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  #21  
Old 05-01-2019, 12:14 AM
exponentc exponentc is offline
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Originally Posted by snale86 View Post
What I don't like is the constant repetition, performing the same tasks again and again, using the same models, developing the same filings. I like developing new models. I enjoy drafting new reports and presentations, not populating an old template. Are there actuarial jobs like this? How can I find them? I unfortunately do not have broad exposure... I also do not want a high level management job- I like to stay close to the technical aspect of the work.

I had assumed that as a computer programmer I could find a job where I'd regularly be writing new code for new software. Am I wrong?
Possibly a DS job will interest you. It involves both programming and building statistical models. You may need to get a master degree to make yourself stand out in the job market tho.
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  #22  
Old 05-01-2019, 06:39 AM
snale86 snale86 is offline
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I can't go back to school now
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  #23  
Old 05-01-2019, 11:33 AM
Westley Westley is offline
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If you mean " I can't quit my job and go to school full time" - that may not be necessary. Totally normal to do a masters part-time, sometimes with financial support from your current job.

Or whatever you mean by "can't", would suggest there might be more options to consider than what you've already considered.
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  #24  
Old 05-01-2019, 11:40 AM
OnLevel OnLevel is offline
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OP, you're a fellow with 10 years of experience, you're a mid-level manager (in consulting!) and you don't know what else is out there in your industry? I have trouble believing that. Do you not attend SoA meetings or read industry publications/linkedin/Google/the internet to keep up with your industry? The fact that you hate your job and don't know how to get out of if makes me think you have other issues.
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  #25  
Old 05-01-2019, 11:50 AM
Westley Westley is offline
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The fact that you hate your job and don't know how to get out of if makes me think you have other issues.
Easily possible, although all the other comments ALSO fit with somebody working as one of the two health actuaries at a small niche company in Spokane, or Albuquerque, or Chattanooga. Which is sorta what I was assuming.

Def agree that OP sounds relatively clueless about the broader industry relative to people with ten years' experience.
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  #26  
Old 05-01-2019, 02:35 PM
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Helena Lake Helena Lake is offline
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Helena- that sounds like it may be a good fit for me. I think I do have the soft skills. What are the technical skills needed? Which programs did you use for building these models?
Lol, the vast majority were in Excel, with the back-end data work done in SQL. Excel was the most flexible platform for it, allowing sufficient complexity, as well as full transparency for review. The pricing models needed to be accessible and understandable by all of the actuaries as well as all of underwriting. The formulary model was used by actuaries and pharmacists. The GF and MH Parity models got used by sales people. They all needed to be fairly transparent, so other people could follow what the model was doing - especially since there were parts of all of the models that required actuarial judgment and overrides to base model assumptions.

Also, a bit of SAS and a lot of Tableau more recently.

The technical skill wasn't my selling point though, it was my creativity - the ability to start with a blank slate, and come up with a way to solve a problem that hasn't yet been solved. Figure out ways to apply prior learning to new endeavors, extrapolate, extend, and innovate. Adapt methods to new purposes. Dig in and understand subject matter very deeply, then be able to use that understanding to do new things.

Let me toss out a case for you to noodle over. A large group asks to add coverage for transgender reassignment surgery. Your company has never covered that before, so you don't have any historical claims to draw on. How do you figure out what the price impact is? What additional assumptions do you consider in pricing?
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  #27  
Old 05-01-2019, 06:15 PM
snale86 snale86 is offline
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Originally Posted by OnLevel View Post
OP, you're a fellow with 10 years of experience, you're a mid-level manager (in consulting!) and you don't know what else is out there in your industry? I have trouble believing that. Do you not attend SoA meetings or read industry publications/linkedin/Google/the internet to keep up with your industry? The fact that you hate your job and don't know how to get out of if makes me think you have other issues.
I hear why it appears that way but no, there are no issues other than what I've already mentioned (lack of exposure, mentorship, and interest). I am good at what I do and well liked by my team. Yes, I do work with only a few other actuaries doing atypical work.
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  #28  
Old 05-01-2019, 06:29 PM
snale86 snale86 is offline
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Originally Posted by Helena Lake View Post
Lol, the vast majority were in Excel, with the back-end data work done in SQL. Excel was the most flexible platform for it, allowing sufficient complexity, as well as full transparency for review. The pricing models needed to be accessible and understandable by all of the actuaries as well as all of underwriting. The formulary model was used by actuaries and pharmacists. The GF and MH Parity models got used by sales people. They all needed to be fairly transparent, so other people could follow what the model was doing - especially since there were parts of all of the models that required actuarial judgment and overrides to base model assumptions.

Also, a bit of SAS and a lot of Tableau more recently.

The technical skill wasn't my selling point though, it was my creativity - the ability to start with a blank slate, and come up with a way to solve a problem that hasn't yet been solved. Figure out ways to apply prior learning to new endeavors, extrapolate, extend, and innovate. Adapt methods to new purposes. Dig in and understand subject matter very deeply, then be able to use that understanding to do new things.

Let me toss out a case for you to noodle over. A large group asks to add coverage for transgender reassignment surgery. Your company has never covered that before, so you don't have any historical claims to draw on. How do you figure out what the price impact is? What additional assumptions do you consider in pricing?
This is really helpful!

About the surgery, you'd need to understand surgery complexity, hospital length of stay, and what follow up entails. I'd honestly start with a google search and discussions with clinicians, if possible. Absent any other data, I'd look at a description of the surgery and try to find similar procedures- some of the procedures newly covered are also performed for other purposes. So tell me, how would you go about it?
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  #29  
Old 05-01-2019, 06:41 PM
selectstar selectstar is offline
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This is really helpful!

About the surgery, you'd need to understand surgery complexity, hospital length of stay, and what follow up entails. I'd honestly start with a google search and discussions with clinicians, if possible. Absent any other data, I'd look at a description of the surgery and try to find similar procedures- some of the procedures newly covered are also performed for other purposes. So tell me, how would you go about it?
geographic area, % of pop that is transgender, % of transgender pop that gets surgery, how well the group matches general transgender pop, cost trends, contract changes, what docs can even do this surgery, comorbidities, codes lists and surgery options. You also need to estimate the cost savings of not having to treat patients who come home from Mexico with sepsis after a botched operation.

These projects are fun when the budget is right
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  #30  
Old 05-01-2019, 07:05 PM
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Originally Posted by snale86 View Post
This is really helpful!

About the surgery, you'd need to understand surgery complexity, hospital length of stay, and what follow up entails. I'd honestly start with a google search and discussions with clinicians, if possible. Absent any other data, I'd look at a description of the surgery and try to find similar procedures- some of the procedures newly covered are also performed for other purposes. So tell me, how would you go about it?
Essentially the same way. I did research into what is included in the surgeries, as well as the percentages of transgender people who undergo all facets of them. I also did research on the average cost of those surgeries, and how they differed for male versus female transitions.... and the prevalence of transgender within the population. Put together a basic estimate for the "average" cost over a three year span for a population with an "average" distribution of transgender people who have an "average" approach to the extent of transition.

I also adjusted for the age distribution of the group in question, which had a larger proportion of younger people than the general population, and research suggested that transgender treatment is more frequent in a somewhat younger population.

Then I tripled my estimate for adverse selection - I figure they weren't asking for giggles, and that they were guaranteed to have at least one person (probably higher up in the company) who would use the benefit, so the likelihood needed to be ramped up
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