Actuarial Outpost
 
Go Back   Actuarial Outpost > Actuarial Discussion Forum > Careers - Employment
FlashChat Actuarial Discussion Preliminary Exams CAS/SOA Exams Cyberchat Around the World Suggestions



Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #21  
Old 08-07-2013, 07:33 PM
lllj's Avatar
lllj lllj is offline
Member
CAS
 
Join Date: May 2011
Studying for Exam 9
Posts: 5,160
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ditkaworshipper View Post
You'd be surprised how many actuaries don't really keep up with the exam system once they finish. If he was hurting with space I'd go your way, but since he's already committing 1 line per exam on the resume, it's not going to crowd anything else out. For the people who know the exam system, it won't hurt him because they can still breeze through the parts they need to without delays. For the people that don't know the exams, it will help a lot.
Agree to disagree. I completely understand that older actuaries don't keep up with the changing exam system. But I think that if they are reading entry-level resumes, they'll be up to speed in about 30 seconds. Listing out the topic names seems unnecessarily wordy. And there's no way that not writing them out could hurt him in any way, being that every other candidate will not be writing them out.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 08-07-2013, 08:07 PM
twig93's Avatar
twig93 twig93 is offline
Member
SOA
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 30,285
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joshuary View Post
Thanks for your reply. I had them originally in my exam section. Do you think they should go back there, or do you prefer them in the school section?
I think VEEs belong in the exam section. They are part of the exam process, even though they are not exams themselves.

Quote:
Originally Posted by zeus1233 View Post
Second place in the math contest is a little bit too much like "second prize in a beauty contest" from Monopoly. I'd get rid of it.
It might be worth mentioning if it is a semi-prestigious contest that involves more than just the OP's college. (I didn't peruse the resume, so I don't know if this is clear.) It doesn't hurt on a light resume and gives something to talk about in the interview. More detail might be nice: "second place in a nation-wide math contest to determine creative uses for Fourier series" isn't a bad bullet point IMO.

Agree with listing GPA in major if it is higher.

As for the original question:
Quote:
So here is my dilemma: Do I accept this job if offered even though I have better potential possibilities within just a couple of months, or even soon from companies that haven't contacted me yet? Do you think this type of job will even assist me on my path to be an actuary?
A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush, and in this economy, maybe 20. You said you originally applied there for an EL actuarial position, which means that the company A) hires actuaries and B) knows that you'll be looking to move up at some point. Take the job - and this is the really important part - kick ass in the job you're hired to do so that your manager and co-workers say good things about you, learn as much as you can about the company, products, software (especially company-specific software like claims systems, how data is stored, even understanding how to access physical files). Try to get to know the actuaries. Participate in every cross-company event that you can think of: volunteer at the food bank as part of the annual giving campaign, play on the company softball team or if you can't play - offer to keep score, join the safety committee, participate in the mentoring program, read to under-priviledged kids once a month, go to the optional classes on the history of the company or "learn about what this other department does", network every possible way that you can think of while still being effective at the job you were hired to do. It might take 12-18 months, but you're earning money and building tenure (which will ultimately help with things like retirement vesting, earning more vacation, getting a cushy parking space) and making yourself into a more valuable actuary in the meantime. Obviously continue to prepare for and pass exams.

After you've been on the job for three to six months, call an actuary or two and ask if they can help you schedule an informational interview. If you notice an applicable opening, this is a good time to contact them and say something along the lines of "I was wondering what it would take to get a position such as this one", and see where it goes.

Don't flaunt it that you're going to ditch your current job at the first available opportunity, but you don't have to hide it either. As long as you're kicking butt in your current job, your boss will most likely understand that this isn't your long-term place in the company and will try to help you and be happy that he/she got some quality work out of you for a while.

What you want to have happen is for the actuarial manager to be the one who decides that (s)he just has to have you and then (s)he's the one working it out with HR that you're going to leave your current position after only X months and smoothing it over with your old boss.
__________________
Originally Posted by Gandalf
The thing that is clearest is twig's advice
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 08-07-2013, 08:19 PM
twig93's Avatar
twig93 twig93 is offline
Member
SOA
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 30,285
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by zeus1233 View Post
Be aware that people who didn't go to your college will be reading your resume.
This one seems obvious to me, but it never ceases to amaze me how many people assume that the interviewer will understand some college-specific gobbledy-gook on a resume.

It's really bad in my state because every state university has the same course numbering system. Candidates from those universities therefore assume that every actuary in the state understands what "Math 389" means. It's like it never even dawned on them that I might have gone to a college that is not an in-state school in this particular state. Or worse, they are so insulated from the outside world that they think Math 389 is the exact same course at every single university the world over!

I remember telling a candidate that my university did actually offer Differential Equations, but it wasn't Math 389... no, DiffEq was Math 347 where I went to school. This completely blew the candidate's mind.

(Note, I don't actually know that Math 389 is Differential Equations at the in-state universities... I made the number up, but you catch my drift. I'm pretty sure it was Math 347 at my school, but I wouldn't even swear to that.)
__________________
Originally Posted by Gandalf
The thing that is clearest is twig's advice

Last edited by twig93; 08-07-2013 at 08:27 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 08-07-2013, 08:28 PM
lllj's Avatar
lllj lllj is offline
Member
CAS
 
Join Date: May 2011
Studying for Exam 9
Posts: 5,160
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by twig93 View Post
This one seems obvious to me, but it never ceases to amaze me how many people assume that the interviewer will understand some college-specific gobbledy-gook on a resume.

It's really bad in my state because every state university has the same course numbering system. Candidates from those universities therefore assume that every actuary in the state understands what "Math 389" means. It's like it never even dawned on them that I might have gone to a college that is not an in-state school in this particular state. Or worse, they are so insulated from the outside world that they think Math 389 is the exact same course at every single university the world over!

I remember telling a candidate that my university did actually offer Differential Equations, but it wasn't Math 389... no, DiffEq was Math 347 where I went to school. This completely blew the candidate's mind.

(Note, I don't actually know that Math 389 is Differential Equations at the in-state universities... I made the number up, but you catch my drift. I'm pretty sure it was Math 347 at my school, but I wouldn't even swear to that.)
lol. It always baffles me that people always call their courses by number anyway. We never did that at my school. Linear algebra was just linear algebra, real analysis was just real analysis, etc. Seems like an additional chore to be memorizing course numbers. The only day I knew my course numbers was the day I registered for classes. Seems to be common practice though.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 08-07-2013, 08:39 PM
twig93's Avatar
twig93 twig93 is offline
Member
SOA
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 30,285
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by lllj View Post
lol. It always baffles me that people always call their courses by number anyway. We never did that at my school. Linear algebra was just linear algebra, real analysis was just real analysis, etc. Seems like an additional chore to be memorizing course numbers. The only day I knew my course numbers was the day I registered for classes. Seems to be common practice though.
I memorized weird stuff like that without even trying. I mean, to this day I could probably tell you my schedule, teacher, and approximate location in the building for every single class in every single grade from Kindergarten through graduate school. Yes, there is something wrong with me!
__________________
Originally Posted by Gandalf
The thing that is clearest is twig's advice
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 08-09-2013, 09:04 PM
Joshuary's Avatar
Joshuary Joshuary is offline
Member
CAS SOA
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Atlanta, GA
College: GSU Alumni
Posts: 73
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by twig93 View Post
I memorized weird stuff like that without even trying. I mean, to this day I could probably tell you my schedule, teacher, and approximate location in the building for every single class in every single grade from Kindergarten through graduate school. Yes, there is something wrong with me!
I know exactly what you are saying. I won't be able to recall specific numbers, but I can recall the patterns and trends they might have had. On a test my buddy and I had, there was a problem we did the month before in the SOA practice questions. He instantly recalled the exact numerical answer, and I recalled the exact process. Between the two of us, we can come up with just about any answer. Lol
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 08-09-2013, 09:47 PM
Joshuary's Avatar
Joshuary Joshuary is offline
Member
CAS SOA
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Atlanta, GA
College: GSU Alumni
Posts: 73
Default

I cannot thank you all enough for your invaluable input. I have made most of the changes you have all suggested, and my resume looks much more organized and professional. I have taken all of your suggestions to heart, and a few suggestions I plan on still implementing after I decide how to approach it exactly/accurately (ie: sales improvement stats. etc.). This comes just in time, as I'm finally getting some responses and they want a soft copy resume for themselves. Hopefully I will be lucky enough to count myself as an actuary alongside you fine gentlemen/ladies soon. Thank you all again, and here is an updated progress resume if you are curious.

Last edited by Joshuary; 07-02-2015 at 07:38 PM..
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
career advice, resume critique, tl;dr

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:58 AM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
*PLEASE NOTE: Posts are not checked for accuracy, and do not
represent the views of the Actuarial Outpost or its sponsors.
Page generated in 0.33665 seconds with 10 queries