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  #1  
Old 05-04-2019, 08:39 AM
IacceptTheTerms IacceptTheTerms is offline
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Default What are hiring managers looking for during interviews?

I have an interview coming up for hopefully my first actuarial job. I have failed several interviews in the past and came close to sealing the deal to one company but it always ended up either the company ghosting me or receiving a rejection email. So I am here to ask for help for those who are passing candidates in interview. What are you looking for in a candidate? What determines an immediate yes/no for a hiring manager? Are there any red flags you are looking for? Thanks in advance for the help.
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Old 05-04-2019, 10:32 AM
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It depends on the hiring manager. It's a lot like dating, everyone is different and looking for their own type of person. Think of it more as a compatibility search than a rigorous test with well-defined criteria.

I look for people who have initiative, are intelligent, and independent, curious thinkers who don't need much hand-holding.

Grades are important, school carries some weight but isn't everything. I have moved candidates along who had poor grades and didn't go to the best schools because they did very well when asked about their tech skills/curiosity.

Other interviewers are different.
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Old 05-04-2019, 12:09 PM
Chopin-Lover Chopin-Lover is offline
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See if you really know about the things you listed on your resume.

Determine if you're a person that he/she would like to work with.

For entry level, like CS said, see if you're intelligent and can learn things with little guidance.
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Old 05-04-2019, 12:15 PM
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Originally Posted by Chopin-Lover View Post
See if you really know about the things you listed on your resume.

Determine if you're a person that he/she would like to work with.

For entry level, like CS said, see if you're intelligent and can learn things with little guidance.
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Old 05-04-2019, 12:56 PM
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Pretty good summary above. In particular, "do I want to work with this person" is important.

I've always said my criteria are:
1) Can you do the job?
2) Do you want the job?
3) Are you coachable.


1) Is pretty much yes for EL if you have a math-y background and have passed a few exams. If the role requires strength in a particular programming skill or whatever, then that would be something to evaluate.
2) If it's consulting, are you ok with the hours. Are you ok with the career path. Will you be invested, interested, etc.
3) Too many ELs are coming from college and one of the smartest in their program, and convinced that they have nothing to learn, which makes it difficult when you try to train/mentor/develop.
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Old 05-04-2019, 03:19 PM
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Red Flags for me:
- Blame others (team members, professors, ...) There's always never good outcome if you come across as immature/whiny and pointing fingers at others about why a class/team project didn't work out... Even if you truly believe you have done everything right, talk about what you did and what you learned from the experience.

- Not doing the research about the company/position - not having questions to fill the time --> shows lack of intellectual curiosity and preparation and interest

- Embellish their resume - if you put it on your resume and couldn't speak to it intelligently, it comes across as you don't know what you were doing (be very careful with what you list on your internship experience - if you say you interned in Reserving but you cannot talk about reserving techniques, it's not going to end up well. Technical skills, saying you're proficient in Excel but have no idea about some common functions doesn't look good)
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Old 05-06-2019, 11:14 PM
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Red Flags for me:
- Blame others
So if a candidate has been screwed over by someone else, you'd rather them make up a story than give the real reason why something didn't work out?
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Old 05-07-2019, 12:06 AM
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So if a candidate has been screwed over by someone else, you'd rather them make up a story than give the real reason why something didn't work out?
No. Present the story properly, suggesting what you learned from the situation and how you would have handled it differently today.
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Old 05-07-2019, 04:57 AM
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No. Present the story properly, suggesting what you learned from the situation and how you would have handled it differently today.


This may backfire on you, but at least you increase the probability of the hiring manager(s) looking at your situation in a more positive light.
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Old 05-07-2019, 09:05 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hello, My Baby View Post
So if a candidate has been screwed over by someone else, you'd rather them make up a story than give the real reason why something didn't work out?
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Originally Posted by DoctorNo View Post
No. Present the story properly, suggesting what you learned from the situation and how you would have handled it differently today.
This. So hard, this.
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