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  #21  
Old 08-11-2016, 04:46 PM
angryleslieknope angryleslieknope is offline
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Originally Posted by redearedslider View Post
I can tell you from experience that at least the site sponsor will.
Yeah, DW Simpson posted a job and I filled the info form and one of their EL folks called me and we chatted for about 15 minutes. Nothing super exciting.
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  #22  
Old 08-11-2016, 04:54 PM
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AbedNadir AbedNadir is offline
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if you get priced out of entry level jobs, then try to get a non-entry level job? isn't that better?
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  #23  
Old 08-11-2016, 04:58 PM
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Originally Posted by Lorenzo Von Matterhorn View Post
I've never even heard of a recruiter talking to EL candidates..

Either way, every single EL candidate out there has at least two exams. With three exams, a company may end up having to pay you an extra couple thousand bucks in starting salary.. Depending on the student program at the company, that would probably cost them less than hiring a two exam student, then paying for all their study materials, exam fees and days off for studying for the third exam.

Get through your exams as quickly as possible. Worry about slowing down when you're done with P, FM, MFE and C, and need to know whether or not your CAS or SOA before moving on.


Race to four exams. There is very little reason not to. You wont price yourself out of a job. The likely scenario is that the employer would just offer you less and get a candidate with more exams for cheaper (assuming all else equal).
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  #24  
Old 08-11-2016, 05:36 PM
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Originally Posted by AbedNadir View Post
if you get priced out of entry level jobs, then try to get a non-entry level job? isn't that better?
there was a guy who used to post a lot maybe a couple months ago who kept applying to mid level jobs with <1 year experience and couldn't figure out why he wasn't getting any of them
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ASM does not have a discussion of stimulation, but considering how boring the manual is, maybe it would be a good idea.
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  #25  
Old 08-23-2016, 03:22 PM
Hartke Hartke is offline
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We had a candidate come in saying he wasn't studying for an exam, but could easily pass one if wanted. He hadn't passed an exam in over a year. He was overconfident about everything, but had clearly done no research about our company or the position. Dropped several F bombs during the lunch interview.

Doesnt sound like the OP, but usually I like to see recent exam progress and an active desire to continue that process (IE have your next exam sitting setup)
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  #26  
Old 08-23-2016, 03:38 PM
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We had a candidate come in saying he wasn't studying for an exam, but could easily pass one if wanted. He hadn't passed an exam in over a year. He was overconfident about everything, but had clearly done no research about our company or the position. Dropped several F bombs during the lunch interview.

Doesnt sound like the OP, but usually I like to see recent exam progress and an active desire to continue that process (IE have your next exam sitting setup)


He was trying fake it till you make it
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Originally Posted by Abraham Weishaus View Post
ASM does not have a discussion of stimulation, but considering how boring the manual is, maybe it would be a good idea.
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  #27  
Old 08-24-2016, 02:15 PM
Hartke Hartke is offline
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He was trying fake it till you make it
must have gotten his advice from MBAoutpost.com
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  #28  
Old 08-27-2016, 12:33 PM
DBactuary DBactuary is offline
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I'm late to this thread, but just my own opinion, which seems to be in opposition to what many of you are saying:

As an interviewer and involved in the hiring process for my company (one of the largest consulting firms) for a number of years (while a student, ASA and FSA), pricing yourself out of a job DOES happen. It can be based on a combination of prior experience (educational or other careers) and exam progress.

Looking at internship and entry level candidate resumes, we do get concerned when a student has too many exams.
A) We don't want to pay as much for this opening as the student may think they're worth in the market, based on those exams
B) We begin to worry if this person has a lot of exams but hasn't yet been able to find a job. i.e. if they're so great at this, why haven't they found a job earlier when they had less exams (the "normal" amount)?
So I do agree with the advice you were given. However, I don't think there's a huge difference with this one extra exam. This is a bigger consideration when looking at someone with 1-2 exams vs. 4-5 exams. The other consideration for you is that more realistically, you'll probably just miss out on that theoretical exam raise. If Company X is hiring for a position with 2 exams, they have a set salary in mind. If you have 3-4 exams, you might get a little more, but you probably won't get that originally planned base salary plus the equivalent of the exam raises in their study program. Then you'll be in the program and get raises, but it just means you miss out on a small amount. HOWEVER, it's not a big deal and should not be a determining factor in your job decision.

To answer your initial question, I don't think you need to push that information out on everyone that you're planning to take the exam soon, but if you start discussing exams and experience, they'll like to see that you have a plan. BUT as someone else said, PLEASE DON'T COME OFF AS OVERLY CONFIDENT about your ability to pass this exam whenever you want. Maybe that's true, maybe it's not, but in the end, the interviewers are looking for someone that will be good at the job but also someone that they'd want to work with every single day. You can let them know that you expect to have a good shot at it, but be careful the way you word that.
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