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  #1  
Old 02-13-2018, 04:59 PM
fastcount fastcount is offline
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Default phone interview - onsite interview

I had a phone interview that went really well, now they've invited me over for an onsite interview. Will the onsite interview be a continuation of the formal interview process? More technical/behavioral/situation questions? Or is it a formality, just to make sure I'm not awkward in person before proceeding with the offer letter?

Does anybody have any experience being the interviewee or the interviewer in this case?

FastCount
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  #2  
Old 02-13-2018, 05:04 PM
nonlnear nonlnear is offline
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Originally Posted by fastcount View Post
I had a phone interview that went really well, now they've invited me over for an onsite interview. Will the onsite interview be a continuation of the formal interview process? More technical/behavioral/situation questions? Or is it a formality, just to make sure I'm not awkward in person before proceeding with the offer letter?

Does anybody have any experience being the interviewee or the interviewer in this case?

FastCount
If you have to ask...
It is not just a formality.
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  #3  
Old 02-13-2018, 05:08 PM
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pete5383 pete5383 is offline
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If you have to ask...
It is not just a formality.
+1

I've called in people for in-person interviews and not given them the job. All it means is that you are in the Top X, for some relatively small value for X (maybe 3 to 7).

You just passed the first bar with the phone interview. That was preseason. in-person is the real deal.
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Old 02-13-2018, 05:15 PM
nonlnear nonlnear is offline
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Congratulations on making the short list though.
Good luck crushing the hopes of the remaining contestants!
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  #5  
Old 02-14-2018, 05:59 PM
fastcount fastcount is offline
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Thanks guys, I'll need to re-double my efforts and prepare even more since I've been told it'll be all day of interviews, meet the actual hiring manager, the VP of the group, and various other people.

I'm going to prepare to talk about my experience, and then the usual behavioral/situational questions. Anything else I should prepare?
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Old 02-14-2018, 06:25 PM
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pete5383 pete5383 is offline
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Thanks guys, I'll need to re-double my efforts and prepare even more since I've been told it'll be all day of interviews, meet the actual hiring manager, the VP of the group, and various other people.

I'm going to prepare to talk about my experience, and then the usual behavioral/situational questions. Anything else I should prepare?
Come prepared with a list of questions. If you are given a list of people you will be interviewing, tailor your questions to the interviewer. Talking to your manager - ask what your day-to-day will be like, what they would consider "success" in your job, etc. Talking to the VP - what is the vision for the group, what big projects do you have coming up, what are the biggest obstacles you'll face in the next 1 to 5 years.

This is just my personal attitude, but if I interview someone and they answer the question "Do you have any questions for me?" with "No, I don't think so," I consider that a point off. Show me that you've thought a lot about this, and you want all the information you can so you can hit the ground running. Over-prepare for this. You should run out of time with questions still on your list.

All day interviews are a slog. Get a good night's sleep. Good luck!
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Old 02-14-2018, 07:11 PM
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KimboSlice KimboSlice is offline
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At everywhere I've worked, the in-person interview is the "how do they fit with the team" interview. We've usually decided that the candidate is qualified and a good fit for the position, but now we want to figure out if they'd be pleasant to be around for 40 hours per week. For that reason the in-person interview is not a given.

Others have given great responses, but I would add to the list of how to prepare. Be prepared to be genuinely excited by and interested in the people you meet. A good hiring manager might make the final decision, but will defer to their team for opinions about you. For that reason, don't just focus on (who you think is) the most important person in the room. Ask people about themselves, like what drew them to the company, what has surprised them the most, or what they like best about their job. People love to talk about themselves. Keep an optimistic, curious attitude (which is tough for a full day, but worth it), and I'm sure you'll do great.

Good luck!
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Old 02-14-2018, 07:29 PM
Actuarial Exams Actuarial Exams is offline
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Originally Posted by KimboSlice View Post
At everywhere I've worked, the in-person interview is the "how do they fit with the team" interview. We've usually decided that the candidate is qualified and a good fit for the position, but now we want to figure out if they'd be pleasant to be around for 40 hours per week. For that reason the in-person interview is not a given.

Others have given great responses, but I would add to the list of how to prepare. Be prepared to be genuinely excited by and interested in the people you meet. A good hiring manager might make the final decision, but will defer to their team for opinions about you. For that reason, don't just focus on (who you think is) the most important person in the room. Ask people about themselves, like what drew them to the company, what has surprised them the most, or what they like best about their job. People love to talk about themselves. Keep an optimistic, curious attitude (which is tough for a full day, but worth it), and I'm sure you'll do great.

Good luck!
This is only true for large and established companies where almost everyone is disposable and useless.

At smaller companies, no one really cares if you're rude and a jackass. They just want the work done well and ASAP. These companies don't have the luxury of hiring 20+ people in a year and having a couple of superstars carry the team. These companies only have budget for 1 new hire a year and they can't afford to waste that money on an incompetent person who's "nice to be around".

I work at a mid-sized firm (~5,000 employees) and we ended up hiring a programming star as our actuarial assistant. He's a quiet guy and he's definitely not the most social person we interviewed, but we only got the green light for one extra hire and we needed someone to build complicated tools for us.

Within the first month, he programmed an innovative way to organize some of our data and was generating thousands of reports an hour while our old tool would take weeks just to generate half of what we need. The tool allowed our team to analyze data more thoroughly in the past and it actually saved our company millions of dollars.

We wouldn't have gotten this type of productivity if we went with the most social guy.

Now at a big company, on the other hand, programming prodigies like the kid we hired are already working there, so they can afford to hire a disposable worker who talks a lot.

Last edited by Actuarial Exams; 02-14-2018 at 07:35 PM..
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Old 02-14-2018, 07:42 PM
kingofants kingofants is offline
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Originally Posted by Actuarial Exams View Post
This is only true for large and established companies where almost everyone is disposable and useless.

At smaller companies, no one really cares if you're rude and a jackass. They just want the work done well and ASAP. These companies don't have the luxury of hiring 20+ people in a year and having a couple of superstars carry the team. These companies only have budget for 1 new hire a year and they can't afford to waste that money on an incompetent person who's "nice to be around".

I work at a mid-sized firm (~5,000 employees) and we ended up hiring a programming star as our actuarial assistant. He's a quiet guy and he's definitely not the most social person we interviewed, but we only got the green light for one extra hire and we needed someone to build complicated tools for us.

Within the first month, he programmed an innovative way to organize some of our data and was generating thousands of reports an hour while our old tool would take weeks just to generate half of what we need. The tool allowed our team to analyze data more thoroughly in the past and it actually saved our company millions of dollars.

We wouldn't have gotten this type of productivity if we went with the most social guy.

Now at a big company, on the other hand, programming prodigies like the kid we hired are already working there, so they can afford to hire a disposable worker who talks a lot.
How did you guys figure out that this kid was a programming star during the interview?

What educational background and past experiences does he have?
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  #10  
Old 02-14-2018, 07:46 PM
Actuarial Exams Actuarial Exams is offline
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How did you guys figure out that this kid was a programming star during the interview?

What educational background and past experiences does he have?
Comp Sci major from prestigious tech school as well as examples of his programming projects.

We also gave a 'supposedly' simple programming task during the interview. The tasks was thought up by our software engineering department.
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