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  #1  
Old 11-26-2018, 09:31 AM
Frustrated & Unmotivated Frustrated & Unmotivated is offline
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Default R or Python?

Which should I learn first? R or Python? I know nothing about either.

which is more widely adopted, in case of me needing to look for something new? (I'm P&C)

My work IT dept, is always skittish about installing new software. Are either of them more problematic than the other? (e.g. license fees, or anything else that could make an IT team skittish?)

sorry , don't know what other questions to ask. Am I forgetting anything?
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  #2  
Old 11-26-2018, 09:48 AM
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  #3  
Old 11-26-2018, 09:53 AM
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Obligatory:
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  #4  
Old 11-26-2018, 10:01 AM
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Seriouser answer/questions:
- what languages/software do you know already?
- why do you want to learn something new (other than resume padding)?
- what do you hope to do with your new skills?
- are you looking to migrate some current process, or have you reached a limitation of your current toolset that you're hoping can be overcome with a new tool?
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  #5  
Old 11-26-2018, 10:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marcie View Post
Seriouser answer/questions:
- what languages/software do you know already?
- why do you want to learn something new (other than resume padding)?
- what do you hope to do with your new skills?
- are you looking to migrate some current process, or have you reached a limitation of your current toolset that you're hoping can be overcome with a new tool?
Why do you need to know why?

I think R is probably more practical for your day job. I would learn that first.

Python is probably more useful as a programmer.
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Old 11-26-2018, 10:42 AM
Frustrated & Unmotivated Frustrated & Unmotivated is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marcie View Post
Seriouser answer/questions:
- what languages/software do you know already?
- why do you want to learn something new (other than resume padding)?
- what do you hope to do with your new skills?
- are you looking to migrate some current process, or have you reached a limitation of your current toolset that you're hoping can be overcome with a new tool?
Software that i know: (personal self-assessment, out of 10):
Excel (graphical...i.e. non-vba) 9
Excel (MS?) power BI 1 (watched a couple webinars only, haven't been able to apply)
VBA 7
Access 4
SQL 2
SAS 1 (old jobs, havent used in years)

WHy? Mostly resume padding, TBH. But also to take advantage of the data processing power that I keep hearing about.

What to do (and migration question): more efficiently data process. Small company and for internal analysis, I don't use any reserving packages (I do get triangles from system), but i have to build all my analyses in excel. From what I understand R or Python could help me build the framework much easier, especially for different cuts of data where I have to add multiple triangles together, or even build my own capped/excess triangles.
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  #7  
Old 11-26-2018, 10:55 AM
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Colonel Smoothie Colonel Smoothie is offline
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Shouldn't an IT department know what R and Python are? In this day and age?
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  #8  
Old 11-26-2018, 10:56 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by act_123 View Post
Why do you need to know why?

I think R is probably more practical for your day job. I would learn that first.

Python is probably more useful as a programmer.

R is built for statistical work and modeling. Python seems like it's more for manipulating and/or building programs within Windows (or Linux but no one uses that in a work environment), though my experience with Python is n00b level so take that assessment with a grain of salt.
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Old 11-26-2018, 10:58 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colonel Smoothie View Post
Shouldn't an IT department know what R and Python are? In this day and age?
too.

How is your IT department skittish about installing Python or R? Your IT department should be replaced with IT people imo.

nm, that was phrased as a question in the OP. No, they should not be worried about either of these.
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  #10  
Old 11-26-2018, 11:00 AM
Frustrated & Unmotivated Frustrated & Unmotivated is offline
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When I say skittish, I mean they're very risk averse with new software. it took a few weeks of testing to allow us to install @Risk. they test to make sure nothing we install has unintended consequences with other software, networks, etc.

Not entirely unreasonable in concept, but they are are tighter than most.
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