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  #11  
Old 02-13-2018, 10:14 AM
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I think financial expectations (revenue/sales goals, unit profitability) are more stressful than hours, and so is having to solve vague problems with no straightforward solution, and being evaluated on the profitability of that solution.

If your job is 50 hr/week where your job is routine, and you know exactly what you need to do day in and day out, where you're insulated from things like politics and model profitability - or if you simply got a bunch of stuff to do that's simple but just needs to be done on time and you just have a lot of it, I wouldn't consider that to be all that stressful.

A 35 hr/week job where you aren't sure where your next pay check is going to come from would be more stressful imo.
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  #12  
Old 02-13-2018, 10:33 AM
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Then again, I start to feel like a whiner. Other folks (especially non-actuaries) work these kinds of hours all the time. To them, that's just life. But when I work these hours, week after week, month after month, I just feel drained.
My dad worked a very physically and mentally demanding job, roughly 50 or 60 hours a week, taking few vacations and constantly checking his voicemail on the vacations he took, for basically his entire career. He was the best at what he did, but he never got promoted or any substantial pay raise, because he was loyal to one company and didn't want to leave. He was eventually pushed out when the company went through some structural changes, and he has nothing to show for his hard work.

He has been complaining about it for the last 10 years (both while he held the job and now that he is disabled). He is bitter and angry and often makes comments about my job like "Must be nice to get a bonus every year", "I wish I could have worked from home, but that wasn't an option for me", etc.

At first that made me feel like I should be super appreciative of my job and work as hard as I possibly could. But after a while I realized that just because he thought my job was better than his, didn't mean that it was good enough. You can be working too many hours and still be working less than a surgeon or a waitress or a factory worker. You can be less stressed than someone else and still be experiencing an unacceptable amount of stress.

You're not a whiner. You're a human being who is interested in their quality of life, and there is nothing wrong with that.
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  #13  
Old 02-13-2018, 10:42 AM
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At first that made me feel like I should be super appreciative of my job and work as hard as I possibly could. But after a while I realized that just because he thought my job was better than his, didn't mean that it was good enough.


Telling someone that they should appreciate what they have because others have it worse is one of the most annoying ways to drag someone down.

I bet when your dad wanted a promotion, people were telling him he should be thankful he even had a job.

So I'm not mired in poverty, big whoop. I have bigger fish to fry.
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Last edited by Colonel Smoothie; 02-13-2018 at 10:45 AM..
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  #14  
Old 02-13-2018, 10:43 AM
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In my opinion, if the number of hours you're working each day/week is giving you a large amount of stress for an extended period of time and the salary you're getting isn't giving you the emotional justification then I'd say you're working too many hours.
This.

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You're not a whiner. You're a human being who is interested in their quality of life, and there is nothing wrong with that.
And this.
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  #15  
Old 02-13-2018, 11:17 AM
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If I'm interested in and engaged in the work, I'm much more elastic in terms of hours. If the "work" is annoying, extra hours are due to something dumb (bad systems, analyst didn't do it) or pure understaffing, the day will crawl by and weigh on my mind.

Oh, and I'll leave. I've had a hiring manager ask why I move jobs so much. I don't put up with stagnation and work that is not a test of my abilities. Sounds conceited. Maybe it is.
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  #16  
Old 02-13-2018, 11:32 AM
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Originally Posted by mathmajor View Post
If I'm interested in and engaged in the work, I'm much more elastic in terms of hours. If the "work" is annoying, extra hours are due to something dumb (bad systems, analyst didn't do it) or pure understaffing, the day will crawl by and weigh on my mind.

Oh, and I'll leave. I've had a hiring manager ask why I move jobs so much. I don't put up with stagnation and work that is not a test of my abilities. Sounds conceited. Maybe it is.
I would agree with this too. I'm sure I'm starting to look like a job hopper at this point, but I see no reason to stay at a job that is demanding but not rewarding, or that isn't demanding at all. I'll have to get off my butt and start applying places here soon, because I'm starting to feel like a potted plant where I am.
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  #17  
Old 02-13-2018, 11:32 AM
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I know that's kind of a silly question, but it's one I'm pondering a lot now.

We all have our long weeks. That comes with the territory. But my job is constantly a lot of hours, and I can truly never catch up. Things we've been promising for months just haven't happened, because we've had to focus on the problem of the day.

The last guy to hold my job is now leaving the company due to the stress. He doesn't even have another job lined up, that's how burnt out he is. Folks are wondering if I'll leave. I wouldn't want to give up the stock options I've amassed, so if I were to do anything, I'd probably post for another position in the company.

Then again, I start to feel like a whiner. Other folks (especially non-actuaries) work these kinds of hours all the time. To them, that's just life. But when I work these hours, week after week, month after month, I just feel drained.

I could take demotion, and I think that might help. But I'm not sure. It seems that more and more, my company's expectation is that everybody is supposed to work that hard, regardless of level, and if you're not willing to, we'll find somebody who is.

Thoughts?
You haven't actually said how long the hours you're working are though.....
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  #18  
Old 02-13-2018, 11:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mathmajor View Post
If I'm interested in and engaged in the work, I'm much more elastic in terms of hours. If the "work" is annoying, extra hours are due to something dumb (bad systems, analyst didn't do it) or pure understaffing, the day will crawl by and weigh on my mind.

Oh, and I'll leave. I've had a hiring manager ask why I move jobs so much. I don't put up with stagnation and work that is not a test of my abilities. Sounds conceited. Maybe it is.
I wish I had changed jobs more earlier in my career. I seem to run into understaffing situations and then I get tasked to fill the gap. The burnout becomes real.
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  #19  
Old 02-13-2018, 12:01 PM
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Originally Posted by Egghead View Post
I know that's kind of a silly question, but it's one I'm pondering a lot now.

We all have our long weeks. That comes with the territory. But my job is constantly a lot of hours, and I can truly never catch up. Things we've been promising for months just haven't happened, because we've had to focus on the problem of the day.

The last guy to hold my job is now leaving the company due to the stress. He doesn't even have another job lined up, that's how burnt out he is. Folks are wondering if I'll leave. I wouldn't want to give up the stock options I've amassed, so if I were to do anything, I'd probably post for another position in the company.

Then again, I start to feel like a whiner. Other folks (especially non-actuaries) work these kinds of hours all the time. To them, that's just life. But when I work these hours, week after week, month after month, I just feel drained.

I could take demotion, and I think that might help. But I'm not sure. It seems that more and more, my company's expectation is that everybody is supposed to work that hard, regardless of level, and if you're not willing to, we'll find somebody who is.

Thoughts?
I think your department needs to hire some more people.
You're losing one guy because of the stress and they're worried about you.
Hiring more would solve that problem, though I'm sure someone might object to the additional expenses. Perhaps there is some other area with down time in need of more work that can lend you an employee?
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  #20  
Old 02-13-2018, 12:08 PM
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I'm surprised no one has said it, but the answer to this question really is 42.
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