Actuarial Outpost
 
Go Back   Actuarial Outpost > Cyberchat > Non-Actuarial Topics
FlashChat Actuarial Discussion Preliminary Exams CAS/SOA Exams Cyberchat Around the World Suggestions


Upload your resume securely at https://www.dwsimpson.com
to be contacted when our jobs meet your skills and objectives.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 01-16-2020, 09:23 PM
campbell's Avatar
campbell campbell is offline
Mary Pat Campbell
SOA AAA
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: NY
Studying for duolingo and coursera
Favorite beer: Murphy's Irish Stout
Posts: 91,343
Blog Entries: 6
Default RIP Christopher Tolkien

https://www.theguardian.com/books/20...r-dies-aged-95

Quote:
JRR Tolkien's son Christopher dies aged 95
Youngest son of Lord of the Rings author was responsible for editing and publishing much of his father’s work
Spoiler:
Christopher Tolkien, the son of Lord Of The Rings author JRR Tolkien, has died aged 95, the Tolkien Society has announced. The society, which promotes the life and works of the celebrated writer, released a short statement on Twitter to confirm the news.

The statement said: “Christopher Tolkien has died at the age of 95. The Tolkien Society sends its deepest condolences to Baillie, Simon, Adam, Rachel and the whole Tolkien family.”

Tolkien, who was born in Leeds in 1924, was the third and youngest son of the revered fantasy author and his wife Edith. He grew up listening to his father’s tales of Bilbo Baggins, which later became the children’s fantasy novel, The Hobbit.

He drew many of the original maps detailing the world of Middle-earth for his father’s The Lord of the Rings when the series was first published between 1954 and 55. He also edited much of his father’s posthumously published work following his death in 1973. Since 1975 he had lived in France with Baillie.

Tolkien Society chairman Shaun Gunner praised Christopher’s commitment to his father’s work and said: “Millions of people around the world will be forever grateful to him … We have lost a titan and he will be sorely missed.”

Charlie Redmayne, chief executive of HarperCollins UK, which publishes much of JRR Tolkien’s work, said: “Christopher was a devoted curator of his father’s work and the timeless and ongoing popularity of the world that JRR Tolkien created is a fitting testimony to the decades he spent bringing Middle-Earth to generations of readers.

“[He was] the most charming of men, and a true gentleman. It was an honour and privilege to know and work with him and our thoughts are with his family at this time.”

Tolkien scholar Dimitra Fimi hailed Christopher for enriching his father’s work. She said: “He gave us a window into Tolkien’s creative process, and he provided scholarly commentary that enriched our understanding of Middle-earth. He was Middle-earth’s cartographer and first scholar.”

In an interview with the Guardian in 2012, Christopher’s son Simon described the enormity of the task after his grandfather died with so much material still unpublished.

Simon said: “He had produced this huge output that covered everything from the history of the gods to the history of the people he called the Silmarils – that was his great work, but it had never seen the light of day despite his best efforts to get it published.”

His son was left to sift through the files and notebooks, and over the two decades after his father’s death, he published The Silmarillion, Unfinished Tales, Beren And Lúthien and The History of Middle-earth, which fleshed out the complex world of elves and dwarves created by his father.

“It’s enormously to my father’s credit that he took on that huge task. I remember the crateloads of papers arriving at his home, and no one could be in any doubt at the scale of the work he had taken on,” Simon said.

Although he worked tirelessly to protect his father’s legacy, he was not impressed by what he saw as the commercialisation of his work. He was famously critical of Peter Jackson’s Oscar-winning film adaptation of The Lord of the Rings. In a 2012 interview with the French newspaper Le Monde, he said: “They gutted the book, making an action film for 15-to-25-year-olds.”

He also said: “Tolkien has become a monster, devoured by his own popularity and absorbed by the absurdity of our time,” and that “the commercialisation has reduced the aesthetic and philosophical impact of the creation to nothing”.
__________________
It's STUMP

LinkedIn Profile
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 01-16-2020, 10:05 PM
Lucy's Avatar
Lucy Lucy is offline
Member
CAS
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Posts: 4,830
Default

RIP

I appreciated a lot of his work.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 01-16-2020, 10:56 PM
BlackPhillip BlackPhillip is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 1,350
Default

RIP
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 01-16-2020, 11:57 PM
Loner's Avatar
Loner Loner is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: The Third Half
Posts: 46,094
Default

Off to the Hundred Acre Wood.
__________________
2012 AO Rap Battle Champion
Co-Legend of the Water Cooler(TM)
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 01-17-2020, 06:40 PM
campbell's Avatar
campbell campbell is offline
Mary Pat Campbell
SOA AAA
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: NY
Studying for duolingo and coursera
Favorite beer: Murphy's Irish Stout
Posts: 91,343
Blog Entries: 6
Default

https://www.patheos.com/blogs/chaosa...utm_content=45

Quote:
Christopher Tolkien, rest in peace

Spoiler:
I have just a few quick words about Christopher Tolkien, who died Thursday, aged 95.

Christopher Tolkien will go down in history as a person who left behind a mighty literary legacy—of writings that were not his own. Rather, as the literary executor of his father, J.R.R. Tolkien, Mr. Tolkien edited and published almost two dozen of his father’s works after the elder Tolkien died in 1973.

The most enduring of these is The Silmarillion, published in 1977, the fruit of four years of Mr. Tolkien laboring on and organizing his father’s manuscripts. According to the New York Times, Tolkien scholars and fans around the world wondered just how much of The Silmarillion was his father’s work and how much was Christopher’s. As resourceful as a hobbit, Mr. Tolkien answered thusly:

In response, Christopher produced the 12-volume “The History of Middle-earth” (1996), a compilation of drafts, fragments, rewrites, marginal notes and other writings culled from 70 boxes of unpublished material. It showed that virtually everything he had published had come from his father’s hand.

Prior to that, as a sort of appetizer, Mr. Tolkien published Unfinished Tales (1980), a collection of unpublished stories from each of the three Ages of Middle Earth, accompanied by commentary by Mr. Tolkien. In the 21st century, Mr. Tolkien published another half dozen of his father’s works, ranging from stories from the First Age of Middle Earth, to Arthurian legends, to his father’s translation of Beowulf.

The Silmarillion
I want to focus here on The Silmarillion. This, along with The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit, is what I spent most of 1990 reading. These books changed my life. They inspired me to return to regular practice of my Catholic faith, after almost a decade away. And looking back, I think I can pinpoint the exact time when I, then a far-right conservative, began ever so slowly to inch leftward. It was the first time I read this passage in The Fellowship of the Ring, when Gandalf admonishes Frodo, who has just said that Gollum deserves death:

‘Deserves it! I daresay he does. Many that live deserve death. And some that die deserve life. Can you give it to them? Then do not be too eager to deal out death in judgment. For even the very wise cannot see all ends.’

“Even the wise cannot see all ends” would make a good subtitle of The Silmarillion. It is a story of hubris and pride, and especially covetousness, and of how ruinous these vices are. We see it in the opening paragraphs, with the first rebellion of Melkor at the beginning of creation. We see it in Aulë the Smith, a mighty Valar, who grows impatient for Ilúvatar’s plan for creation.

And we see it in Fëanor, greatest of the Elves, who leads a great host of them in rebellion against the Valar—in a dispute over jewels:
Then Fëanor swore a terrible oath. His seven sons leapt straight-way to his side and took the selfsame vow together…. calling the Everlasting Dark upon them if they kept it not; and Manwë they named in witness, and Varda, and the hallowed mountain of Taniquetil, vowing to pursue with vengeance and hatred to the ends of the World Vala, Demon, Elf, or Man as yet unborn, or any creature, great or small, good or evil, that time should bring forth unto the end of days, whoso should hold or take or keep a Silmaril from their possession.

For this, Fëanor and all who followed him in rebellion fell under the Doom of Mandos:

‘Tears unnumbered ye shall shed; and the Valar will fence Valinor against you, and shut you out, so that not even the echo of your lamentation shall pass over the mountains. On the house of Fëanor the wrath of the Valar lieth from the West unto the uttermost East, and upon all that follow them it shall be laid also. Their Oath shall drive them, and yet betray them, and ever snatch away the very treasures they have sworn to pursue. To evil end shall all things turn that they begin well; and by treason of kin unto kin, and the fear of treason, shall this come to pass. The Dispossessed shall they be forever.

‘Ye have spilled the blood of your kindred unrighteously and have stained the land of Aman. For blood ye shall render blood, and beyond Aman ye shall dwell in Death’s shadow.’

Doom and hope
There is more to the Doom, but these two paragraphs mostly sum up the rest of The Silmarillion: heroic yet vain effort, followed by tragic loss, again and again and again. It also sums up the story of us, of humanity. For our story is a story of tears unnumbered, of blood rendered for blood shed unrighteously, of treason of kin unto kin, of all things turning evil that we begin well, of dwelling in death’s shadow. The Dispossessed? That is us.

I said, “mostly,” however, because it is not all the rest of The Silmarillion. Prof. Tolkien was too much of a Catholic to not leave a glimmer of hope, a protoevangelium—a rumor of Good News—for the beleaguered souls, Elf and Man, suffering in Middle Earth. When Morgoth has laid waste to the land and the forces who opposed him are scattered, Prof. Tolkien tells us of Beren and Luthien:

Among the tales of sorrow and ruin that come down to us from the darkness of those days, there are yet some in which amid weeping there is joy and under the shadow of death light that endures. And of these histories, most fair still in the ears of the Elves is the tale of Beren and Luthien. Of their lives was made the Lay of Leithian, Release from Bondage….

I know my life would be much darker if those words had never seen the light of day. Thank you, Christopher Tolkien, for making sure they did. Receive the gift of men, the gift of Ilúvatar, and await that time when “Men shall join in the Second Music of the Ainur.”
__________________
It's STUMP

LinkedIn Profile
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 01-17-2020, 06:57 PM
Abused Student's Avatar
Abused Student Abused Student is online now
Member
SOA
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: The Eighth Circle of Hell
Favorite beer: Cold and lots of it
Posts: 42,301
Default

Bummer. He was one of the main people responsible for making sure that all of the LOTR stuff stayed true to his father's dream. With the new Amazon Prime series coming at some point, hope they have that set up to where it won't go off track.
__________________
GAME ON!!!!!!! Let your ness show. Join the D&D fun. Started but applications still accepted


Officially assigned the role of Dictator, 9/30/09. Bow to my whims.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:02 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
*PLEASE NOTE: Posts are not checked for accuracy, and do not
represent the views of the Actuarial Outpost or its sponsors.
Page generated in 0.21840 seconds with 9 queries