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  #31  
Old 01-07-2019, 02:46 PM
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[emoji38]
[emoji38]. Fixed.
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  #32  
Old 01-07-2019, 06:00 PM
CuriousGeorge CuriousGeorge is offline
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I'm not sure it's very different anymore, George. From what I gather, ASA ain't what it used to be.

(Disclaimer: I'm CAS so maybe not well informed on the history of ASA.)
It may be watered down, but it's critically different. An ASA or ACAS can be qualified to make SAOs. An uncredentialed individual cannot. I think that makes a huge difference career-wise.
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  #33  
Old 01-08-2019, 03:41 PM
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What is this watered-down talk? The ASA was strengthened significantly sometime around the mid-90s. Many, perhaps most, current career-ASA's got their designation before then. At that time, the SoA changed the ASA requirement from 200 to 300 credits (out of 450 total needed for FSA). Prior to then, it was really just the "math" exams to get ASA, and so it was a natural stopping point if one had trouble with the essay exams or just didn't want to keep going. Given the SAO's mentioned, this was probably a good change. Now an ASA is so close to FSA that most people who reach ASA will likely have both the ability and motivation to just go ahead and finish up. The SoA basically killed off the career-ASA track with this change.
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  #34  
Old 01-08-2019, 05:04 PM
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The Chief Actuary of Medicare and Medicaid, Paul Spitalnic, is an ASA.

So it is possible to rise high with an ASA, as long as you pick a field that celebrates mediocrity, like Health.

#Life4Life
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  #35  
Old 01-08-2019, 05:06 PM
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Originally Posted by Effa View Post
What is this watered-down talk? The ASA was strengthened significantly sometime around the mid-90s. Many, perhaps most, current career-ASA's got their designation before then. At that time, the SoA changed the ASA requirement from 200 to 300 credits (out of 450 total needed for FSA). Prior to then, it was really just the "math" exams to get ASA, and so it was a natural stopping point if one had trouble with the essay exams or just didn't want to keep going. Given the SAO's mentioned, this was probably a good change. Now an ASA is so close to FSA that most people who reach ASA will likely have both the ability and motivation to just go ahead and finish up. The SoA basically killed off the career-ASA track with this change.
Yeah, I forgot that SOA hasn't made any changes to ASA requirements since the mid-90s.

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  #36  
Old 01-08-2019, 05:26 PM
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Not sure if that was meant to be funny but it made me laugh! I haven't kept up with all the changes, obviously it's pretty different now with the PA exam and modules and who knows what else, but I don't remember anything nearly as significant as that .5 -> 2/3 shift.
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  #37  
Old 01-08-2019, 05:31 PM
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Originally Posted by Effa View Post
Not sure if that was meant to be funny but it made me laugh! I haven't kept up with all the changes, obviously it's pretty different now with the PA exam and modules and who knows what else, but I don't remember anything nearly as significant as that .5 -> 2/3 shift.
Tough for me to comment on the 90s changes (I was only just learning very basic math then...) but at least when I was learning about the paths in detail (~3 years ago, so I think there have been some changes since then), ASA was basically ACAS minus exams 5/6. Assuming you trade exams LC/ST (which became S then MAS I) for MLC and the OCs for any extra minor reqs for ASA, so it was certainly comparatively easier. Not sure how it compared at the fellow level, I never looked that closely at the trip from ASA to FSA.
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  #38  
Old 01-08-2019, 05:38 PM
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Tough for me to comment on the 90s changes (I was only just learning very basic math then...) but at least when I was learning about the paths in detail (~3 years ago, so I think there have been some changes since then), ASA was basically ACAS minus exams 5/6. Assuming you trade exams LC/ST (which became S then MAS I) for MLC and the OCs for any extra minor reqs for ASA, so it was certainly comparatively easier. Not sure how it compared at the fellow level, I never looked that closely at the trip from ASA to FSA.
Do you even FAP, bro?

ETA: unless you're throwing that in among the "extra minor reqs"?
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  #39  
Old 01-08-2019, 05:40 PM
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Do you even FAP, bro?
I figured almost all SOA candidates would have their FAP requirements fulfilled by the end of college.
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  #40  
Old 01-09-2019, 07:36 AM
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I figured almost all SOA candidates would have their FAP requirements fulfilled by the end of college.
I'm pretty sure that's not the case. Modules are $2100, and even then, only if you pass the IA/FA on the first try and do everything fast enough to not warrant an extension. Most college students don't have that kind of money on hand.

Last edited by bannedpianoman; 01-09-2019 at 08:00 AM..
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