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  #1  
Old 06-06-2014, 07:32 PM
ReturningCollegeStudent ReturningCollegeStudent is offline
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Default What is a good beginner Java book?

I'm shopping on Amazon, and I've found tons of books that promise to explain how to write Java, but none of them claims to have homework problems. They show a detailed table of contents, and a description, but no mention of any practice problems. I can't learn something if I don't have a way of practicing.

Do you know of any good beginner Java books that will tell me where to get the software, how to write and debug it, and also have plenty of practice problems?

Thank you.
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Old 06-06-2014, 07:58 PM
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http://www.amazon.com/The-Art-Craft-...ds=coffee+book

This is my favorite java book and it gives detailed exercises for at home
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Old 06-06-2014, 08:57 PM
ReturningCollegeStudent ReturningCollegeStudent is offline
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Good news. I don't have to pay for a book or wait for it to arrive. I found this site:

http://www.learnjavaonline.org/

It has 8 basic lessons, and lets me type into one box, click Run, and see the output in the other box. Looks like cake. I'll report back on how much progress I make.



...
I'm having to keep track of several new terms, though I'm sure it will come together. A lot of the words look like those used in C. I think the C lines were shorter, though.

They keep defining new terms with new terms, but the language is starting to make sense. I have to read over it a few times to extract more out.

Last edited by ReturningCollegeStudent; 06-06-2014 at 09:13 PM..
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Old 06-06-2014, 10:49 PM
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I don't know if they are any good, but Oracle has tutorials on their site:
http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/
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Old 06-06-2014, 10:58 PM
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O'Reilly?
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Old 06-07-2014, 11:06 PM
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When searching for a technical book, I too attempt to find those that have exercises and projects to complete and unfortunately there are way too many highly rated books on amazon that have absolutely no practice problems. I've never once had a book issued from a professor that was not replete with problems at the end of the chapter.

I can fly through material in text books that make perfect sense at the time, but if I'm not actually building a project I won't remember any of it a couple weeks later.

OP, there is the great algorithms class on coursera offered from Princeton that is taught entirely in Java. All you need is perhaps 20 hours of basic Java tutorials/coding and you will be ready for it. There are weekly assignments that are challenging with extremely good feedback - actually, unbelievably good for an autograder. You will learn a ton if you complete all the assignments.
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Old 06-08-2014, 01:54 PM
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Thank you! That is the type of thing I want. Even if my fall class has problems, doing more is needed for practice.
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Old 06-08-2014, 05:09 PM
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Thinking In Java by Bruce Eckel.

The latest is the 4th edition, but the 3rd edition is free online: http://www.mindview.net/Books/TIJ/
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