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  #31  
Old 06-13-2019, 09:42 AM
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Seems like Struppeck didn't think to do a CTRL + F for "morality" before publishing.
You could say that he didn't finish his paper to a "t".
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The quick site mods on here are very impressive
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  #32  
Old 06-13-2019, 12:01 PM
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  #33  
Old 06-17-2019, 06:15 PM
SinisterRobert SinisterRobert is offline
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This section from "Multi-Component Joint-Life and Last-Survivor" to "Expected Lifetimes" is killing me on TIA. Each section is not conceptually that hard, but I feel like I have to rewatch some videos multiple times to really understand the connections between the concepts. I purchased the Ross text so I'm hoping that reading that section will make it more clear as well.
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  #34  
Old 06-18-2019, 09:45 AM
VoosetheMoose VoosetheMoose is offline
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Hey all!

Just found out I failed the Spring sitting so I am looking to retake this in the Fall. I want to prepare as much as I possibly can between now and exam day, but I need a little help with my study schedule. I'm planning on doing the following:

- Reading Source Material (+ working problems to reinforce reading): 6 weeks
- TIA Videos + Problems (to review sections I am having a hard time with): 4 weeks
- Quizzes (review of all material): 3 weeks
- Practice Exams: 5 weeks

I want to make sure I am not spending too much time reading the source material, so does anyone have a schedule put together for this that I could possibly use as reference? It seems like it would take a lot of time just to look through every single section, figure out how many pages are in each, and then figure out how long it would take me to read each section. I'm hoping that someone on the Outpost at the least has a total page count for all the readings. Is anyone able to help me with this? I would really appreciate it.
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  #35  
Old 06-18-2019, 11:03 AM
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Originally Posted by VoosetheMoose View Post
- Reading Source Material (+ working problems to reinforce reading): 6 weeks
- TIA Videos + Problems (to review sections I am having a hard time with): 4 weeks
- Quizzes (review of all material): 3 weeks
- Practice Exams: 5 weeks
Coaching Actuaries carried me to a pass by the skin of my teeth thanks to a 5/5 on Time Series.
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  #36  
Old 06-18-2019, 11:20 AM
VoosetheMoose VoosetheMoose is offline
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Originally Posted by Levi View Post
Coaching Actuaries carried me to a pass by the skin of my teeth thanks to a 5/5 on Time Series.
I think that is what I am leaning towards using for quizzes and exams. Thinking about also buying the Mahler exams for extra practice.

That is not primarily what I am concerned about though. I am concerned with underestimating the amount of time it will take for me to read through the source material. Does anyone have any advice on that? (see my original post for context)
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  #37  
Old 06-18-2019, 12:24 PM
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Originally Posted by SinisterRobert View Post
This section from "Multi-Component Joint-Life and Last-Survivor" to "Expected Lifetimes" is killing me on TIA. Each section is not conceptually that hard, but I feel like I have to rewatch some videos multiple times to really understand the connections between the concepts. I purchased the Ross text so I'm hoping that reading that section will make it more clear as well.
It's been a few weeks since I've watched those videos, but if I remember them correctly, it struck me that TIA really went about the topic from a different angle than Ross. Ross builds all of his reliability material up from the topics of structures and structure functions, and then gets into questions of: 1) can you tell if the structure is functioning, 2) given probabilities of components functioning, what's the probability that the system as a whole functions, and 3) given survival information for components, what's the system survival function and expected lifetime.

With TIA, everything felt like more of a life contingencies angle. They'd often talk about one person dying before another, or last survivor of two. But the systems they worked with often felt limited in complexity. I don't think they mentioned structure functions much at all, and even then it might have been late in the game. There was even some comment about how they weren't going to focus on them, but if the CAS asks us a question specifically about structure functions, they think we can solve our way into it given the concepts they've talked about.

It just seemed weird, because Ross built everything from structure functions.

I started with ASM and reading all of the Ross material before I ever watched the TIA videos, so I was probably predisposed to prefer the structure function approach. But still, I really like the structure function approach. It makes bridge systems rather formulaic. I'm not sure how much it helped with k-of-n systems, since those seemed to just get their own unique formulas a lot, but conceptually it was nice to have underlying them. And if your k-of-n system has a small enough n, it was helpful a little. Random graphs were just trippy no matter how you came at them, but Ross did use minimal cuts to build up some formulas. I think minimal paths got a nod too, but I don't remember them being used all that much.

I don't know whether much of what I've written will be useful to you, except to say that I enjoyed a lot of the material more through the lens of Ross and ASM than TIA. If you're going to go through Ross, be prepared for a very different take on it. At some point if I have enough time, I'd like to go back through TIA in more depth, because I think mastering both angles on this topic would put someone in a really strong position.

And if there are any TIA problems in particular that you'd like to compare approaches on, feel free to post a few.
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  #38  
Old 06-18-2019, 02:40 PM
Acebelladona Acebelladona is offline
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I'm debating on whether to do this exam next. I just squeezed a pass out on 5, which I decided to jump on right after starting my first job since I already had some reserving experience from my internship.

I'm on a fairly sizable project right now so my plan was to knock out Online Course 1 and 2, then sit for either MAS-1 or Exam 6 come Spring, giving myself a fair amount of extra time to study.

I've heard horror stories about both MAS-1 and 6 for different reasons. MAS because it keeps changing with each sitting there is a limited pool of study resources to draw from, and the pass rate is horrifically low. 6 because it's almost entirely memorizing lists and is a miserable experience to prepare for.

Can anyone comment regarding this? Would gunning for MAS-1 be the preferable option or is either choice viable?
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  #39  
Old 06-21-2019, 09:56 PM
SinisterRobert SinisterRobert is offline
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I compared the source material (Ross textbook) to TIA on the section for Reliability Theory and Markov Chains and felt that TIA did a decent job of summarizing the material in an easy to understand way.
I've read past comments on this board that some people feel TIA isn't great for every section though (too detailed in the life contingencies section, for example).

If I am planning to use the entirety of both TIA and Mahler to study, which source materials and what sections would be best to refer to as primary study material rather than the study manuals? Likewise, which sections am I okay to just review in TIA and Mahler only?
I'm interested in reading the source material if it covers some topic more clearly or more closely matches the syllabus of the exam than TIA or Mahler.

Thanks!
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  #40  
Old 06-21-2019, 09:58 PM
SinisterRobert SinisterRobert is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Disreputable Dog View Post
It's been a few weeks since I've watched those videos, but if I remember them correctly, it struck me that TIA really went about the topic from a different angle than Ross. Ross builds all of his reliability material up from the topics of structures and structure functions, and then gets into questions of: 1) can you tell if the structure is functioning, 2) given probabilities of components functioning, what's the probability that the system as a whole functions, and 3) given survival information for components, what's the system survival function and expected lifetime.

With TIA, everything felt like more of a life contingencies angle. They'd often talk about one person dying before another, or last survivor of two. But the systems they worked with often felt limited in complexity. I don't think they mentioned structure functions much at all, and even then it might have been late in the game. There was even some comment about how they weren't going to focus on them, but if the CAS asks us a question specifically about structure functions, they think we can solve our way into it given the concepts they've talked about.

It just seemed weird, because Ross built everything from structure functions.

I started with ASM and reading all of the Ross material before I ever watched the TIA videos, so I was probably predisposed to prefer the structure function approach. But still, I really like the structure function approach. It makes bridge systems rather formulaic. I'm not sure how much it helped with k-of-n systems, since those seemed to just get their own unique formulas a lot, but conceptually it was nice to have underlying them. And if your k-of-n system has a small enough n, it was helpful a little. Random graphs were just trippy no matter how you came at them, but Ross did use minimal cuts to build up some formulas. I think minimal paths got a nod too, but I don't remember them being used all that much.

I don't know whether much of what I've written will be useful to you, except to say that I enjoyed a lot of the material more through the lens of Ross and ASM than TIA. If you're going to go through Ross, be prepared for a very different take on it. At some point if I have enough time, I'd like to go back through TIA in more depth, because I think mastering both angles on this topic would put someone in a really strong position.

And if there are any TIA problems in particular that you'd like to compare approaches on, feel free to post a few.
Thanks for your insight. I agree that the perspectives were quite different between TIA and Ross. I feel like I have a decent understanding of this section now after making flashcards and keeping it fresh in my mind, but I'll definitely come back to both TIA and Ross for this topic before the exam date.
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