there's practically no airflow/adequate cooling, or the RAM is slow/not enough.' If I do ever see a well-built PC with the balance I would expect, it's somewhere around 25-50% marked up.
When I got mine (admittedly a while ago, but I wouldn't expect much to have changed) there really wasn't much of a mark up. Just about all the savings I saw would have been due to mail in rebates which are an annoying hassle. I got mine through cyberpowerpc.

A lot of the standard model computers they sell probably have poor set ups or unnecessary mark ups...but they had enough options to customize that I was able to select just about all the parts I would have bought anyway and they did a much better job of cable management in the case then I would have.
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  #47  
Old 08-22-2018, 08:05 PM
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Seeing as how I've never built a PC, and don't really know much about the hardware, would people recommend not going crazy? How likely am I to ruin thousands of dollars of parts?
You're not likely to ruin it, but if you don't know what you're doing there's a significant chance you could build a system that doesn't boot, or is annoyingly suboptimal for the money spent -- too noisy, overheats too easily, performance bottlenecked for one reason or another, etc.... and then you have to spend more money and/or time to make it right.

If you're spending thousands of dollars, just buy a pre-built PC with a powerful i7 CPU, or a Xeon workstation from Dell or HP or Lenovo, and throw a high-end video card in there.

It boils down to what you're expecting to gain from building your own. If it's to save money, don't. These days you don't save much by building your own. It's not like 15-20 years ago when you could buy less than $1500 of parts and put together the equivalent of a $2000 name-brand PC.

If it's because you want the experience of building it, including initially getting it wrong and learning from your mistakes, go ahead, just make sure you're prepared.
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  #48  
Old 08-22-2018, 08:28 PM
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I'd like to know where you all are finding these prebuilt or custom built PC's for close to the same price as buying the components directly. I went to cyberpower to try to recreate the PC I built, and I tried to match the parts as close as possible. I couldn't get the coordination I wanted (limited choices) and it still came out to over $300 more, and that's assuming I won't get charged any shipping or tax fees from cyberpower. The cool thing is that they offered an extra 2TB HDD for free for whatever back to school promo is going on.

I'm not saying that those services or sites aren't great or that people shouldn't use them. There's definitely value there and a market they cater to. I just want to understand the claims about pricing. Maybe it's closer with lower budget builds, or the problem is that they only offer certain brands of hardware that are always more expensive, so comparing their prices to market for the exact same item might be closer.
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  #49  
Old 08-22-2018, 11:04 PM
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I'd like to know where you all are finding these prebuilt or custom built PC's for close to the same price as buying the components directly. I went to cyberpower to try to recreate the PC I built, and I tried to match the parts as close as possible. I couldn't get the coordination I wanted (limited choices) and it still came out to over $300 more, and that's assuming I won't get charged any shipping or tax fees from cyberpower.
It's going to cost more if you buy a branded PC that way, based on trying to replicate a predetermined set of components.

Instead, think of it in terms of requirements -- a CPU with at least so many cores and threads, with a benchmark score of at least XXXX, comes with at least xx GB RAM with room for Y more, the case has space for Z hard drives, power supply has at least Q watts, etc. -- then look for a prebuilt or customizable system that provides most or all of those requirements.

However, those systems tend to skimp or overcharge on the video cards, so if possible, get it with no video card or a dirt cheap video card, then put in your own separately purchased video card.
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  #50  
Old 08-23-2018, 09:40 AM
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Originally Posted by Incredible Hulctuary View Post
It's going to cost more if you buy a branded PC that way, based on trying to replicate a predetermined set of components.

Instead, think of it in terms of requirements -- a CPU with at least so many cores and threads, with a benchmark score of at least XXXX, comes with at least xx GB RAM with room for Y more, the case has space for Z hard drives, power supply has at least Q watts, etc. -- then look for a prebuilt or customizable system that provides most or all of those requirements.

However, those systems tend to skimp or overcharge on the video cards, so if possible, get it with no video card or a dirt cheap video card, then put in your own separately purchased video card.
If you're putting a high end video card into a branded box you should also be putting in a higher quality PSU and tossing the (typically POS) OEM unit. That can eat into the imagined savings pretty quickly. If you're not shooting super high in terms of graphics, but are dropping in a high-mid-range card this can be a good value, as you might be okay on the PSU front.
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