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  #31  
Old 06-05-2017, 12:25 PM
Westley Westley is offline
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Yeah, I keep getting the "attempted to leave a vmail" which might have made sense 20 years ago when people didn't know whether that was true or not. Today, I know you didn't leave a message because if you had, I would have seen the message or at least the caller ID.
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  #32  
Old 06-05-2017, 01:40 PM
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I get LinkedIn messages about very responsible Life or P&C roles when I've never done either.

More subtly: Also about group accident pricing etc, when I've only really orchestrated RFPs and whatnot
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  #33  
Old 06-05-2017, 05:44 PM
Westley Westley is offline
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Just a random article I saw today, worth a read:

https://www.forbes.com/sites/lizryan.../#4f7759567a7b

(emphasis mine)
Quote:
Dear Liz,

I know you say that we might have to kiss a lot of toads before we find the right recruiter, but I'm getting discouraged.

This morning a recruiter contacted me and asked me to call her at lunchtime — one hour later. I thought that was rather presumptuous, but I was able to get out of the office and into my car at noon so I called her, even though our department was having a lunch meeting.

The recruiter's first question was "What are you earning now?"

I said "I'm focusing on jobs that pay at least $65,000."

She said "Oh, that's the new answer candidates love to give me — it doesn't matter, I'll get your salary information later."

Then she said "You're asking for a high salary for someone your age."

She didn't know my age.

She might have guessed my age from my LinkedIn profile, but why is my age her business anyway?

I said "In my industry that salary range is normal."

She said "What do you consider your industry?"

I said "I'm an Associate in a consulting firm. Sixty-five thousand is low. I work for a smaller firm. I'm looking for the right leadership and culture as much as I am looking for the right salary. That's why I'm willing to take a $65,000 job."

She said "Send me your resume and I'll take a look at it. I really don't know your background."

That blew my mind. Why did she call me if she hadn't looked at my LinkedIn profile in any depth?

My LinkedIn profile is identical to my resume.

Why are recruiters so rude to job-seekers?

Thanks Liz,

Corinne





Dear Corinne,

Imagine a job that anyone can get just by saying "This is my new job."

That's how recruiting jobs work.

You could become a recruiter right now by calling yourself a recruiter and reaching out to a bunch of strangers to get their resumes.

Then you could take those resumes and pass them around to employers to see if any of the employers want to interview one of your candidates.

Easy peasy!

Of course, being a professional recruiter is much harder. Good recruiters work their tails off. You will be able to spot a great recruiter right away when you talk with them. They know what jobs pay. They take the time to learn about candidates before reaching out to them, and most of all they don't ask job-seekers "What are you earning now?"

It's none of their business — and smart recruiters know it!

You will have to kiss some toads on your way to finding the right recruiting partner — but right now you are going on multiple dates with toads and letting them abuse you!

Don't tell a recruiter who rudely asks you to make yourself available one hour hence "Sure, I can do that."

That was your first mistake. Why should you move your schedule around to suit her? You are broadcasting neediness, and that is the last thing you want to do on a job-search (or at any other time).

You decide who you want to speak with and when. If you feel desperate, the waves of desperation will rise from you like steam off a radiator and everyone will see and feel it.

You don't need to jump on the phone with any Tom, Dick or Harriett the Recruiter who reaches out to you.

You can review their LinkedIn profile. You can take your time. You can send back an email message explaining what you are looking for in your job search.

You are in the driver's seat — but only if you believe it.

You can tell when a recruiter is unaccustomed to working with candidates who have normal self-esteem.

You can tell by the impolite things they say, like these ten statements that mean "You are nothing to me:"

1. Get me your resume right away. (Until they tell you about a specific job they think you're a good fit for, don't send your resume to anybody!)

2. I have to know what you're earning now — and so does my client, the employer who's hiring. (Tell them that it's not a good match in that case. More and more legislatures are passing laws prohibiting employers from asking for your salary history — do you want to work for a company that still insists your salary history is their business?)

3. I'm going to need written proof of your last year's earnings. (I understand that you think you need it, but you're not getting it.)

4. You aren't an especially strong candidate for this role. (Why do you have time to talk with me in that case?)

5. If I don't hear anything from my client, I won't get back to you — in that case you can assume they're not interested. (Good-bye. A recruiter who won't follow up after sending a resume to a client is not someone who deserves to represent me.)

6. There are a lot of qualified people around. You're not that exceptional. (See ya!)

7. You have to trust me. (You can earn my trust, if you want to invest the time. No adult would trust someone just because they are told 'You have to trust me.')

8. Sometimes you go to an interview and the client stops communicating with you — that's how it is. (If you can't get feedback from your client after my job interview, let's call it quits right now. I need to work with someone whose client relationships are stronger than that.)

9. If I don't get back to you, keep following up with me. (If you can't manage your job, why would I entrust my career to you?)

10. Look, I'm doing a lot for you! (Another way to describe our relationship is that placing someone like me into a new job is the only way you make money. Rather than telling me how important you are to me, why not ask me what I need in order to make the relationship work? Better yet, let's part ways — all the best to you!)

A great recruiter is an incredible ally in your career journey.

However, dealing with the wrong recruiter can sap your mojo and drain your self-confidence.


Don't stay in a relationship with the wrong recruiter! If one recruiter reached out to you, others will, too. You are way too mighty to let a fearful person dim your flame.

Yours,

Liz
Summary: Many recruiters are awful. I'm still undecided on the relative merits of finding a way to get them to work with you in a way that is effective versus telling them to get lost and just stick to the best ones, but have posted elsewhere that part of it is having a relationship with them before you need a job. Once they have a listing, they're just trying to get a stack of resumes to stick in front of somebody.
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  #34  
Old 06-14-2017, 04:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lazyrecruiter
Greetings Allan,

I came across your profile. You would be an excellent fit for one of our client for their Fulltime Sr. Government Health Actuarial Consultant - FSA position.
Second verse, same as the first...So, you read my resume linkedin profile which clearly shows that I've been a Life actuary for my entire career and that I have an ASA yet you think this job (which REQUIRES an FSA & is in Health) would be a great fit for me?

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  #35  
Old 07-09-2017, 11:41 PM
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email subject:
Quote:
Salary Conformation, Immediate job oppournity

con·for·ma·tion
ˌkänfôrˈmāSHən,ˌkänfərˈmāSHən/
noun
noun: conformation; plural noun: conformations
  1. the shape or structure of something, especially an animal.
    "the judges run their hands over the dog's body and legs, checking its conformation"
    • Chemistry
      any of the spatial arrangements that the atoms in a molecule may adopt and freely convert between, especially by rotation about individual single bonds.
also, this:
https://www.spellchecker.net/misspellings/oppournity

Quote:
Hello Allan,

Greetings form ABC Inc!!
Hope you are doing Good!!

data.grammarbook.com/blog/adjectives-adverbs/good-v-well/

Quote:
Provide us the best number ot reach you.
Do you see that red squiggly line underneath some of your words? That means they're most likely misspelled.


...and here's the kicker...

Underneath his email to me was an entire email chain with another person he's trying to place for a similar job posting.

Last edited by 1695814; 07-09-2017 at 11:46 PM..
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  #36  
Old 07-10-2017, 10:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1695814 View Post
email subject:

con·for·ma·tion
ˌkänfôrˈmāSHən,ˌkänfərˈmāSHən/
noun
noun: conformation; plural noun: conformations
  1. the shape or structure of something, especially an animal.
    "the judges run their hands over the dog's body and legs, checking its conformation"
    • Chemistry
      any of the spatial arrangements that the atoms in a molecule may adopt and freely convert between, especially by rotation about individual single bonds.
also, this:
https://www.spellchecker.net/misspellings/oppournity


data.grammarbook.com/blog/adjectives-adverbs/good-v-well/

Do you see that red squiggly line underneath some of your words? That means they're most likely misspelled.


...and here's the kicker...

Underneath his email to me was an entire email chain with another person he's trying to place for a similar job posting.
24k gold
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  #37  
Old 07-14-2017, 01:41 PM
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1695814 1695814 is offline
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OK, this is the last one of these that I'm going to post...
Quote:
Originally Posted by shooting arrows into a dark cave
Dear ASA,

I am a lazyass recruiter for ABC Ins Co. and your experience is very impressive....I think you may be a fit for our FSA position.
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  #38  
Old 07-14-2017, 02:14 PM
Chopin-Lover Chopin-Lover is offline
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A couple that I got from Linkedin message recently.

1. I'm impressed with your experience in actuarial science... (Can't be a little more specific?)
2. I see that you've been with your company for a while and may be considering new opportunities... (I've switched role recently and it's on my Linkedin profile)
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  #39  
Old 07-14-2017, 03:07 PM
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Also from LinkedIn:

Quote:
coinfootball,

I like the actuarial experience at [current company].

I'm working on a Sr. Accountant opportunity at [new company] up in [city]. They just went over $1 billion, expanding their largest plant.

Do you have interest in discussing?
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  #40  
Old 07-17-2017, 10:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chopin-Lover View Post
A couple that I got from Linkedin message recently.

1. I'm impressed with your experience in actuarial science... (Can't be a little more specific?)
2. I see that you've been with your company for a while and may be considering new opportunities... (I've switched role recently and it's on my Linkedin profile)
I've gotten more pings from fly-by-night recruiters since I started my new job than the entire year before. Whatever!
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