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  #441  
Old 06-05-2017, 05:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by campbell View Post
https://www.expressandstar.com/news/...nsion-protest/

Quote:
Campaign over women’s retirement age gathers pace in pension protest

The words of Christine Powell, who is one of thousands of women across the Black Country and Staffordshire who were born in the 1950s and say they have been left out of pocket by raises in the age at which they qualify for the state pension.

They argue they have been unjustly caught up in Government attempts to cut the mounting costs of paying for the state pension and equalise the pension age for men and women.

The problems stem from successive increases in the state pension age for women, which will be raised to 65 by 2018 and 66 two years later.

"The changes were brought in so quickly that we have been unexpectedly left unable to claim a pension and with no time to prepare for the future,” Mrs Powell said.

The issue has become one that politicians – particularly those of a Labour persuasion – have been keen to highlight during the current General Election campaign.
.....
For more than 60 years men received their pension at 65 and women at 60, but as women had a longer life expectancy than men campaigners argued that the difference was unfair.
.....
The plan was to raise the qualifying age for women to 65 and to phase in that change from 2010 to 2020.

But the coalition government of 2010 accelerated that timetable, arguing that the state pension was becoming increasingly unaffordable.

So in 2011 it was announced the new qualifying age of 65 for women was bought forward to 2018, while the qualifying age for men and women would be raised to 66 by October 2020.
.....
Lynn Tranah, founder of the WASPI group for Cannock, Stafford and Wolverhampton, has also been hit by the changes.

She says she was so enraged by the impact of the act on her retirement plans that at the age of 61 she dressed up as a suffragette and attended her first ever protest march at last year’s Conservative Party conference in Birmingham.

“I had the expectation that I could finish work and receive my state pension only to find that I have to wait another six years,” she said.

“There are a lack of jobs available for women who were born in the 1950s and don’t have work. What are we supposed to do?

“We are not against the equalisation of pensions. All we are asking for is fair transitional pension arrangements.

“Everyone has a mother, daughter, sister, aunt, niece or friend who is affected by this injustice and the impact of whether WASPI lose or win this campaign will have an effect on everyone else’s pension tomorrow.”

.....
In its manifesto Labour says women affected by the 2011 Act should get ‘some kind of compensation for their losses’.

The party has also pledged to extend Pension Credit to vulnerable women and says it is ‘exploring options for further transitional protections’.

UKIP has proposed a ‘flexible state pension window’ enabling people to opt for an earlier retirement for a lower pension, or work longer for a higher pension.

But Conservatives say the issue is far more complex than Labour are making out. "Labour are conveniently forgetting that they were in power for 13 years knowing the state pension age for women was increasing.

"It is hugely opportunistic on their part. They knew the state pension had to go up because people are living longer."


Read more at https://www.expressandstar.com/news/...rItrj1b7wUc.99
http://www.leicestermercury.co.uk/wo...ail/story.html

Quote:
The Labour candidate for Leicester West, Liz Kendall, has joined pension campaigners on a day of action in the city centre.

She took part in an event with campaigners from protest group Women Against State Pension Inequality (Waspi).

The campaign was to highlight the changes that Conservative-led governments have made recently to retirement ages and their proposals to alter the way pensions are calculated in the future.


Ms Kendall said: "Hundreds of thousands of women have had their retirement plans scuppered by changes to the state pension age brought in by the Conservative and Liberal Democrat Coalition Government.
"A huge campaign, including Parliament's biggest-ever petition, has called on the Government to undo the unfair and unjust changes in the 2011 Pension Act. Despite the brilliant work of the Women Against State Pension Inequality campaign, the Conservatives have refused to budge."

She urged voters to choose Labour for a fairer deal in their own retirement. She said: "The General Election on June 8 is a real opportunity to send the Tories a strong message to treat women affected by these changes with the fairness and respect they deserve.

Read more at http://www.leicestermercury.co.uk/wo...ADb2910VJtF.99
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  #442  
Old 06-05-2017, 05:21 PM
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NIGERIA

https://www.naij.com/1107659-dogara-...nt-age-65.html

Quote:
Dogara: N/Assembly will raise teachers’ retirement age to 65

- The retirement age of Nigerian teachers might soon be increased from 60 to 65 - This was disclosed by the speaker of the House of Representatives, Mr Yakubu Dogara - Dogara said there is a need to retain experienced teachers in public schools Read more: https://www.naij.com/1107659-dogara-...nt-age-65.html
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  #443  
Old 06-05-2017, 05:22 PM
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CHINA

https://www.ainonline.com/aviation-n...ent-age-pilots

Quote:
China To Raise Mandatory Retirement Age for Pilots

The Civil Aviation Administration of China (CAAC) plans to raise the mandatory retirement age for pilots from the current 60 as part of a strategy to ease the shortage faced by Chinese airlines. The agency has yet to arrive at a decision on the exact age, but it plans to implement the change in two or three years.

CAAC official Liu Shen told AIN that the shortage could get more acute as airlines acquire more aircraft and that hiring foreign pilots has become more difficult over the past five years as airlines around the world face a similar situation.

“Many airlines in the region have also raised the retirement age, salary and other benefits for their pilots to stay,” Liu noted.

Official estimates forecast a need for about 2,800 to 3,000 pilots annually over the next three years. The 12 flying schools across China can produce only between 1,250 and 1,300 a year.

Local airlines increasingly send their cadet pilots to the U.S., Europe or Australia for training due to the limited capacity at local schools. Cadets must undergo a minimum 80-hour English course before they start training. Some schools require six months of coursework.
.....
The Ministry of Transport of Japan raised its mandatory retirement age from 62 to 64 in 2004 and again to 67 in February 2015 to cope with a similar shortage following appeals from Japanese carriers.

Malaysia Airlines raised its retirement age from 55 to 60 in 2006; Singapore Airlines’ retirement age stands at 62, although it can extend the limit to 64 based on the health of the pilot and at the discretion of the management. AirAsia mandates retirement at 65.


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  #444  
Old 06-05-2017, 05:25 PM
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OXFORD UNIVERSITY
UNITED KINGDOM

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017...ment-age-rule/

Quote:
Oxford dons challenge retirement age rule

xford University academics are challenging rules that would force them to retire at the age of 67.

Public debates over the retirement age have been described as a battle between "old white men ... hanging on limpet-like to space and resource" and "talented young scholars" trying to get their first job, according to the Times Higher Education (THE) magazine.

It reported that academics have put forward a challenge to Oxford's "employer-justified retirement age" (EJRA), which was introduced by the university in 2011 after legislation was brought in scrapping the national default retirement age.

Under this law, employers could no longer force workers to retire at 65, but individual employers could still have an compulsory retirement age if they could justify the need for it.

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  #445  
Old 06-13-2017, 11:08 AM
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NIGERIA

http://tribuneonlineng.com/nass-plan...etirement-age/

Quote:
NASS’ plan to extend teachers’ retirement age


RECENTLY, an appeal was made by the national president of the Nigerian Union of Teachers (NUT), Michael Alogba Olukoya, when he led NUT officials to the Speaker of the House of Representatives, Mr. Yakubu Dogara.

The union leader said: “We teachers of Nigeria in primary and secondary schools do seek and demand that our retirement age be raised to 65 years to increase the teacher retention rate in our schools.”

However, the request made by the teachers’ union on extension of retirement age at this time is misplaced.

This is because there are more important issues that need urgent attention other than demanding a frivolous extension of retirement age for Nigerian teachers under the current uncertain economic situation and unfriendly working conditions.

https://guardian.ng/appointments/bor...ent-age-to-65/

Quote:
Borno raises health workers retirement age to 65

The Borno State Government has increased the retirement age of health workers to 65 years.This followed challenges of delivering healthcare services and other emergency response needs arising from the activities of Boko Haram insurgents that have claimed many lives and property in the state.

Governor Kashim Shettima disclosed this while declaring open the mid-term review meeting to assess the implementation of Health and Nutrition Emergency Response (HNER) project at the Government House, Maiduguri.

He said there was the need to better motivate health workers in the state to address the health needs of the people living in rural and urban areas.His words:“Before cynics ask any questions, let me quickly say that our work is in progress. We have rebuilt, expanded and remodeled nine out of 19
General Hospitals destroyed by Boko Haram.

“We are currently building nine new General Hospitals in various locations, while we have successfully built the first hospital dedicated to women and children in Borno State.”

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  #446  
Old 06-19-2017, 11:09 PM
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NEW ZEALAND

https://www.wsws.org/en/articles/201.../reti-j15.html

Quote:
New Zealand government to raise retirement age
By Tom Peters and Daniel Bradley
15 June 2017
The National Party government last month falsely portrayed its annual budget as a generous package to assist working families. Most media commentators focused on the small income tax cuts and increases to the Accommodation Supplement.
Any meagre concessions contained in the budget will be more than cancelled out by other cuts to basic services. One major cut, not mentioned in the commentary surrounding the budget, is the government’s decision, announced in March, to raise the superannuation entitlement (aged pension) age from 65 to 67.
The increase is estimated to cut $4 billion per year from public pension funding. The government claimed that the superannuation system would otherwise not be “affordable” in future because of longer life expectancy.
The change is scheduled to be phased in between 2037 and 2040, but could easily be brought forward as the underlying economic crisis deepens. Legislation for the change will be introduced in 2018, following this September’s national election.
The announcement represents a further escalation of the austerity measures implemented over the past decade. As in Europe, the US and Australia, the full burden is being imposed on the working class. The government has cut thousands of public sector jobs, increased the regressive Goods and Services Tax (GST), privatised companies, starved health and education sectors of funds and pushed thousands of vulnerable people off welfare.
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  #447  
Old 06-19-2017, 11:09 PM
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RUSSIA

http://tass.com/society/951521

Quote:
Putin says decision on retirement age should be made prudently, without haste

Society & Culture June 15, 15:12 UTC+3
The possibility of raising the retirement age is being actively discussed but no final decision has been made yet, Putin said


MOSCOW, June 15. /TASS/. The decision on retirement age should be made prudently and without haste, Russian President Vladimir Putin said in an annual televised question and answer session on Thursday.
"It is necessary to take such decisions prudently and without haste," he said, adding that though the possibility of raising the retirement age is being actively discussed no final decision has been made yet.
"Some experts say we cannot do without raising the retirement age, referring to the experience of other countries and neighboring states. However, no (final) decision has been made. It is really being discussed at the expert and governmental level. Experts say that without it the level of pension maintenance will be shrinking," Putin said.


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http://tass.com/society/951521
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  #448  
Old 06-19-2017, 11:13 PM
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IRELAND

MANDATORY RETIREMENT AGES

http://www.irishtimes.com/opinion/le...fair-1.3121208

Quote:
Is mandatory retirement age unfair?

Sir, – Mary Morrissey (June 13th) argues that mandatory retirement should be protected because forcing people out of work when they turn 65 creates jobs for younger workers.
This is not the case. Research from the IMF, the OECD and the World of Labour Research Institute have all confirmed that reducing labour force participation among older people does not lead to increased employment for young people.
In fact, the reverse seems to be true. Iceland, New Zealand, Sweden and Norway are among the top 10 countries in the world for youth employment and simultaneously for the employment of older people. Research from Denmark and France has also shown that reduced labour force participation for older workers saw drops in youth employment.
Put simply, the more older workers in employment, the better for growing our economy and creating jobs for everyone.
More than 40 years ago Irish people rejected the idea that women should leave the workforce because they got married to make room for men. The same thinking today is driving older workers onto the dole, undermining their sense of self-worth and costing our economy thousands of skilled, experienced employees every year.
It’s time to abolish mandatory retirement, and we would urge the new Taoiseach and his Cabinet to support legislation currently going through the Oireachtas that is designed to do just that. – Yours, etc,
JUSTIN MORAN,
Head of Advocacy
and Communications,
Age Action Ireland,
Camden Street,
Dublin 2.
http://www.irishtimes.com/opinion/le...pose-1.3117077

Quote:
Compulsory retirement age serves a purpose

Sir, – Alice Leahy (June 12th) states that “in some cases the rush to get rid of people with experience is breath-taking”.
I respectfully take the opposite view. I am worried about the momentum developing in society to abandon the concept of compulsory retirement from the public service at 65 years of age. I believe that compulsory retirement evolved for rational reasons, and if it is determined to be ageist at 65 years, then it must be considered equally ageist at any other age. This raises the rather scary prospect of having 80-year-old hospital doctors and nurses, High Court judges in their nineties, or school bus drivers approaching their century. It seems inevitable that productivity would fall, sick leave would increase and the quality of the service would suffer. How many patients would be adversely affected by a hospital consultant if he was finally diagnosed with age-related dementia at 95 years of age? And would it be considered ageist to performance-monitor him more closely than a 40-year-old consultant? The monitoring of elderly employees, their regular health checks, and the litigation involved in ridding the service of underperforming staff would become an expensive industry in itself.
Furthermore, I am convinced that the push for an extension to the retirement age, or an abandonment of any compulsory retirement altogether, is not emanating from 30-year-olds or 80-year-olds. It comes largely from people in their late fifties or early sixties whose compulsory retirement is imminent, and who are not ready for the blow to their income, status or ego that retirement will bring. These people fail to see that they have had their opportunity to contribute to the public service and that it is now someone else’s turn to do so. The number of jobs is finite, demand for employment in the public service is high, and if we want to stop emigration and give young people a chance, then the older people must retire. All of this is in accordance with the natural circle of life.

Employees’ genuine fears of retirement should be addressed by more intense retirement planning and preparation courses to prepare them mentally for their new role in society.
In addition, a new national agency should be created to interact with every retiree, encouraging and coordinating meaningful activities such as mentoring of younger people, work on advisory committees, hospital voluntary work, tourism guides and an endless array of other voluntary community work, especially community work for the elderly themselves. – Yours, etc,
MARY MORRISSEY,
Castletownbere,
Co Cork.

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  #449  
Old 06-19-2017, 11:15 PM
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http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-oxfordshire-40253048

Quote:
Oxford University dons lose new vote over retirement age

Academics at Oxford University have failed in a new bid to challenge rules forcing them to retire at 67.
The university's congregation - which is made up of academics and administrative staff - voted down a call to axe the retirement age.
Paul Ewart, a 69-year-old professor of physics at Oxford, said it was "disappointing... but not the end".
Oxford University said its rule created "career progression" and "inter-generational" fairness.
Prof Ewart has described the rule as "age discrimination" and said it affected many colleagues still teaching at "the peak of their form".
He said he and his colleagues respected the vote but individuals could still take their cases to employment tribunals.
Gill Evans, emeritus professor at Cambridge University, who has been involved in the Oxford campaign, said: "Nobody is surprised, everybody involved sees this as a stage in the process."
The Equality Act prevents employers from forcing workers to retire at 65, although employers can still implement a compulsory retirement age where they can justify it.
A motion to scrap the university's rule was debated by Oxford's congregation on 16 May, but was lost by 143 votes to 64.
Campaigners then triggered the postal vote of all members the congregation - around 5,000 in total - over the future of the EJRA.
The ballot closed on Friday but was defeated by 1,142 votes to 538.
Oxford University said the postal vote was the sixth time in three months that the congregation had considered the "employer-justified retirement age" and that it had supported the policy every time.
"By any standard, the frequency of discussion and voting has been exhaustive and the considerable majority against abolition speaks for itself," it added.
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