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  #21  
Old 06-09-2019, 11:17 AM
hrm57 hrm57 is online now
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I have accepted the offer.

So do you guys agree that it is viewed similarly to an internship in the eyes of employers?
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  #22  
Old 06-09-2019, 08:32 PM
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Originally Posted by hrm57 View Post
I have accepted the offer.

So do you guys agree that it is viewed similarly to an internship in the eyes of employers?
If your contract extends over 3 months, it will be longer than a typical summer internship. At least you can learn some basic computing or maybe even modeling techniques in actuarial work during those 3 months, so why not take that rather than underwriting job?

You can always look for a permanent full-time job before your contract ends. It does not matter what form of the contract job is considered, but it matters that what projects you will do and what skills you will learn from the contract job in next few months.
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  #23  
Old 06-10-2019, 12:58 AM
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I have accepted the offer.

So do you guys agree that it is viewed similarly to an internship in the eyes of employers?
Yes, and think of it as a multi - month long interview. I recommend setting up expectations with your supervisors from the beginning on what it would take to get hired full time and then having regular meetings to discuss whether you're in track for that.
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Don't you even think about sending me your resume. I'll turn it into an origami boulder and return it to you.
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  #24  
Old 06-10-2019, 06:11 AM
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Yes, and think of it as a multi - month long interview. I recommend setting up expectations with your supervisors from the beginning on what it would take to get hired full time and then having regular meetings to discuss whether you're in track for that.
Not bad advice but I probably wouldn’t recommend doing this “from the beginning”. The key is to get there and give it maximum effort. Be professional, work hard, be enthusiastic and get to know people. Then when you are a couple months in approach your manager and tell him/her how much you’ve enjoyed working there and you would love to make it permanent, along with some info about your specific contributions. I’ve hired contract types and I would be annoyed if they approached me on day one about full time.
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  #25  
Old 06-10-2019, 12:27 PM
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People here are all talking about 3 months, but I don't believe the OP has told us if he knows how long the contract job is actually for.

If your supervisor hasn't broached the subject of full-time possibilities, that is something I would want to mention before my time there is half-up. If the writing is on the wall, you will have a fair idea when the gig is up. If it isn't, give them every reason to have you stay on longer, of course.
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  #26  
Old 06-10-2019, 01:01 PM
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Originally Posted by Klaymen View Post
People here are all talking about 3 months, but I don't believe the OP has told us if he knows how long the contract job is actually for.

If your supervisor hasn't broached the subject of full-time possibilities, that is something I would want to mention before my time there is half-up. If the writing is on the wall, you will have a fair idea when the gig is up. If it isn't, give them every reason to have you stay on longer, of course.
I was told around 5 months.
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  #27  
Old 06-11-2019, 04:11 PM
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Not bad advice but I probably wouldn’t recommend doing this “from the beginning”. The key is to get there and give it maximum effort. Be professional, work hard, be enthusiastic and get to know people. Then when you are a couple months in approach your manager and tell him/her how much you’ve enjoyed working there and you would love to make it permanent, along with some info about your specific contributions. I’ve hired contract types and I would be annoyed if they approached me on day one about full time.
Immediately imo. If OP's manager gets annoyed at the question then that's an important data point to have on the likelihood of coverting to full time and the urgency at which they need to be looking elsewhere.

Contract jobs are short, OP doesn't have time to be messing around.
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Don't you even think about sending me your resume. I'll turn it into an origami boulder and return it to you.
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  #28  
Old 06-11-2019, 04:35 PM
bsanders33 bsanders33 is offline
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Originally Posted by Colonel Smoothie View Post
Immediately imo. If OP's manager gets annoyed at the question then that's an important data point to have on the likelihood of coverting to full time and the urgency at which they need to be looking elsewhere.

Contract jobs are short, OP doesn't have time to be messing around.
“Looking elsewhere” also involves time, energy, and effort. My advice to OP would be to go all in on this shot. Really work hard, learn, and gain experience from it. And if you’ve got enough extra energy, see if you can add an exam to your resume.

Then maybe 3-4 months in, after you’ve shown some things, start asking about full time. And if the vibes are no, start focusing some energy on your search.

Jmo but I can see it both ways. My personal experience has been that employees who are searching for another job are generally distracted and unproductive employees
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  #29  
Old 06-11-2019, 04:58 PM
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I guess I'll split the difference between CS and bs: Nothing wrong with bringing it up on day 1, but you have to keep in mind that at that point you've shown them nothing that justifies them actually choosing to hire you, and they've already taken a (small) risk on you by offering you the contract. So, before you get pushy, you need to prove yourself. And actuaries in general are so milquetoast, almost any comment can be taken as pushy.

So, IMO, day 1 you should make sure that they know you want a permanent position (it's assumed anyway), and be asking "What can I do that would make me valuable enough to the company that they would decide to hire me?".

But, "Hey can you help me find a permanent position here" won't be well-received until after you've spent a few weeks (at least) beating their expectations. Five months is actually a decent amount of time comparatively, so I would suggest getting halfway through before you push the issue - can easily ask at that point to meet and discuss their view of your performance, which should tell you all you need to know.
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  #30  
Old 06-11-2019, 05:01 PM
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Originally Posted by Colonel Smoothie View Post
Immediately imo. If OP's manager gets annoyed at the question then...
You act like the information this provides is the only relevant part of the exchange. How the exchange might change the manager's view of the OP is also very relevant. If manager feels (correctly or not) that "this person isn't a perfect fit, but I'm willing to give them a shot and hopefully they appreciate that I'm taking a chance on somebody that's barely qualified and we'll see what their performance shows", then you could easily turn them off before they even got a chance to see whether your work was any good.
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