Actuarial Outpost
 
Go Back   Actuarial Outpost > Actuarial Discussion Forum > Health - Disability
FlashChat Actuarial Discussion Preliminary Exams CAS/SOA Exams Cyberchat Around the World Suggestions


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #61  
Old 08-24-2017, 02:54 PM
Locrian Locrian is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 1,628
Default

That's awful. And there's been a LOT of it over the last few years. I remember personally finding clinics in several midwestern states + georgia all bilking insurance companies. They weren't even that sneaky about it.
__________________
Spoiler:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andreas View Post
The most important thing I have learned from the career forum is that the gurus in this field and keepers of supreme knowledge regarding all matters pertaining to the actuarial profession are unlettered actuarial students with < 5 years of experience.
Reply With Quote
  #62  
Old 09-11-2017, 10:16 AM
Size17's Avatar
Size17 Size17 is offline
Member
SOA AAA
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Tennessee
Studying for nuthin
College: University of St. Thomas
Favorite beer: Alaskan Amber
Posts: 269
Default

Is anyone familiar with how the Academy approaches its public policy communications?

http://www.actuary.org/category/site...-policy/health

Perhaps this is a good avenue to put an actuarial perspective out in the world. probably costs to healthcare system seems the most appropriate angle, but I wonder if there are other datapoints related to prevalence and effectiveness of opiods as well.
__________________
"For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple, and wrong." -HL Mencken
Reply With Quote
  #63  
Old 09-18-2017, 02:51 AM
FormLetter's Avatar
FormLetter FormLetter is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 48,468
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bigb View Post
How exactly is it that "actuaries" can solve an opioid crisis? How many other crisis' exist in the health sector that "actuaries" have been exposed to now for decades? Clinician's seem to be in an infinitely better position to address this issue. Its like asking us why doctors are writing scripts.
It's not just doctors writings prescriptions.

Oftentimes there are leaks from manufacturers where massive amounts of pills are stolen at a time. Some employee figures out an opportunity point in the manufacturing/inventory process and manages to sneak out a garbage bag full of the huge pill bottles that are in the locked cabinets behind the counter at retail pharmacies.
__________________
Come join the AO Rap Battle Tournament 2013:
http://www.actuarialoutpost.com/actu...33#post7082433
Reply With Quote
  #64  
Old 09-18-2017, 02:54 AM
FormLetter's Avatar
FormLetter FormLetter is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 48,468
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by WhosOnFirst View Post
I think the OP was trying to show that the risk prediction methodologies that actuaries are very familiar with could help with opioid addiction. I inferred that that he believes that being able to predict who might get addicted in the first place could be of use to prevent future addiction. That would appear to be a realm where actuaries are better suite then clinicians.

I'm not positive I buy into the idea of being able to reduce addiction by predicting who might become an addict. My bias is towards viewing addiction as a medical condition which means my preference for solving any addiction would be through a better understanding of the biological processes that create addiction. I don't think actuaries are of much use in that realm.
Well if you can use risk factors to predict who is likely to become an addict, AND drugs like Vivitrol became far far cheaper, then those people could be given Vivitrol as a preventative measure. Seems overkill though, most likely.
__________________
Come join the AO Rap Battle Tournament 2013:
http://www.actuarialoutpost.com/actu...33#post7082433
Reply With Quote
  #65  
Old 09-18-2017, 03:00 AM
FormLetter's Avatar
FormLetter FormLetter is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 48,468
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Patriot View Post
When I had a kidney stone blasted I was given a 90 day (@ 6 pills per day) script for vicodin. Someone told me the street value for 540 vicodin tablets was several K.
Depending on the dosage, yes, that street value for that would be somewhere around $2500-$5000.

I think they waaaaaay over-prescribed in that case.
__________________
Come join the AO Rap Battle Tournament 2013:
http://www.actuarialoutpost.com/actu...33#post7082433
Reply With Quote
  #66  
Old 09-21-2017, 10:21 AM
Patriot Patriot is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 548
Default

Ask An Actuary!
Reply With Quote
  #67  
Old 09-22-2017, 03:15 PM
Random Walk's Avatar
Random Walk Random Walk is offline
Member
SOA AAA
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 291
Default

Well, some folks are starting to say insurance companies' policies on painkillers are making the opioid crisis worse:
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/17/h...companies.html

Quote:
ProPublica and The New York Times analyzed Medicare prescription drug plans covering 35.7 million people in the second quarter of this year. Only one-third of the people covered, for example, had any access to Butrans, a painkilling skin patch that contains a less-risky opioid, buprenorphine. And every drug plan that covered lidocaine patches, which are not addictive but cost more than other generic pain drugs, required that patients get prior approval for them.

In contrast, almost every plan covered common opioids and very few required any prior approval.

The insurers have also erected more hurdles to approving addiction treatments than for the addictive substances themselves, the analysis found.
__________________
Eh bien, continuons
Reply With Quote
  #68  
Old 10-15-2017, 06:05 AM
dgtatum's Avatar
dgtatum dgtatum is offline
Member
SOA
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Louisville, KY
Studying for MLC
Favorite beer: New Albanian Anything
Posts: 1,780
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by WhosOnFirst View Post
I think the OP was trying to show that the risk prediction methodologies that actuaries are very familiar with could help with opioid addiction. I inferred that that he believes that being able to predict who might get addicted in the first place could be of use to prevent future addiction. That would appear to be a realm where actuaries are better suite then clinicians.

I'm not positive I buy into the idea of being able to reduce addiction by predicting who might become an addict. My bias is towards viewing addiction as a medical condition which means my preference for solving any addiction would be through a better understanding of the biological processes that create addiction. I don't think actuaries are of much use in that realm.
There is a long history in the medical profession of using anecdotal evidence and stories to come up with treatment plans and actions. I think Actuaries absolutely have a role in helping people see through empirical data what works and what doesn't. Let the medical professionals come up with the treatment, let us show them the results.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:14 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
*PLEASE NOTE: Posts are not checked for accuracy, and do not
represent the views of the Actuarial Outpost or its sponsors.
Page generated in 0.37396 seconds with 9 queries