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  #61  
Old 09-10-2019, 03:42 PM
3rookie 3rookie is online now
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Originally Posted by Agadefe View Post
What's wrong with being a relatively "bad" artist your entire life? I mean, assuming that your lack of success isn't a negative emotional barrier. Art is a profession that only the top small % can make a real living at it. If someone is a top 25%ile artist, they may still not be able to make a living (whereas a top 25%ile actuary would).

It's unclear to me why a top 25%ile artist would be unhappy continuing to exist in the art world and be part of the art community and produce art. Most of it would be very "good" from a layman's perspective too.
I see value in it. It becomes problematic if you cannot continue your craft due to injury/circumstance/aging out. I "owe it to" my child(ren) to give them the tools to adapt and survive.
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Originally Posted by Agadefe View Post
So for a little more background on my thought processes, one of the impetuses for this question is the story of a friend of mine.

Basically, she wanted to be an 'artist' photographer, and her parents supported her financially (nothing egregious, but basically paid for her to have a lower middle class life while she pursued her interests). She had a few showings here and there, was very active in the community, but never made any real money in it.

A few years ago, they basically said that they will no longer support her and she needs to start looking for a 'real job'. Without any particular reason for doing this.

She went into wedding photography and is now making a pretty decent living doing that. In fact, she recently made a Facebook post essentially thanking her parents for knocking "reality into her" and how even though it's not her dream, wedding photography is a great career and she's happy.

I know that kind of goes against my point in a way, but she was also fortunate/driven enough to become successful at wedding photography instead of being forced to get a retail job or something.

What exactly was wrong with what she was doing earlier? Why did her parents decide she needs to get a real job? She was very happy I thought, and she was certainly "trying hard", not just twiddling her thumbs doing nothing all day. They are well off enough to have supported her for her entire life and even after their death to live a modest life.

Full disclosure though, I'm confident their initial support wasn't based on my hippyesque thinking, but rather that they just didn't think women having careers mattered so they thought they'd just support her until she found a man (she ended up liking women, whoops).
Does she choose to work at straight weddings?

I think it is reasonable for parents to provide this kind of support to a point. As others have said, money can get in the way of one's development in other areas.
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Originally Posted by Sredni Vashtar View Post
You are financially dependent on an employer (yes you can switch, but you're basically always dependent on pleasing whoever pays you.)

Your average actuary is also emotionally stunted compared to an artist, due to spending all day staring at numbers instead of beauty.
I stare at 36-24-36, only if she's 5' 3".

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Originally Posted by Sredni Vashtar View Post
One could make a similar argument against SAHM's.
Or actuaries for that matter.
I agree
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  #62  
Old 09-10-2019, 08:11 PM
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Alright, beer's on me!

(I have cents for essentials.)
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  #63  
Old 09-12-2019, 12:12 PM
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Originally Posted by Sredni Vashtar View Post
...Your average actuary is also emotionally stunted compared to an artist, due to spending all day staring at numbers instead of beauty.


People that can't see beauty in numbers are the stunted ones.
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  #64  
Old 09-12-2019, 12:47 PM
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What about when my wife and I are gone? I think my children will probably live at least 20 years longer than me and I will hopefully be done earning money 20 years before that. What are they going to do for those 40 years? They can certainly do whatever they want with their lives, but I want to do what I want to do too and I am providing them all the resources they need so they can become productive members of society. If they want to be something less productive they will have to learn to live on less which is fine too.


I'm late to the thread, but I tend to agree with the posters questioning what will happen after the parents pass away, and basically setting up the next generation for failure (in financial terms, anyway).

Two things immediately came to mind:

1. Siblings. Because that's who the "supported" kid is probably going to turn to when the parents die. Regardless of the outcome, it's bound to cause some level of resentment depending on what (if any) support is offered then, or not. And how it impacts any inheritance. I realize no one technically owes anyone anything, but that's not how it plays out in reality, or in feelz.

2. I don't want to spend all my extra money supporting my kid who failed to launch if I don't have to. I have a very expensive hobby, I'd like to be able to pursue that (or other things) once my kid has left the nest.

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Originally Posted by Incredible Hulctuary View Post
For example, if your kid wants to be a champion ballroom dancer, but at age 28 after 17 years of training and competing they still can't win a single medal or dollar in pro competitions, do you put your foot down and tell them to either pursue another passion or get a regular job?
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Originally Posted by Agadefe View Post
What if they are very happy being a middling ballroom dancer? Placing 14th in a few competitions. Scratching out a few bucks here and there teaching kids to dance, but not enough to live a comfortable life without my patronage. Seems like a happy life to me if they really like dancing.
At the risk of outing myself, this is my hobby, so I'm going to nitpick a few things here for general education purposes.

Professional ballroom dancers don't make big money by winning or placing at comps with their professional partner. The prize money is peanuts. The money is earned via teaching lessons (to both kids and adults - mostly adults) and taking students (amateurs) to competitions. Maybe they own their own studio. Well renowned ones may be able to travel around the country and make money giving seminars/workshops. The glamour is largely a facade, most of them are not raking it in. Costumes (the dresses and such) are often provided to them via sponsorship agreements with the designer, since those are massively expensive as well. Also, you don't even have to compete to make a living as a ballroom instructor, though again, it's usually not a lucrative profession. They don't tend to live with their parents, but there's often multiple people sharing an apartment or other living space.



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Originally Posted by Lucy View Post
Also, artists don't earn salaries. They get sales and commissions. And they usually have a low-stress day job to make ends meet. (Or some other means of support.)
Depends. My sister is an artist. She's not a people person, so the series of "real money" jobs she has had have not exactly been "low stress" for her. She loves making art but it doesn't even come close to paying the bills, and she has always lived at home (i.e. parent's house). I think most of us here lose sight of the fact that most of our co-workers generally have a minimum level of intelligence and reasonableness and diligence that you don't always find in a factory or retail environment.

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Originally Posted by 3rookie View Post
I stare at 36-24-36, only if she's 5' 3".
RN
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  #65  
Old 09-12-2019, 03:09 PM
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People that can't see beauty in numbers are the stunted ones.


oh come on, beauty in loss ratios?
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  #66  
Old 09-12-2019, 03:26 PM
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...Depends. My sister is an artist. She's not a people person, so the series of "real money" jobs she has had have not exactly been "low stress" for her. She loves making art but it doesn't even come close to paying the bills, and she has always lived at home (i.e. parent's house). I think most of us here lose sight of the fact that most of our co-workers generally have a minimum level of intelligence and reasonableness and diligence that you don't always find in a factory or retail environment...
Yeah, I worded that badly. I meant they tend to take the sort of job that's done when you leave, to pay the rent.
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  #67  
Old 09-12-2019, 04:27 PM
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Yeah, I worded that badly. I meant they tend to take the sort of job that's done when you leave, to pay the rent.
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  #68  
Old 09-12-2019, 04:32 PM
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oh come on, beauty in loss ratios?
Loss ratios that trigger a year end bonus are beautiful things.
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  #69  
Old 09-12-2019, 04:39 PM
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Originally Posted by Sredni Vashtar View Post
I have mixed feelings. If my kid got into a philosophy PhD program, then yeah it would be really cool to make up the difference.

Otoh, there's a lot of terrible "artists" and a lot of people who just fall apart without a career.
because one of my sister's got a philosophy PhD. She's been able to support herself just fine.
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  #70  
Old 09-16-2019, 10:12 AM
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because one of my sister's got a philosophy PhD. She's been able to support herself just fine.
There is often a relevant Studio C.

Practical Philosophy
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