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View Poll Results: Are you in favor of one-way video interviews?
Yay 2 3.70%
Nay 51 94.44%
42 1 1.85%
Voters: 54. You may not vote on this poll

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  #11  
Old 11-29-2018, 04:21 PM
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https://www.wsj.com/articles/its-tim...elf-1543418495

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It’s Time for Your Job Interview. You’ll Be Talking to Yourself
In an ultratight labor market, more employers roll out automated, one-sided phone interviews; ‘I blanked out’

Spoiler:
The questions sound familiar: "Describe a time when you went above and beyond"; "Tell me about a time when you had to deliver bad news to a customer."

But in this telephone job interview, there is a twist: No human is on the other end of the line.

As companies compete for workers in the tightest labor market in decades, more employers are trying to streamline the hiring process to nab promising candidates before they can get away. For some, that has meant rethinking the tried-and-true phone interview, rolling out one-sided, automated exchanges in which applicants give recorded responses to a series of questions.

It is much like leaving a voice mail -- only one with a job on the line.

Major companies such as laboratory-test provider Quest Diagnostics Inc., hospital operator HCA Healthcare Inc. and insurer Allstate Insurance Co. use such interviews for some hiring, as do retailers, restaurant chains and law firms.

In May, job site Indeed introduced a set of text- and audio-based skills tests for employers to assess job candidates at no extra cost, including an option for a one-way phone interview, meaning that even the smallest U.S. businesses can now use them in the hiring process.

Jeremy Maffei took his first-ever automated interview in October after applying for a role as a digital marketing specialist at a small marketing agency in Florida. The interview lasted less than 10 minutes, but Mr. Maffei said it threw him off. "I blanked out," the 42-year-old recalled. He was asked to describe his biggest success and failure, yet with no one on the line, he couldn't tell whether his responses resonated. "It's highly impersonal," he said.

Some employers say such interviews are more efficient and candidate-friendly. Applicants can take the interviews at any time of day, even after work, and the answers can later be reviewed by a hiring manager. The goal, those companies say, is speed.

With the unemployment rate at 3.7% and job openings outnumbering unemployed Americans by more than one million, companies want to lock in hires as quickly as they can, recruiters say.

"There's a little bit of this, 'Ready, aim, fire: We've just got to get bodies in the door,' " said Andrew Challenger, vice president of outplacement consulting firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas Inc., which helps job seekers.

The rise in phone interviewing is, in many ways, counterintuitive. More advanced hiring techniques exist, such as automated video or text interviews. Some companies, though, have shifted back to voice screenings, finding them more effective, particularly for hourly roles.

The Wisconsin job-recruiting firm Cielo, which hires 150,000 workers annually on behalf of clients, has found applicants far more likely to complete an audio interview than a video one, said Adam Godson, the company's senior vice president of global technology solutions.

Over the phone, applicants needn't worry about their appearance or their location, nor do they have to have access to a smartphone or a computer with a camera, Mr. Godson said.

Some job seekers, though, say they are still acclimating to them. Bob Lichty, a 49-year-old in South Bend, Ind., has taken two automated phone interviews for separate sales director roles at arts organizations in recent months. One lasted 45 minutes. "Phone interviews are hard enough," Mr. Lichty said. "When you throw this automated thing out there, it's like, 'Wow, I have no idea how this is going at all. I don't know if I'm killing it with my dad jokes, or if should I just leave them out.' "

Quest, a Cielo client, uses automated phone interviews to hire phlebotomists, specimen processors and other employees. Lara Gartenberg, Quest's senior director of talent acquisition, said an applicant can take an interview at night, and the person's answers are reviewed by a Cielo representative in the Philippines or Singapore. A U.S. recruiter will find notes the next morning on whether the applicant is a fit and will schedule another interview, if the applicant makes the cut, she said.

HarQen LLC, a 25-person Milwaukee company that makes software behind those automated interviews, has more than 150 clients, from law offices to hospitals and staffing firms, says Suzanne Kinkel, HarQen's president. Allstate and HCA use automated voice interview software made by interviewing-technology firm Montage, said Montage Chief Executive Kurt Heikkinen. Allstate said it has used the technology for several years, while HCA said it uses it on a "limited basis."

Trash-hauler Waste Management Inc. began using on-demand voice interviews a few months ago for most front-line roles, including drivers and technicians. The company has seen a 5- to 7-day improvement in the time it takes candidates to complete a phone interview, which "contributes to a faster hiring process," said Melkeya McDuffie, vice president of talent.

Darlene Racinelli, a Temecula, Calif., financial controller with 30 years of experience, recently had her second automated phone interview. She had applied for a financial controller role at a Texas manufacturer and found automated interviews frustrating because she couldn't ask questions to better understand the company.

When the system asked her to describe her most-difficult challenge -- a stock job-interview question -- she decided she had enough. "At that point," she said, "I hit 9 and just ended it."


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  #12  
Old 11-29-2018, 04:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Westley View Post
So, you would ask the exact same questions of every single person that wants to do sales? And the exact same questions of every single person that wants to do programming? If yes, then you're covered. If not, and you can't explain exactly why you asked each question of each person and how it's completely consistent with all other questioning you did, then you're open to claims of discrimination. And if you can explain exactly why you asked each question that you asked, then you're a liar because that's not how the brain actually works in the course of a conversation.
The whole point of the hiring process is to discriminate people. Something so benign as follow up questions to hobbies will be different since different candidates have different hobbies. I try to avoid the types of discrimination that we could get sued for.
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  #13  
Old 11-29-2018, 05:28 PM
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My employer started doing these a few years ago. I probably wouldn’t be working here if they had started sooner.
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  #14  
Old 11-29-2018, 05:46 PM
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Originally Posted by Childish Gambino View Post
Some advice if you're ever asked for one:
1. Think about what's behind you. I several with an unmade bed or dirty room behind the applicant.
2. Dress for an interview. Literally half were done in bed with the laptop in their pajamas. I was surprised.
...
4. Turn the damn lights on. That's how cameras work.
Eh, sorry to cross-thread reference (I've been in that other thread a bit, so it's on my mind) - but are these things really that different than being an hour early? I don't think so - they're just additional mildly annoying pet peeves moreso than anything else.
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  #15  
Old 11-29-2018, 05:53 PM
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Originally Posted by figure 8 View Post
Eh, sorry to cross-thread reference (I've been in that other thread a bit, so it's on my mind) - but are these things really that different than being an hour early? I don't think so - they're just additional mildly annoying pet peeves moreso than anything else.
Is the way the candidate spends their time outside the interview different than how they conducts themselves during the interview? Yeah, I would think they are significantly different.
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Old 11-29-2018, 05:59 PM
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Originally Posted by figure 8 View Post
Eh, sorry to cross-thread reference (I've been in that other thread a bit, so it's on my mind) - but are these things really that different than being an hour early? I don't think so - they're just additional mildly annoying pet peeves moreso than anything else.
Additionally, getting there early strikes me as a signal that they are very interested in the job. Doing an interview in your PJs makes me think you don't really give a shit.
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Old 11-29-2018, 06:15 PM
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Originally Posted by Childish Gambino View Post
Is the way the candidate spends their time outside the interview different than how they conducts themselves during the interview? Yeah, I would think they are significantly different.
I'd say once they enter the company and let you know they're there, they are no longer "outside the interview." Well, technically the formal questioning hasn't started yet, but they're now conducting themselves in your company's building. For example, if they treat the receptionist like garbage, I wouldn't say that should be ignored just because the actual interview hasn't begun yet.

Also, all those things you mention have essentially nothing to do with performing the job at hand. They're just trivial things. The fact that you say an hour early = eager to get the job, yet PJs mean they don't care only reflects your bias as far as what peeves you and what doesn't. It's all arbitrary, that's all I'm saying. I'm just wanting you to recognize that the earliness is no different than the other things, except you personally happen to have no problem with the earliness. If those minor things you've mentioned in this thread warrant advice, can you at least understand how someone would advise against being too early? (Although I would say that being in PJs is not "minor" - at least put some clothes on, people.)

(Side note: if getting there early = eagerness, at what point is the earliest point that represents eagerness, and any earlier represents being "too early" (desperate, perhaps)?)
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Last edited by figure 8; 11-29-2018 at 06:25 PM..
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  #18  
Old 11-29-2018, 06:29 PM
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Originally Posted by figure 8 View Post
I'd say once they enter the company and let you know they're there, they are no longer "outside the interview." Well, technically the formal questioning hasn't started yet, but they're now conducting themselves in your company's building. For example, if they treat the receptionist like garbage, I wouldn't say that should be ignored just because the actual interview hasn't begun yet.

Also, all those things you mention have essentially nothing to do with performing the job at hand. They're just trivial things. The fact that you say an hour early = eager to get the job, yet PJs mean they don't care only reflects your bias as far as what peeves you and what doesn't. It's all arbitrary, that's all I'm saying. I'm just wanting you to recognize that the earliness is no different than the other things, except you personally happen to have no problem with the earliness. If those minor things you've mentioned in this thread warrant advice, can you at least understand how someone would advise against being too early? (Although I would say that being in PJs is not "minor" - at least put some clothes on, people.)

(Side note: if getting there early = eagerness, at what point is the earliest point that represents eagerness, and any earlier represents being "too early" (desperate, perhaps)?)
You're strawmanning and talking out of both sides of your mouth. Of course being abusive to the receptionist would change things.

And as you admit, doing an interview in your PJs is not minor like showing up a bit early. You could argue that doing the interview in a dirty room is minor but it's part of the presentation which is generally considered to be important. I think this is good advice to hear because it would be easy to throw a suit on but forget yesterday's underwear are right behind you. Turning the light on is definitely minor but I was already making a list and it is apparently not common sense.

I can think of a few negative connotations for getting there early like you know you're terrible at time management and are overcompensating by getting there really early for example. But I tend to give people the benefit of the doubt on stuff like that. Your question is of the form "what is the minimum number of grains of sand to be considered a mound?" I don't really know. Showing up the day before with intentions to sit in the lobby for 24 hours is way too early. One hour is not alarmingly early. It's somewhere between there.
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Old 11-29-2018, 06:38 PM
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TELL ME THE NUMBER OF GRAINS DAMMIT!
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Old 12-04-2018, 06:55 PM
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I've done one way video interviews for Aon and for Chubb. For Aon the question appeared written on the screen, you had unlimited time to think about it and unlimited re records. For Chubb a video of a person reading the question to you appeared on the screen, you had 30 seconds to think and then the single recording began. The Chubb one was much harder and more awkward.
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