Actuarial Outpost
 
Go Back   Actuarial Outpost > Actuarial Discussion Forum > Careers - Employment
FlashChat Actuarial Discussion Preliminary Exams CAS/SOA Exams Cyberchat Around the World Suggestions


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #41  
Old 04-15-2019, 07:48 PM
Dr T Non-Fan Dr T Non-Fan is offline
Member
SOA AAA
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Just outside of Nowhere
Posts: 96,729
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by hrm57 View Post
I shadowed a few local actuaries last week and was surprised at how bad some of the colleges they attended were. Two of the four went to private colleges with SAT scores in the 1000-1100 range. To me this was very odd especially given how competitive EL is said to be on forums.
The few that you shadowed were all students in the average SAT range of the school? Did you ask them or something? Are you assuming the average means (hah!) that the SAT scores of everyone at the school is at the average?
If so, you are probably not qualified to work in this field.
__________________
"Facebook is a toilet." -- LWTwJO

"45 es un titere" -- Seal of The President of The United States of America protest art
Reply With Quote
  #42  
Old 04-15-2019, 08:01 PM
hrm57 hrm57 is online now
Member
Non-Actuary
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Posts: 44
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr T Non-Fan View Post
The few that you shadowed were all students in the average SAT range of the school? Did you ask them or something? Are you assuming the average means (hah!) that the SAT scores of everyone at the school is at the average?
If so, you are probably not qualified to work in this field.
I was saying that I was surprised they did not attend better colleges, and used the SAT ranges for those schools as a measuring stick.
Reply With Quote
  #43  
Old 04-15-2019, 08:05 PM
Helena Lake's Avatar
Helena Lake Helena Lake is offline
Member
SOA AAA
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Studying for Nothing ever again!
Favorite beer: Whisky
Posts: 6,152
Default

I've never really felt that the college had much weight for an undergrad degree. I mean, a university with an Actuarial Science program might have more benefit in this field... but outside from just "they have a degree that is literally this", the name of the college has never mattered to me. Maybe if it's an Ivy League school, but generally, grades and a degree were all that seemed important.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by BernieSanders2016 View Post
I don't think calling beliefs absurd and bullshit is criticism, it's insulting.
Reply With Quote
  #44  
Old 04-15-2019, 08:08 PM
Dr T Non-Fan Dr T Non-Fan is offline
Member
SOA AAA
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Just outside of Nowhere
Posts: 96,729
Default

You are surprised. You should try to understand why you are surprised. Then, eventually, you'll understand that it's not a big deal, in the Actuarial Profession, which college one goes to. Passing exams, acting like a human for a minimum of a few hours during an interview and coming out on top of that process. That is what gets people jobs. Doing competent work keeps the job. Going above the expectation gets one promotions.
Some people don't get the luxury of choosing their college. And, some hiring managers don't really care.

And, sometimes people with stuck up attitudes about things, like which college people went to, aren't that comfortable to be around for an eight-hour day. That is included in the interview process.
__________________
"Facebook is a toilet." -- LWTwJO

"45 es un titere" -- Seal of The President of The United States of America protest art
Reply With Quote
  #45  
Old 04-15-2019, 08:13 PM
Helena Lake's Avatar
Helena Lake Helena Lake is offline
Member
SOA AAA
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Studying for Nothing ever again!
Favorite beer: Whisky
Posts: 6,152
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr T Non-Fan View Post
You are surprised. You should try to understand why you are surprised. Then, eventually, you'll understand that it's not a big deal, in the Actuarial Profession, which college one goes to. Passing exams, acting like a human for a minimum of a few hours during an interview and coming out on top of that process. That is what gets people jobs. Doing competent work keeps the job. Going above the expectation gets one promotions.
Some people don't get the luxury of choosing their college. And, some hiring managers don't really care.

And, sometimes people with stuck up attitudes about things, like which college people went to, aren't that comfortable to be around for an eight-hour day. That is included in the interview process.
You are my favorite poster of the day.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by BernieSanders2016 View Post
I don't think calling beliefs absurd and bullshit is criticism, it's insulting.
Reply With Quote
  #46  
Old 04-15-2019, 09:07 PM
hrm57 hrm57 is online now
Member
Non-Actuary
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Posts: 44
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by vjvj View Post
Yeah, it's something (especially if you're not a "qualified" candidate without it), but I was thinking more like

1) Write your resume in the way that sells you best
2) Develop your interviewing skills to best sell you
3) Maybe networking?

I think in a way this gets back to what DTNF said. You need to make the hiring manager think you're the best candidate.
What do you think is the best way to develop interview skills?
Reply With Quote
  #47  
Old 04-15-2019, 09:11 PM
NormalDan's Avatar
NormalDan NormalDan is offline
Member
CAS
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: NJ
Posts: 8,428
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr T Non-Fan View Post
You are surprised. You should try to understand why you are surprised. Then, eventually, you'll understand that it's not a big deal, in the Actuarial Profession, which college one goes to. Passing exams, acting like a human for a minimum of a few hours during an interview and coming out on top of that process. That is what gets people jobs. Doing competent work keeps the job. Going above the expectation gets one promotions.
Some people don't get the luxury of choosing their college. And, some hiring managers don't really care.

And, sometimes people with stuck up attitudes about things, like which college people went to, aren't that comfortable to be around for an eight-hour day. That is included in the interview process.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Helena Lake View Post
You are my favorite poster of the day.

Quote:
Originally Posted by hrm57 View Post
What do you think is the best way to develop interview skills?
Practice helps most. If you don't have enough real opportunities get your friends/family to interview you. And otherwise just get yourself more confident talking about who you are/what you do. I'd bet speed dating could be helpful.
Reply With Quote
  #48  
Old 04-16-2019, 12:28 AM
vjvj's Avatar
vjvj vjvj is offline
Note Contributor
Non-Actuary
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: IL
Studying for MFE
Posts: 7,684
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by hrm57 View Post
What do you think is the best way to develop interview skills?
As NormalDan said, practice.

Some things...

I haven't been looking for a bit, but by me there were quite a few good resources. All of these provided practice interviews - recorded in most cases, which is particularly good, as you can see where you were good and where you need work: college placement office, local job clubs, unemployment office, LDS employment resource center. Or you can use friends and relatives or just practice on your own from a list of questions.

There are a bunch of lists of typical interview questions that will come up with a search. Practice answering each of them. Out loud. The second time through each question is usually *way* better than the first.

I'd put some thought, in particular, on stories that would work well with behavioral questions (tell me about a time when ....).

If you have something special you know you want to get across in interviews, make a point of working on bringing up the topic.

If you don't wear "interview clothes" typically, wear some from time to time to get comfortable in them. Do some practice interviews in them.
__________________
.
PLEASE SUPPORT CHILDREN'S CANCER RESEARCH

TO DONATE, OR FOR MORE INFO, CLICK HERE
Reply With Quote
  #49  
Old 04-16-2019, 01:59 PM
avocado avocado is online now
Member
SOA
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Posts: 81
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Helena Lake View Post
I've never really felt that the college had much weight for an undergrad degree. I mean, a university with an Actuarial Science program might have more benefit in this field... but outside from just "they have a degree that is literally this", the name of the college has never mattered to me. Maybe if it's an Ivy League school, but generally, grades and a degree were all that seemed important.
I'm not the OP, but I just want to chime in to ask. Am I at a disadvantage if my degrees are not from the US (compared to those with degrees from the US)? I got my undergrad degree in a non-English speaking country and my master's degree from the UK (a good school but probably not among those that people in the US would know). Both are not actuarial science degree.
Reply With Quote
  #50  
Old 04-16-2019, 02:09 PM
Helena Lake's Avatar
Helena Lake Helena Lake is offline
Member
SOA AAA
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Studying for Nothing ever again!
Favorite beer: Whisky
Posts: 6,152
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by avocado View Post
I'm not the OP, but I just want to chime in to ask. Am I at a disadvantage if my degrees are not from the US (compared to those with degrees from the US)? I got my undergrad degree in a non-English speaking country and my master's degree from the UK (a good school but probably not among those that people in the US would know). Both are not actuarial science degree.
You're likely at a disadvantage, but not for the reason you seem to be implying. You're at a disadvantage because there are a LOT of actuaries in the US who are already citizens, and there's a lot of competition. Your problem would likely be getting hired in the first place. You'd want a company willing to sponsor you for citizenship (I assume), and it will be incredibly difficult to get through the job posting phase to prove that there are no sufficiently qualified citizen candidates for the position. You might not even find an employer willing to provide legal support for a work visa.

One strategy, if this is your goal, would be to focus on smaller areas, in less populous states. Especially if there aren't any feeder schools in the vicinity. That way, there are less likely to be many applicants to compete against. Then you might have some possibility of making it through the posting phase, but there's still no guarantee.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by BernieSanders2016 View Post
I don't think calling beliefs absurd and bullshit is criticism, it's insulting.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:00 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
*PLEASE NOTE: Posts are not checked for accuracy, and do not
represent the views of the Actuarial Outpost or its sponsors.
Page generated in 0.23830 seconds with 9 queries