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  #41  
Old 11-03-2014, 01:31 PM
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that doesn't sound very scientific
I'm just learning about the field. It still seems scientific in that it's empirically based, they're just trying to create a discipline to automate the actual search for models.
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  #42  
Old 11-03-2014, 01:47 PM
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that doesn't sound very scientific
I don't know if things will go that way for data science but in quite a few fields people concentrate on data gathering and "rule of thumb" making before brilliant theoreticians are able to make sense of everything and come up with overarching theories.

In electromagnetism you had the reign of the practical men whose knowledge was then all synthetized by Maxwell. In paleontology and zoology you had a lot of knowledge lying around until Darwin came along. Etc.
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  #43  
Old 11-03-2014, 02:28 PM
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I think a better argument can be made for "Why don't more people study CS and go work for Tech companies."

Case in point. One of my wife's hot friends who graduated from Stanford with some type of Computer Engineering degree has bounced around various Tech companies out there until the last 5 years where she's been with Google. Let's just say I thought I was doing alright salary wise, then I hear what she makes.

If you're good at math and more importantly good with computer science / programming or whatever you want to call it these days. I'd go the Tech route.

This whole actuarial motto that we wanted to choose a math route that was business oriented is silly. I for one like it a lot and can't see myself exiting the P&C Insurance industry but let's get real. It's insurance. Money can be made by the time you have grey hair and are older.

But if you are truly the brightest and a wiz with any computer code/software thrown at you get yourself a job with either a tech giant or another well funded and managed Silicon Valley position.
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  #44  
Old 11-03-2014, 02:31 PM
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Why did you have to emphasize that she was hot? Also, is she single?
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  #45  
Old 11-03-2014, 02:33 PM
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Why did you have to emphasize that she was hot? Also, is she single?
I just couldn't help myself.
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  #46  
Old 11-03-2014, 02:40 PM
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Yeah data science seems like a trap degree, mostly created to capitalize on the fad. I think it's better to get a Math or CS masters degree. If you're doing Math you better be doing your fair share of programming and if you're doing CS you better be doing your fair share of math.
Dunno. I looked at one recently that was pretty good. Housed in the CS department and you took core classes a graduate CS major would take. You then took about 6 specialized classes involving statistics, machine learning, HADOOP/NoSQL and a few others which I can't remember.
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  #47  
Old 11-03-2014, 02:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Beach Bum View Post
I think a better argument can be made for "Why don't more people study CS and go work for Tech companies."

Case in point. One of my wife's hot friends who graduated from Stanford with some type of Computer Engineering degree has bounced around various Tech companies out there until the last 5 years where she's been with Google. Let's just say I thought I was doing alright salary wise, then I hear what she makes.

If you're good at math and more importantly good with computer science / programming or whatever you want to call it these days. I'd go the Tech route.

This whole actuarial motto that we wanted to choose a math route that was business oriented is silly. I for one like it a lot and can't see myself exiting the P&C Insurance industry but let's get real. It's insurance. Money can be made by the time you have grey hair and are older.

But if you are truly the brightest and a wiz with any computer code/software thrown at you get yourself a job with either a tech giant or another well funded and managed Silicon Valley position.
But see, CS is just creating the tools. It's analogous to the people creating measuring tools, which the scientists then use to discover knowledge. Going into big data as a software engineer, you're just working on extending the storage/processing/throughput capacity for the data. I didn't want to work for a tech company because I didn't want to be a tool-maker my whole life. Now I'm a report-maker!
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  #48  
Old 11-03-2014, 02:43 PM
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But see, CS is just creating the tools. It's analogous to the people creating measuring tools, which the scientists then use to discover knowledge. Going into big data as a software engineer, you're just working on extending the storage/processing/throughput capacity for the data. I didn't want to work for a tech company because I didn't want to be a tool-maker my whole life. Now I'm a report-maker!
By tools, do you mean enterprise software? Most statisticians I know would rather program and use libraries to manipulate data and perform calculations than to use something like Tableau. The most harcore actuaries I know would rather use R than Emblem.
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  #49  
Old 11-03-2014, 02:44 PM
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Dunno. I looked at one recently that was pretty good. Housed in the CS department and you took core classes a graduate CS major would take. You then took about 6 specialized classes involving statistics, machine learning, HADOOP/NoSQL and a few others which I can't remember.
There are a few good programs, but I can think of a prominent one that just recently came out that feels very trap and is very expensive.

-Riley
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  #50  
Old 11-03-2014, 02:46 PM
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By tools, do you mean enterprise software? Most statisticians I know would rather program and use libraries to manipulate data and perform calculations than to use something like Tableau. The most harcore actuaries I know would rather use R than Emblem.
Yeah, enterprise software. I want to actually make decisions, not code according to specs.
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