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  #141  
Old 01-04-2016, 12:51 PM
Steve Grondin Steve Grondin is offline
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Interesting. Wonder if the data from Southern Hemisphere nations shows the same weather pattern and how holiday data affects a summer low.
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  #142  
Old 01-08-2016, 06:06 PM
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Not really news. Just a visualization.

http://flowingdata.com/2016/01/05/causes-of-death/
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  #143  
Old 01-12-2016, 06:27 PM
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http://www.genre.com/knowledge/blog/..._campaign=blog

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Does an Economic Downturn Lead to an Increasing Mortality Rate?

A direct link between the average mortality rate and personal wealth and socio-economic class should come as no surprise. Wealthier people in any population have access to the best healthcare, nutrition, education and living conditions, and so will live longer.

A longitudinal study of workers in England and Wales showed that people in what were classified as routine and semi-routine jobs in 2006 could expect an average life expectancy of 75 years, compared to just 70 years in 1986. Meanwhile, the life expectancy of people in managerial and professional jobs rose from 75 years to around 80 years.1

This gap of five years between the highest and lowest occupation groups has remained relatively stable over the 20-year study period. A similar picture emerges from the U.S. where “expected life remaining” at age 25 rose by around five years from 1996 to 2006.2 In this study education level is a proxy for socio-economic class, and it is clear that the life expectancy gap between the lower and higher groups is widening.

South African data on mortality rates by income level highlights the huge differences where those in the lowest income class are subject to between 7 and 10 times worse mortality than those in the highest income levels.
.....
However, data charting the percentage change in per capita GDP and life expectancy in the U.S. for the years 1910 to 2012 reveals a clear trend of increasing life expectancy by negative change in GDP. Counter-intuitively it seems mortality may actually fall during economic downturns.

A correlation definitely exists between macro-economic activity and total mortality for all causes.3 Data from 23 OECD countries highlights this effect. Mortality decreases by 0.4% for each 1% increase in unemployment, mainly driven by a reduction in vehicle accident deaths offset by an increase in deaths by suicide and homicide.4 Similar patterns are seen in U.S. data where mortality due to heart disease, liver disease, influenza and pneumonia all decrease during economic downturns.5

A study from 1980 to 1997 in Spain shows that the effect of unemployment is negative on general mortality, sex-specific mortality and mortality for major causes of death. In other words, the death rate is positively correlated with the overall state of the economy and increases when joblessness diminishes during economic expansion.6

.....
A clear correlation exists between economic downturn and decreased mortality – even if this seems counterintuitive. While it is easy to explain a decrease in accidental deaths, the influence of economics on natural deaths is more of a mystery.

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  #144  
Old 01-19-2016, 11:14 AM
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http://www.thestar.com/life/health_w...udy-shows.html

The higher you live in a highrise, the lower your chance of surviving a heart attack.
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  #145  
Old 01-19-2016, 12:05 PM
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http://www.thestar.com/life/health_w...udy-shows.html

The higher you live in a highrise, the lower your chance of surviving a heart attack.
Quote:
Correction - January 19, 2015: This article was edited from a previous version to update a headline that mistakenly referred to heart attacks instead of cardiac arrests. As stated correctly in the article, the study examines the survival rate for cardiac arrest patients based on the floor they live on.
even though the article was corrected, the web link still says "heart-attacks"
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  #146  
Old 01-19-2016, 12:34 PM
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http://www.thestar.com/life/health_w...udy-shows.html

The higher you live in a highrise, the lower your chance of surviving a heart attack.
I can't help but think something else is going on (i.e. correlation not causation), but I can't put my finger on what it would be.

Survival rate outside high-rise was like 4%, and inside was like 2%, so it's a big change in survival rate, but not a big change in mortality.
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  #147  
Old 01-19-2016, 02:13 PM
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http://www.thestar.com/life/health_w...udy-shows.html

The higher you live in a highrise, the lower your chance of surviving a heart attack.
Seems reasonable, if emergency response time and time to hospital are critical factors. Gotta get up there, gotta get down. While the time in the elevator is probably not that much different, the wait to get an elevator might.
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  #148  
Old 01-19-2016, 02:47 PM
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I can't help but think something else is going on (i.e. correlation not causation), but I can't put my finger on what it would be.

Survival rate outside high-rise was like 4%, and inside was like 2%, so it's a big change in survival rate, but not a big change in mortality.

Higher in the high-rise = higher income = ....?
Just a guess. And I'm not even sure what replaces the ....
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  #149  
Old 01-19-2016, 02:48 PM
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Maybe higher stress
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  #150  
Old 01-19-2016, 02:49 PM
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Seems reasonable, if emergency response time and time to hospital are critical factors. Gotta get up there, gotta get down. While the time in the elevator is probably not that much different, the wait to get an elevator might.
Hmmm, then you're surely worst off in a true sub-urban or urban area where it takes longer to drive to the scene, and to the hospital.

So, urban low rise lower mortality than urban high rise lower mortality than rural areas.
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