Actuarial Outpost
 
Go Back   Actuarial Outpost > Actuarial Discussion Forum > Life
FlashChat Actuarial Discussion Preliminary Exams CAS/SOA Exams Cyberchat Around the World Suggestions


Upload your resume securely at https://www.dwsimpson.com
to be contacted when our jobs meet your skills and objectives.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 07-09-2009, 03:25 PM
campbell's Avatar
campbell campbell is offline
Mary Pat Campbell
SOA AAA
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: NY
Studying for duolingo and coursera
Favorite beer: Murphy's Irish Stout
Posts: 84,168
Blog Entries: 6
Default Longevity watch

Thread specifically for research regarding longevity/aging [and in particular, increasing longevity]

Today's installment comes from the WSJ:
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB124709861851715333.html

Quote:
A study published Wednesday found that rapamycin, a drug used in organ transplants, increased the life span of mice by 9% to 14%, the first definitive case in which a chemical has been shown to extend the life span of normal mammals.

Anti-aging researchers also expect a second study, to be released this week, will show that sharply cutting the calorie intake of monkeys extends their lives substantially. The experiment is said to be the first technique shown to retard aging in primates.
__________________
It's STUMP

LinkedIn Profile
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 07-09-2009, 11:38 PM
ActuarialFun ActuarialFun is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Midwest
Posts: 369
Default

Interesting, thanks!
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 07-10-2009, 07:14 AM
campbell's Avatar
campbell campbell is offline
Mary Pat Campbell
SOA AAA
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: NY
Studying for duolingo and coursera
Favorite beer: Murphy's Irish Stout
Posts: 84,168
Blog Entries: 6
Default

A little bit more about the drug mentioned in the above article:
http://www.popsci.com/scitech/articl...-easter-island

Quote:
Rapamycin, a compound originally found in Easter Island's soil in the 1970s (right there under the stone heads) has recently been proven to extend the lives of mice.

When tested on mice that had already reached middle age, the subjects treated with rapamycin increased their lifespan by 28-38 percent. Scientists are identifying these studies as the most promising drug-induced technique for increasing longevity, which is generally possible only via genetic manipulation or limiting caloric intake.

....

Since the pathway the drug responds to has been shown to increase lifespans in yeast, fruit flies, and mice, it could be assumed that the same pathway has been carried on evolutionarily to humans. Unfortunately, since the drug seems to also suppress parts of the immune system, it might be best to be used as a preventative for age-related disease rather than a cocktail to live forever. But the possibilities make you wonder that if only the original inhabitants of Easter Island knew the treasure under their feet, they might still be around to explain those statues to us.
__________________
It's STUMP

LinkedIn Profile
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 07-10-2009, 10:03 AM
JMO Fan's Avatar
JMO Fan JMO Fan is offline
Member
SOA AAA
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: out in the woods
Favorite beer: Frostop Root
Posts: 5,025
Thumbs up Longevity Watch = risk timepiece

I'd rather have a longevity watch than longevity insurance. Just saying.

[Longevity watch = timepiece that rings a little bell whenever I encounter a risk that is likely to shorten my life, e.g., oncoming train, tempting dessert, or late-night TV.]
__________________
I thought this WAS a real job
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 07-10-2009, 10:38 AM
biglion8's Avatar
biglion8 biglion8 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 214
Default

Instead of taking another drug, we could try this:
Quote:
Caloric restriction (CR), without malnutrition, delays aging and extends life span in diverse species; however, its effect on resistance to illness and mortality in primates has not been clearly established. We report findings of a 20-year longitudinal adult-onset CR study in rhesus monkeys aimed at filling this critical gap in aging research. In a population of rhesus macaques maintained at the Wisconsin National Primate Research Center, moderate CR lowered the incidence of aging-related deaths. At the time point reported, 50% of control fed animals survived as compared with 80% of the CR animals. Furthermore, CR delayed the onset of age-associated pathologies. Specifically, CR reduced the incidence of diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular disease, and brain atrophy. These data demonstrate that CR slows aging in a primate species.
http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/conten...t/325/5937/201
__________________
The modern conservative is engaged in one of man's oldest exercises in moral philosophy; that is, the search for a superior moral justification for selfishness.
John Kenneth Galbraith
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 07-10-2009, 10:45 AM
JMO's Avatar
JMO JMO is offline
Carol Marler
Non-Actuary
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Back home again in Indiana
Studying for Nothing actuarial.
Posts: 37,428
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JMO Fan View Post
I'd rather have a longevity watch than longevity insurance. Just saying.

[Longevity watch = timepiece that rings a little bell whenever I encounter a risk that is likely to shorten my life, e.g., oncoming train, tempting dessert, or late-night TV.]
You should turn this into a story for the biennial Speculative Fiction contest. Or if you could put it in a risk management context, a short short for the Contingencies fiction contest.
__________________
Carol Marler, "Just My Opinion"

Pluto is no longer a planet and I am no longer an actuary. Please take my opinions as non-actuarial.


My latest favorite quotes, updated Apr 5, 2018.

Spoiler:
I should keep these four permanently.
Quote:
Originally Posted by rekrap View Post
JMO is right
Quote:
Originally Posted by campbell View Post
I agree with JMO.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Westley View Post
And def agree w/ JMO.
Quote:
Originally Posted by MG View Post
This. And everything else JMO wrote.
And this all purpose permanent quote:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr T Non-Fan View Post
Yup, it is always someone else's fault.
MORE:
All purpose response for careers forum:
Quote:
Originally Posted by DoctorNo View Post
Depends upon the employer and the situation.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sredni Vashtar View Post
I feel like ERM is 90% buzzwords, and that the underlying agenda is to make sure at least one of your Corporate Officers is not dumb.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 07-10-2009, 11:02 AM
campbell's Avatar
campbell campbell is offline
Mary Pat Campbell
SOA AAA
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: NY
Studying for duolingo and coursera
Favorite beer: Murphy's Irish Stout
Posts: 84,168
Blog Entries: 6
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JMO View Post
You should turn this into a story for the biennial Speculative Fiction contest. Or if you could put it in a risk management context, a short short for the Contingencies fiction contest.
I was thinking the same thing....
__________________
It's STUMP

LinkedIn Profile
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 07-10-2009, 01:47 PM
Run2standstill Run2standstill is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 67
Default Longevity watch vs. longevity swap

Compell, how do you link this news with the growing longevity trading activities? Just a little over a month ago, the first large (over 1 bn GBP) longevity deal went live in UK, and there are a few large ones are on the table.

On the life settlement side, the early 90's breakthrough on AIDS treatment brought down quite a few market players. So for aging drug, though as the WSJ article saids, a human drug is still in far distance, the longevity business is very long tailed as well.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 07-10-2009, 01:52 PM
campbell's Avatar
campbell campbell is offline
Mary Pat Campbell
SOA AAA
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: NY
Studying for duolingo and coursera
Favorite beer: Murphy's Irish Stout
Posts: 84,168
Blog Entries: 6
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Run2standstill View Post
Compell, how do you link this news with the growing longevity trading activities? Just a little over a month ago, the first large (over 1 bn GBP) longevity deal went live in UK, and there are a few large ones are on the table.

On the life settlement side, the early 90's breakthrough on AIDS treatment brought down quite a few market players. So for aging drug, though as the WSJ article saids, a human drug is still in far distance, the longevity business is very long tailed as well.
I think this would be a good place for such stuff as well.

I remember reading about the longevity swaps in the UK sometime recently, and thought I may have posted that somewhere, but I'm not seeing it. I thought I had created a thread like this before, and wasn't finding any such thing either.
__________________
It's STUMP

LinkedIn Profile
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 07-10-2009, 01:59 PM
Dr T Non-Fan Dr T Non-Fan is offline
Member
SOA AAA
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Just outside of Nowhere
Posts: 92,691
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by campbell View Post
Thread specifically for research regarding longevity/aging [and in particular, increasing longevity]

Today's installment comes from the WSJ:
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB124709861851715333.html
As long as the health care costs are also lower, I (a health actuary) am interested. My cynical side thinks otherwise.
__________________
"Facebook is a toilet." -- LWTwJO
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
aging, longevity, mortality, research

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:59 AM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
*PLEASE NOTE: Posts are not checked for accuracy, and do not
represent the views of the Actuarial Outpost or its sponsors.
Page generated in 0.45097 seconds with 9 queries