Actuarial Outpost
 
Go Back   Actuarial Outpost > Actuarial Discussion Forum > Property - Casualty / General Insurance
FlashChat Actuarial Discussion Preliminary Exams CAS/SOA Exams Cyberchat Around the World Suggestions


Upload your resume securely at https://www.dwsimpson.com
to be contacted when our jobs meet your skills and objectives.


View Poll Results: Will self driving autos kill car insurance?
Of course 44 16.54%
Maybe but not for a long time 193 72.56%
I'm a luddite... 29 10.90%
Voters: 266. You may not vote on this poll

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #2101  
Old 12-18-2018, 09:46 PM
Colymbosathon ecplecticos's Avatar
Colymbosathon ecplecticos Colymbosathon ecplecticos is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 5,998
Default

Adding just a few autonomous vehicles can improve traffic flow.

https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2018...p-traffic-jams
__________________
"What do you mean I don't have the prerequisites for this class? I've failed it twice before!"


"I think that probably clarifies things pretty good by itself."
Reply With Quote
  #2102  
Old 12-20-2018, 09:34 PM
r. mutt's Avatar
r. mutt r. mutt is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Extreme fever swamps of the left
Posts: 10,216
Default

The AV year in review: about what I expected.

https://jalopnik.com/2018-was-a-hard...ars-1831182272
__________________
Bruce
Reply With Quote
  #2103  
Old 12-21-2018, 11:55 AM
twig93's Avatar
twig93 twig93 is offline
Member
SOA
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 30,557
Default

Quote:
the head of Google’s self-driving car unit... believes we still have decades to go before the average person even has access to a self-driving car.
Hey look, this guy gets it!
__________________
Originally Posted by Gandalf
The thing that is clearest is twig's advice
Reply With Quote
  #2104  
Old 01-02-2019, 05:36 PM
campbell's Avatar
campbell campbell is offline
Mary Pat Campbell
SOA AAA
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: NY
Studying for duolingo and coursera
Favorite beer: Murphy's Irish Stout
Posts: 85,614
Blog Entries: 6
Default

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencet...zen-times.html

Quote:
Waymo reveals its Phoenix self-driving cars have been attacked by people wielding rocks, guns and knives nearly two dozen times
Phoenix-area residents have attacked Waymo's self-driving vans with knives, rocks, PVC pipes and guns, while others have attempted to run them off the road
Nearly two dozen such incidents have been recorded since testing began in 2017
Waymo hasn't gone after the assailants and drivers often don't call the police
Spoiler:
Waymo's self-driving minivans have been the target of violence during tests in Phoenix, as some residents object to the rise of autonomous cars in their neighborhood.

Almost two dozen such incidents have been recorded so far, according to the New York Times.

People have pelted the cars with rocks, others scream at the cars and try to run them off the road, while one driver threatened a car with a PVC pipe and another pointed a gun at a Waymo van.

Scroll down for video

Police in Arizona have recorded 21 incidents in the past two years concerning vigilante citizens who have cast rocks, pointed guns at and slashed the tires of Waymo's autonomous vans +4
Police in Arizona have recorded 21 incidents in the past two years concerning vigilante citizens who have cast rocks, pointed guns at and slashed the tires of Waymo's autonomous vans

In another case, a driver drove head-on toward one of the cars until it was forced to stop, the Times reported.

When vehicles are approached by the attackers, the backup drivers are often forced to resume manual mode in the car.

The human monitors who sit as passengers in the vehicles often don't call police, however, as they're trained to handle harassment.

RELATED ARTICLES
Previous
1
Next

'Mom, status is green': NASA scientists celebrate as New...

NASA's Osiris-Rex spacecraft enters orbit around ancient...

NASA spacecraft enters orbit around asteroid, sets records

FOUR BILLION miles from Earth! NASA rings in the new year...
SHARE THIS ARTICLE
Share
11 shares
And Waymo has never pursued prosecution of any of the assailants.

'Safety is the core of everything we do, which means that keeping our drivers, our riders, and the public safe is our top priority,' Alexis Georgeson, the Waymo spokeswoman, told the Times.

'Over the past two years, we've found Arizonans to be welcoming and excited by the potential of this technology to make our roads safer.

The human monitors who sit as passengers in the vehicles often don't call police, however, as they're trained to handle harassment. Waymo hasn't pursued prosecution of the assailants +4
The human monitors who sit as passengers in the vehicles often don't call police, however, as they're trained to handle harassment. Waymo hasn't pursued prosecution of the assailants

'...We report incidents we deem to pose a danger and we have provided photos and videos to local law enforcement when reporting these acts of vandalism or assault.

'We support our drivers and engage in cases where an act of vandalism has been perpetrated against us,' she added.

A report earlier this month from the Arizona Republic further detailed how Waymo vehicles have been attacked.

On August 1st, a test driver in a self-driving vehicle encountered a man aiming a handgun at him, Waymo waited several days to call the police.

While there were no injuries, the man stated that he wanted to scare the Waymo driver.

'(The suspect) stated that he was the person holding up the gun as the Waymo vehicle passed by and that his intentions were to scare the driver,' Detective Cameron Jacobs wrote in a police report after they arrested 69-year-old suspect Roy Leonard Haselton, according to the Arizona Republic.

HOW DOES WAYMO TEST ITS SELF-DRIVING CARS BEFORE PUTTING THEM ON PUBLIC ROADS?
Waymo built 'Castle,' a hidden mock city that can quickly be configured to test different scenarios.

It's located north of the Merced metro area where the Castle Air Force Base used to be an has been rented by Google since 2014.

As part of the initial two-year lease, the firm rented 80 acres from Merced Country for $456,000, being paid in $19,000 monthly installments.

It has different driving environments including residential streets, expressway-style streets, cul-de-sacs, and parking lots.

The Waymo test site is located north of the Merced metro area, where the Castle Air Force Base used to be +4
The Waymo test site is located north of the Merced metro area, where the Castle Air Force Base used to be

At Castle, the roads are named after famous cars, such as DeLorean, Bullitt, Thunderbird, Fury, and Barbaro.

For the structured testing, Waymo looks at how self-driving cars perform on real roads to determine how they need to practice - then they build what's required at Castle.

The fake city has no buildings except one - a converted military dorm Waymo employees sleep in when they're too tired to make it back to San Francisco.

It's hidden, and you need GPS coordinates to find it.

Castle is located north of the Merced metro area where the Castle Air Force Base used to be, 2.5 hours from the company's headquarters. There, Waymo is testing several types of self-driving cars, including Chysler Pacificas minivans +4
Castle is located north of the Merced metro area where the Castle Air Force Base used to be, 2.5 hours from the company's headquarters. There, Waymo is testing several types of self-driving cars, including Chysler Pacificas minivans

'Haselton said that his wife usually keeps the gun locked up in fear that he might shoot somebody.

'Haselton stated that he despises and hates those cars (Waymo) and said how Uber had killed someone,' Jacobs continued in the report.

The attacks against the Waymo vans mark the latest example of growing fears among the public over the rise of autonomous vehicles.

'There’s a growing sense that the giant corporations honing driverless technologies do not have our best interests at heart,' Douglas Rushkoff, a media theorist at the City University of New York, told the Times.

'Just think about the humans inside these vehicles, who are essentially training the artificial intelligence that will replace them.'

Video playing bottom right...
Click here to expand to full page
ADVERTISEMENT

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/12/31/u...a-attacks.html
Quote:
Wielding Rocks and Knives, Arizonans Attack Self-Driving Cars

Spoiler:
CHANDLER, Ariz. — The assailant slipped out of a park around noon one day in October, zeroing in on his target, which was idling at a nearby intersection — a self-driving van operated by Waymo, the driverless-car company spun out of Google.

He carried out his attack with an unidentified sharp object, swiftly slashing one of the tires. The suspect, identified as a white man in his 20s, then melted into the neighborhood on foot.

The slashing was one of nearly two dozen attacks on driverless vehicles over the past two years in Chandler, a city near Phoenix where Waymo started testing its vans in 2017. In ways large and small, the city has had an early look at public misgivings over the rise of artificial intelligence, with city officials hearing complaints about everything from safety to possible job losses.

Some people have pelted Waymo vans with rocks, according to police reports. Others have repeatedly tried to run the vehicles off the road. One woman screamed at one of the vans, telling it to get out of her suburban neighborhood. A man pulled up alongside a Waymo vehicle and threatened the employee riding inside with a piece of PVC pipe.

ADVERTISEMENT


In one of the more harrowing episodes, a man waved a .22-caliber revolver at a Waymo vehicle and the emergency backup driver at the wheel. He told the police that he “despises” driverless cars, referring to the killing of a female pedestrian in March in nearby Tempe by a self-driving Uber car.

“There are other places they can test,” said Erik O’Polka, 37, who was issued a warning by the police in November after multiple reports that his Jeep Wrangler had tried to run Waymo vans off the road — in one case, driving head-on toward one of the self-driving vehicles until it was forced to come to an abrupt stop.

You have 4 free articles remaining.

Subscribe to The Times
His wife, Elizabeth, 35, admitted in an interview that her husband “finds it entertaining to brake hard” in front of the self-driving vans, and that she herself “may have forced them to pull over” so she could yell at them to get out of their neighborhood. The trouble started, the couple said, when their 10-year-old son was nearly hit by one of the vehicles while he was playing in a nearby cul-de-sac.

“They said they need real-world examples, but I don’t want to be their real-world mistake,” said Mr. O’Polka, who runs his own company providing information technology to small businesses.

A pedestrian was struck and killed by a self-driving Uber vehicle at the intersection of Mill Avenue and Curry Road in Tempe, Ariz., in March.
Credit
Caitlin O'Hara for The New York Times


Image
A pedestrian was struck and killed by a self-driving Uber vehicle at the intersection of Mill Avenue and Curry Road in Tempe, Ariz., in March.CreditCaitlin O'Hara for The New York Times
“They didn’t ask us if we wanted to be part of their beta test,” added his wife, who helps run the business.

ADVERTISEMENT


At least 21 such attacks have been leveled at Waymo vans in Chandler, as first reported by The Arizona Republic. Some analysts say they expect more such behavior as the nation moves into a broader discussion about the potential for driverless cars to unleash colossal changes in American society. The debate touches on fears ranging from eliminating jobs for drivers to ceding control over mobility to autonomous vehicles.

“People are lashing out justifiably," said Douglas Rushkoff, a media theorist at City University of New York and author of the book “Throwing Rocks at the Google Bus.” He likened driverless cars to robotic incarnations of scabs — workers who refuse to join strikes or who take the place of those on strike.

“There’s a growing sense that the giant corporations honing driverless technologies do not have our best interests at heart,” Mr. Rushkoff said. “Just think about the humans inside these vehicles, who are essentially training the artificial intelligence that will replace them.”

The emergency drivers in the Waymo vans that were attacked in various cases told the Chandler police that the company preferred not to pursue prosecution of the assailants.

In some of their reports, police officers also said Waymo was often unwilling to provide video of the attacks. In one case, a Waymo employee told the police they would need a warrant to obtain video recorded by the company’s vehicles.

Officer William Johnson of the Chandler Police Department described in a June report how the driver of a Chrysler PT Cruiser wove between lanes of traffic while taunting a Waymo van.

A manager at Waymo showed video images of the incident to Officer Johnson but did not allow the police to keep them for a more thorough investigation. According to Officer Johnson’s report, the manager said that the company did not want to pursue the matter, emphasizing that Waymo was worried about disruptions of its testing in Chandler.

The report said Waymo was concerned about the effect the attacks were having on its emergency drivers, who are intended to remain in monitoring mode. “The behavior is causing the drivers to resume manual mode over the automated mode because of concerns about what the driver of the other vehicle may do,” Officer Johnson wrote.

The emergency drivers in the Waymo vans that were attacked told the Chandler police that the company preferred not to pursue prosecution of the assailants.
Credit
Jason Henry for The New York Times


Image

The emergency drivers in the Waymo vans that were attacked told the Chandler police that the company preferred not to pursue prosecution of the assailants.CreditJason Henry for The New York Times
In a statement, a Waymo spokeswoman said the attacks involved only a small fraction of the more than 25,000 miles that the company’s vans log every day in Arizona.

“Safety is the core of everything we do, which means that keeping our drivers, our riders, and the public safe is our top priority,” said Alexis Georgeson, the Waymo spokeswoman. “Over the past two years, we've found Arizonans to be welcoming and excited by the potential of this technology to make our roads safer.”

Ms. Georgeson said the company took the safety of its emergency drivers seriously and disputed claims that Waymo was trying to avoid bad publicity by opting against pursuing criminal charges.

“We report incidents we deem to pose a danger and we have provided photos and videos to local law enforcement when reporting these acts of vandalism or assault,” Ms. Georgeson said. “We support our drivers and engage in cases where an act of vandalism has been perpetrated against us.”

The authorities in Chandler and elsewhere in Arizona remain gladly open to Waymo and other driverless-car companies. Rob Antoniak, the chief operating officer of Valley Metro, which helps oversee the Phoenix metropolitan area’s transit system, said on Twitter that Arizona was still welcoming autonomous cars with “open arms” despite the attacks on Waymo vans.

“Don't let individual criminals throwing rocks or slashing tires derail efforts to drive the future of transportation,” Mr. Antoniak said.

ADVERTISEMENT


But the official welcome mat has failed to persuade the naysayers.

One of them, Charles Pinkham, 37, was standing in the street in front of a Waymo vehicle in Chandler one evening in August when he was approached by the police.

“Pinkham was heavily intoxicated, and his demeanor varied from calm to belligerent and agitated during my contact with him,” Officer Richard Rimbach wrote in his report. “He stated he was sick and tired of the Waymo vehicles driving in his neighborhood, and apparently thought the best idea to resolve this was to stand in front of these vehicles.”

It worked, apparently. The Waymo employee inside the van, Candice Dunson, opted against filing charges and told the police that the company preferred to stop routing vehicles to the area.

Mr. Pinkham got a warning. The van moved on.


__________________
It's STUMP

LinkedIn Profile
Reply With Quote
  #2105  
Old 01-02-2019, 07:30 PM
Gonzo's Avatar
Gonzo Gonzo is offline
Member
SOA
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: gonzo.
Studying for gonzo?
Favorite beer: gonzo!
Posts: 8,710
Default

wow, actual luddites
Reply With Quote
  #2106  
Old 01-03-2019, 09:36 AM
JohnLocke's Avatar
JohnLocke JohnLocke is offline
Member
SOA
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 16,352
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by r. mutt View Post
The AV year in review: about what I expected.

https://jalopnik.com/2018-was-a-hard...ars-1831182272
Quote:
But we do know it will be decades before the technology is ready to go mainstream, though they’ll likely never be prepared for every driving condition.
Maybe, maybe not. The fact that autonomous vehicles are as good as they are came out of nowhere and within a short period of time. A little bit of humility is in order when proclaiming what must happen in the future.

This article is the exact opposite of most autonomous vehicle articles: super-pessimistic to the extent that it undermines its own credibility.

Machine learning may (and inevitably will) stop being such a hotbed for innovation and hit a plateau after we capture all the low hanging fruit... but until that happens (and it definitely wasn't in 2018) we won't know how high that plateau is.
__________________
i always post when i'm in a shitty mood. if i didn't do that, i'd so rarely post. --AO Fan

Lucky for you I was raised by people with a good moral center because if that were not the case, you guys would be in a lot of trouble.
So be very, very glad people like me exist. Your future basically depends on it. --jas66kent

The stock market is going to go up significantly due to Trump Economics --jas66kent
Reply With Quote
  #2107  
Old 01-03-2019, 04:29 PM
Gonzo's Avatar
Gonzo Gonzo is offline
Member
SOA
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: gonzo.
Studying for gonzo?
Favorite beer: gonzo!
Posts: 8,710
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnLocke View Post
Maybe, maybe not. The fact that autonomous vehicles are as good as they are came out of nowhere and within a short period of time. A little bit of humility is in order when proclaiming what must happen in the future.

This article is the exact opposite of most autonomous vehicle articles: super-pessimistic to the extent that it undermines its own credibility.

Machine learning may (and inevitably will) stop being such a hotbed for innovation and hit a plateau after we capture all the low hanging fruit... but until that happens (and it definitely wasn't in 2018) we won't know how high that plateau is.


we've come to the sudden realization that we are just skimming the surface of AI, and that the human (or animal, for that matter) brain was way underrated
Reply With Quote
  #2108  
Old 01-14-2019, 09:44 AM
campbell's Avatar
campbell campbell is offline
Mary Pat Campbell
SOA AAA
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: NY
Studying for duolingo and coursera
Favorite beer: Murphy's Irish Stout
Posts: 85,614
Blog Entries: 6
Default

https://www.wired.com/story/tesla-pr...ing-education/

Quote:
A TESLA-ROBOT ‘CRASH’ STUNT SHOWS WE NEED ROBOCAR SCHOOLING
Spoiler:
ON MONDAY, THE opening day of the annual Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, tragedy struck. Or didn’t. According to a Russian robotics company, one of its humanoid products was toodling on its way to its exhibit when it was hit by a Tesla Model S in “full self-driving capability.” Poor "Promobot" will never recover, the company wrote in a press release, later reported on by a handful of publications, tabloids, and blogs. It said the police were investigating in the incident.

Or weren’t. Aden Ocampo Gomez, a public information officer with the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department, said he couldn’t find any record of such an incident. And anyway, he says, the department "doesn't report that kind of incident on private property.”

If you’re thinking that this might have been a publicity stunt, well, so are lots of people. Teslas don’t have a “full self-driving” mode. Autopilot, the automaker’s semiautonomous system, is made for highways, not the sort of private road shown in a video of the alleged crash published by the robotics company. Promobot seems to start falling over just a moment before the car gets to it. And that video appears to show a rope snaking away from the incident—the sort that could be used, say, to pull down a robot that hadn’t been hit by a car at all. The company, also called Promobot, did not respond to a request for comment. Tesla declined to comment.


In the vast madness of CES, publicity stunts are de rigeur. What's striking about this one is that it played on a criticism of Elon Musk's ever-in-the-headlines company: that Tesla doesn't do enough to ensure its customers know the limitations of Autopilot, which needs constant human supervision. And research shows that the general public is rather confused about what "self-driving" means in different contexts.

So it's auspicious that elsewhere in Vegas, a handful of those actually involved in the self-driving industry were gearing up to fight exactly the sort of robotic misconceptions that made the company’s story so very sexy. On Monday, a group of automated vehicle developers, suppliers, and advocacy groups rolled out a new coalition for public education on automated vehicles, called the Partnership for Automated Vehicle Education, or PAVE.

“Media interest is picking up, public attention is dialing in, and people are, understandably, a bit confused,” Kyle Vogt, chief technology officer at the AV developer Cruise, said of automated vehicle technology in a press conference Monday. (Cruise and its parent company, General Motors, are members of the coalition.) “There’s a lot misinformation floating around, and it’s on all of us, especially this group here, to help correct that.”

Indeed: Contrary to commentary, headlines, and marketing from the tech developers themselves, there are zero self-driving cars available for purchase today. Similarly, there are zero self-driving cars ferrying passengers around—even Waymo still has safety drivers in the vehicles’ front seats, monitoring the technology for hiccups. (The company says it has tested some totally self-driving vehicles in Arizona, without anyone behind the wheel, but hasn’t put members of the public in them yet.) But here’s the confusing part: Carmakers like Audi, GM, and Nissan do offer advanced driver assistance features that keep the car in its lane and away from other vehicles—which can feel a whole lot like the car is driving itself. Research indicates these systems can and do make driving much safer—but that consumers aren’t always sure about their limitations, or how they work.

LEARN MORE

THE WIRED GUIDE TO SELF-DRIVING CARS
According to its website, PAVE is meant to “ inform and educate the public and policymakers on the facts regarding driverless vehicles so that they can fully participate in shaping the future of our roads and highways.” The coalition involves a number of self-driving developers (Audi, Aurora, Waymo, Toyota, Voyage, Zoox), carmakers (VW, Daimler), suppliers (Nvidia, Mobileye, Intel, Inrix) industry organizations (the Society of Automotive Engineers, the American Public Transportation Association, the US Chamber of Commerce) and advocacy groups (the National Federation of the Blind, the Council on Aging, Securing America’s Energy Future).

Deborah Hersman, the current president of the National Safety Coalition and the incoming head of safety at Waymo, stressed Monday that the group was not formed to lobby governments, but to actually teach people about how self-driving works. “Policymakers and the public must be informed about the real benefits and limitations of automated vehicles,” she said Monday.

The group aims to create educational materials for dealers who, according to research and reports, have had a hard time explaining the capabilities of the advanced driver assistance features available in passenger vehicles today. It says it will set up “hands on” demos for the public and policymakers, so people can actually get into the developing tech and understand how it works. It says it will partner with academic institutions to give policymakers opportunities to learn. Gordon Trowbridge, a spokesperson for PAVE, says details on these efforts are slated to be released in the next few months.

Since a testing self-driving Uber hit and killed a pedestrian nearly a year ago, surveys suggest that regular people are a bit freaked out by the technology. (Undoubtedly, this latent fear is partly why the robotic company’s story got media attention. Also, robot on robot violence is fun.) Lawmakers are, too: the fatal crash brought federal legislation that would have guided the development of self-driving vehicles screeching to stop. It still hasn’t passed. So there is great incentive for the industry to teach people about what it's doing. And hopefully no more robots have to fake their own murders for everyone to start paying attention.


https://www.wired.com/story/self-dri...omous-veoneer/

Quote:
AS SELF-DRIVING CARS STALL, PLAYERS REVIVE AN OLD APPROACH

Spoiler:
ALONG WITH ROBOT butlers, billboard-sized TVs, and inadequately sanitized wearables being tried on by untold hordes, self-driving demonstrations have become a staple of CES. As the show takes over Las Vegas, the Strip, hotel parking lots, and side streets play host to robo-vehicles with spinning sensors on the roof, pods with splashy logos, and even autonomous Lyfts. Usually, these demos go the same way: You sit in the back and try to glean whatever you can from a carefully staged ride.

So it was odd to find myself this week in the driver’s seat of a Lincoln MKZ that looked like a full self-driver, sensors and bold logos included. And I was being told not just that I’d have to drive, but that I would be monitored—and graded—on my concentration, trust, and emotional state.

This metallic blue sedan is the Learning Intelligent Vehicle, and the computer and I are going to drive it together, which, rather than full autonomy, is what many serious players in the self-driving space now think is a realistic near-term goal.

This step-by-step approach to autonomy, where the machine gradually takes over the work of driving, started to go out of fashion in 2012, when Google’s self-driving project (now Waymo) decided it was safer to go full-robo than to find a way to make the human and computer work together effectively. Much of the auto industry reached the same conclusion over the next few years, even vowing to take the steering wheel and pedals out of their cars.

The mastery to land that moonshot, though, has proven elusive, even in carefully prescribed areas like the Phoenix suburbs where Waymo operates. And so the gradual approach, built on capabilities that are achievable in the near-term, is making something of a comeback, with a focus on the human-machine interaction.


“The industry has realized this elephant has to be eaten in smaller bites," Veoneer CTO Nishant Batra says. JASON LOUDERMILK/VEONEER
“The expectations that the industry had are now significantly pushed out,” says Nishant Batra, chief technology officer of Veoneer, the outfit that built the Learning Intelligent Vehicle, or LIV 3.0. Veoneer spun off from safety-focused industry supplier Autoliv in 2018, to focus on self-driving and driver assistance features. “The big—I don’t want to say hype—but expectation around full autonomy has not come through,” Batra says. But, he thinks, smaller steps toward autonomy can improve safety and convenience for drivers in the here and now.

Indeed, many autonomy-focused companies in Vegas this week say that drivers should expect to see assistance features that require human interaction or oversight, first. They use the same sensors and sort of software as more capable cars, but can be certified and put on the market right about now. “The industry has realized this elephant has to be eaten in smaller bites,” Batra says.

One of the first mouthfuls is monitoring the driver for distraction. So on my ride, Veoneer engineer Constantin Coestr, riding shotgun, asks me to name each landmark I drive past. Seems easy enough. “The Eiffel Tower. Walmart. Sydney Opera House,” I call out. “Cher. Elvis. This is hard.” Although you probably could see facsimiles of those things (maybe with a real Walmart) on a typical drive through Vegas, we’re on a closed circuit behind the convention center, passing by painted signs and inflatable buildings. “You’re driving too slowly,” says Coestr, but as I try to focus on the world outside, and keep pace while staying on the road, a robotic female voice booms from the speakers.

“You seem distracted,” it says. “I’m going to take over. Autonomous drive active.” Bright green LEDs light up around the rim of the steering wheel, and the car starts moving automatically. Demoted but relieved, I sit back and enjoy the view. Oh, there’s the White House!

This is a core function of LIV. Using an infrared camera above the center stack, the car’s computer monitors the driver, looking for distraction or confusion, or even anger or happiness, by interpreting face and head position, and pupil size. If it determines you’re distracted, it suggests you let it take over. If you’re really having trouble—like I was—it just takes over. Veoneer calls this “collaborative driving,” and it’s the sort of system most car buyers will experience long before they get to ride in a fully autonomous car. If, that is, Veoneer can convince automakers to take it on.


Collaborative systems like Veoneer's LIV, which offer help when and where they can, are one possibility for a limited vision of self-driving cars. JASON LOUDERMILK/VEONEER
Regardless of what Veoneer pulls off, drivers already have access to systems like Tesla Autopilot and Cadillac Supercruise, which on the highway can handle the driving, but require constant human supervision. Progress will eventually demote the human from overseer to backup, for when the computer encounters conditions it can’t handle. And as the human role diminishes, the mechanisms for handing control back and forth will have to get more sophisticated.

“The industry now needs to be really responsible and mature,” says Dennis Nobelius, CEO of Zenuity, a joint venture Autoliv and Volvo created to develop autonomous and driver assistance features. “You need to be really clear that, now the driver is responsible, or now the car is responsible,” he says. “We don’t know exactly how that looks today.” Collaborative systems like the LIV, offering help when and where they can, are one possibility.

My drive in Veoneer’s car wasn’t perfect. The automated system, for example called out every stop sign. I prefer the old-fashioned method of seeing those with my eyes. Eventually, the engineers say, the computer would learn that the reminders irritate me, and quit them. (In my case, the best driver monitoring would pick up on eye rolls and gritted teeth.)

The demo did prove, though, that there are ways to improve my interaction with a car and the environment. And it showed that however long it takes for the car to do all the driving, we won’t have to wait so long to offload some of the work onto the machine.


__________________
It's STUMP

LinkedIn Profile
Reply With Quote
  #2109  
Old 01-14-2019, 09:52 AM
campbell's Avatar
campbell campbell is offline
Mary Pat Campbell
SOA AAA
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: NY
Studying for duolingo and coursera
Favorite beer: Murphy's Irish Stout
Posts: 85,614
Blog Entries: 6
Default

One can make predictions in the 2018-2019 vehicle innovations challenge...

https://www.gjopen.com/challenges/31...ebec-211445021

Here are some of the questions:
https://www.gjopen.com/questions/104...ebec-211445021
Quote:
Between 1 January 2019 and 31 December 2019, how many reports of traffic accidents involving an autonomous vehicle will the California Department of Motor Vehicles receive?

https://www.gjopen.com/questions/103...ebec-211445021
Quote:
Before 1 January 2020, will the U.S. President sign legislation increasing the number of exemptions for autonomous vehicles allowed per manufacturer by the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards?

https://www.gjopen.com/questions/105...ebec-211445021
Quote:
Before 1 January 2020, will General Motors launch a ride-hailing service open to the public in the U.S. which uses autonomous vehicles?

__________________
It's STUMP

LinkedIn Profile
Reply With Quote
  #2110  
Old 01-14-2019, 10:50 AM
itGetsBetter itGetsBetter is offline
Member
CAS AAA
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Midwest
Studying for Exam 9
Favorite beer: Spruce Springsteen
Posts: 85
Default

Thank you for the articles.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:09 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
*PLEASE NOTE: Posts are not checked for accuracy, and do not
represent the views of the Actuarial Outpost or its sponsors.
Page generated in 0.18836 seconds with 13 queries