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Group & Health Core Exam Old Group & Health Design & Pricing Forum

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  #11  
Old 07-13-2015, 12:12 PM
psp-fifa-fan psp-fifa-fan is offline
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Originally Posted by DBactuary View Post
I used TIA for the outline and problems (multiple times), and then I used MATE for the notecards/lists. On Advanced, I had honed down my study method a bit, so I had a little more time, so I also read through the MATE outline quickly, but I still used the TIA as my primary source material and got the lists from MATE.

Also, TIA also has lists/notecards, so I compared the lists and brought in any that seemed rather different or ones that weren't included in MATE, in addition to adding just a couple of my own notecards for some of the formulas or lists that they did not include in the printed notecards.
Thanks! I think I will go with your method as well!

I saw you in the Specialty forum too, do you know if Specialty and Core have some overlapped materials? I just got a 5 on the Specialty exam, and thinking if I should take both Core and Specialty this October.

Thanks!
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  #12  
Old 07-13-2015, 01:08 PM
DBactuary DBactuary is offline
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Originally Posted by psp-fifa-fan View Post
Thanks! I think I will go with your method as well!

I saw you in the Specialty forum too, do you know if Specialty and Core have some overlapped materials? I just got a 5 on the Specialty exam, and thinking if I should take both Core and Specialty this October.

Thanks!
I wouldn't really say that they overlap. You can compare the syllabus of each and look at the chapters of the source material, and there isn't really any true duplication. As "Core" implies, it tests more of the overall health environment, legislation, pricing, a few ASOPs (used to be a lot more) and some retiree medical pension valuations (people hate this section). For Specialty, it pulls in a few random topics with ERM, appraisals, etc., assuming you have the background knowledge of Core.

Since you already got a 5 on Specialty, I'd say that you do have a better start on the Core material, since that is background information for a lot of the Advanced and Specialty exam. It won't be retested explicitly, but you have to have an understanding of how the system works and basic pricing/reserving knowledge to know how things might affect each other. In that sense, they could work well going hand in hand: by studying Core, you may get a little better sense of the mechanisms driving the specifics that you're trying to address in Specialty and by studying Specialty, you may get a further understanding of the basics that are being tested in Core.

That being said - make sure you have enough time to truly devote yourself to this. Taking two exams in one sitting is never, ever going to be easy. This will become your life for the next few months. If you can commit to that, these exams won't overlap, but they could be a little bit complimentary, and you were clearly very close to passing Specialty already, so it might work. Just be careful that you don't spread yourself too thin and get a 5 on both exams.

Good luck!
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  #13  
Old 07-13-2015, 03:33 PM
psp-fifa-fan psp-fifa-fan is offline
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Originally Posted by DBactuary View Post
I wouldn't really say that they overlap. You can compare the syllabus of each and look at the chapters of the source material, and there isn't really any true duplication. As "Core" implies, it tests more of the overall health environment, legislation, pricing, a few ASOPs (used to be a lot more) and some retiree medical pension valuations (people hate this section). For Specialty, it pulls in a few random topics with ERM, appraisals, etc., assuming you have the background knowledge of Core.

Since you already got a 5 on Specialty, I'd say that you do have a better start on the Core material, since that is background information for a lot of the Advanced and Specialty exam. It won't be retested explicitly, but you have to have an understanding of how the system works and basic pricing/reserving knowledge to know how things might affect each other. In that sense, they could work well going hand in hand: by studying Core, you may get a little better sense of the mechanisms driving the specifics that you're trying to address in Specialty and by studying Specialty, you may get a further understanding of the basics that are being tested in Core.

That being said - make sure you have enough time to truly devote yourself to this. Taking two exams in one sitting is never, ever going to be easy. This will become your life for the next few months. If you can commit to that, these exams won't overlap, but they could be a little bit complimentary, and you were clearly very close to passing Specialty already, so it might work. Just be careful that you don't spread yourself too thin and get a 5 on both exams.

Good luck!
Thanks! I think I'm just going to take Core and make sure I can pass it.
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  #14  
Old 07-17-2015, 02:52 PM
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TheNorthRemembers TheNorthRemembers is offline
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Like many others, I did TIA+MATE. Created my own outline based off the content in the two and re-worded/restructured to suit my learning style. Also made them nice and pretty with colors. This is extremely time consuming but it does help digest the mountain of lists we need to learn, and makes the process bit more engaging.. Use whatever technique fits your learning style, though.

Also, mnemonics. The more weird and vulgar, the better: helps retention. I'd post examples but they're way too out there, or I just forgot. But here's a PG-13 take on a classic biology mnemonic:
Kingdom-Phylum-Class-Order-Family-Genus-Species
Kinky-People-Come-Over-For-Great-Sex
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  #15  
Old 07-17-2015, 02:57 PM
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Originally Posted by TheNorthRemembers View Post
Like many others, I did TIA+MATE. Created my own outline based off the content in the two and re-worded/restructured to suit my learning style. Also made them nice and pretty with colors. This is extremely time consuming but it does help digest the mountain of lists we need to learn, and makes the process bit more engaging.. Use whatever technique fits your learning style, though.

Also, mnemonics. The more weird and vulgar, the better: helps retention. I'd post examples but they're way too out there, or I just forgot. But here's a PG-13 take on a classic biology mnemonic:
Kingdom-Phylum-Class-Order-Family-Genus-Species
Kinky-People-Come-Over-For-Great-Sex
Approximately how long was your outline? Was it basically just a series of lists or something more in depth?

Thanks!
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  #16  
Old 07-17-2015, 08:17 PM
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TheNorthRemembers TheNorthRemembers is offline
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Approximately how long was your outline? Was it basically just a series of lists or something more in depth?

Thanks!
It was shorter than both MATE and TIA-detailed. Hard to say how much shorter since I used larger font and spacing. Plus I "took out" (very small font and italicized so I knew to skip it, but could change it just in case) a LOT of material. But yes, they were just outlines. If it helps, I barely touched about half the Canadian stuff, the majority of names and smaller acts not named ERISA/HIPAA, and also quite a bit of regulatory and accounting where it just seemed too overwhelming to memorize and actually make good use of the material. Finally, I never wanted to get too specific. If an outline was built like "If A, then B. Except when C happens, where you MAY need to do D. But don't forget about this entire list of E!" Well F that, my brain can't process more than ABC. In general, I employed a broader, big ideas approach.
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