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  #61  
Old 09-17-2014, 03:12 PM
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http://newoldage.blogs.nytimes.com/2...f=health&_r=1&

Quote:
How should we think about the onset of older age?

A.
We should consider people as old when they near the end of their life: when their remaining life expectancy is 15 years or less. Let’s take two 65-year-olds. Say one has a remaining life expectancy of five years. One has a remaining life expectancy of 25 years. Which one is aging faster?

We would say the first one, because she’s so much closer to the end of her life. The second one is still far from the end of her life. She’s effectively younger.

Q.
What would this mean in the United States?

A.
In 2010, if you used our definition, men would start being classified as “old” when they reached the age of 69.2 years old and women when they reached the age of 72.3 years old.


.....
Hand-grip strength is an amazingly good predictor of future rates of mortality and morbidity, or sickness. It’s been measured for individuals in surveys across the world. We now have comparable data on about 50,000 people from the U.S., many European countries, Japan, South Korea, China. A substantial body of research suggests that this can be used as a reliable predictor of aging.

Q.
Tell me about the study you just published.

A.
We know there are important differences in the U.S. in life expectancy among groups with different levels of education. We decided to compare men and women with low education — those who never graduated from high school — with those with higher education. We wanted to compare them in terms of how rapidly they were aging based on their hand grips.

Q.
What did you find?

A.
A 65-year-old white woman with low education had the same hand-grip strength as a 69.5-year-old white woman with more education. The woman with low education had an age disadvantage of about 4.5 years. She was more like an old person than the woman with higher education.

For a 65-year-old white man, the difference was 4.6 years. For African-American women, the more educated women had a 3.5-year advantage. For African-American men, there was no difference between people with low and higher education. We don’t understand that finding, but we think it’s interesting and something we need to follow up on.

Q.
What are the implications?

A.
Measuring hand-grip strength is very simple and cheap. We think every primary care doctor should have a dynamometer in their office. At every visit, the doctor could check grip strength for older patients. If someone was in the 45th percentile for their age and the measurements were stable, great. But if that person suddenly dropped to the 25th percentile, then that’s a sign that the doctor should look seriously at what might be going on.

We view this in a larger context. There are going to be more measures than this one. We want to look next at measures of lower-body strength. It may very well be a measure that looks at how long it takes someone to rise from a chair. Then, we will have an upper-body measure and a lower-body measure, and we can compare the two in terms of how aging goes. We envision one day that physicians will have standard age-related tables for these measures and chart their patients’ progress, just as they do with height and weight for children.


Study linked:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18489802

Quote:
Hand-grip dynamometry predicts future outcomes in aging adults.
Bohannon RW.
Author information
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:
One use of clinical measures is the prediction of future outcomes. The purpose of this systematic review was to summarize the literature addressing the value of grip strength as a predictor of important outcomes.
METHODS:
Relevant literature was located using 4 bibliographic databases, searching article reference lists, and perusing personal files.
RESULTS:
Forty-five relevant research articles were found. The research involved both healthy subjects and patients; it tended to focus on middle-aged and older adults. The primary outcome addressed was mortality/survival (24 articles), but disability (9 articles), complications and/or increased length of stay (12 articles), and other outcomes were also examined. Low grip strength was shown consistently to be associated with a greater likelihood of premature mortality, the development of disability, and an increased risk of complications or prolonged length of stay after hospitalization or surgery.
CONCLUSIONS:
Given its predictive validity and simplicity, dynamometrically measured grip strength should be considered as a vital sign useful for screening middle-aged and older adults.
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  #62  
Old 10-30-2014, 04:32 PM
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http://www.theatlantic.com/entertain...doomed/382067/

"Pop Stars Actually Do Die Too Young". The article even looks at accidents and suicide as CoD!
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  #63  
Old 10-30-2014, 04:36 PM
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and for related stories on the side...

http://www.theatlantic.com/health/ar...t-work/382159/

Quote:
Elsewhere in the world, a leading cause of death is work itself. This problem is particularly acute in Japan, a country where social outings are often viewed as a professional responsibility. Officially, Japanese people work fewer hours per year than Americans, but this figure is misleading due to the prevalence of unpaid overtime work. Death from overwork—referred to as kuroshi—is so common that insurance companies compensated 813 families for it in 2012.

In China, where employees often lack union protection, an estimated 1,600 people die each day from overwork. Workplace deaths have also surfaced in South Korea, Indonesia, and even in the United Kingdom, where a 21-year-old Bank of America intern died last year after pulling three "all-nighter" shifts in a row.

Although overwork has not been directly linked to deaths in the United States, professional stress in this country has attracted notice as a growing problem. One factor is technology: Email and mobile phones make it easier for people to be "on call" even when they're not supposed to be working. A 2008 Pew Research survey found that 22 percent of American workers are expected to check work email while they're not at work, while half do so on weekends. Mother Jones found that the percentage of professional and middle-income Americans who worked more than 50 hours per week rose considerably in the 30 years from 1977, years that have coincided with wage growth stagnation.

Despite these trends, you're still statistically likelier to die at work from a transportation accident, an altercation with another person or animal, or an accident with workplace equipment.

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  #64  
Old 11-04-2014, 04:10 PM
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SOUTH KOREA

http://www.lifehealthpro.com/2014/10...916&page_all=1

Quote:
(Bloomberg) -- South Korea’s insurers have been told by regulators to boost capital to prepare for an aging population, with the United Nations predicting a world-beating average life expectancy of 95.5 years by the end of the century.

The Financial Supervisory Service will from next year require insurance companies hold capital at a level that gives a 99 percent probability they’ll be able to absorb losses when credit risks are taken, up from 95 percent now. Korean Reinsurance Co. sold $200 million of 30-year hybrid securities for the first time on Oct. 14 while Heungkuk Fire & Marine Insurance Co. sold 60 billion won ($57 million) of subordinated bonds last month.

Stung by the near-collapse of American International Group Inc. during the 2008 financial crisis, global insurance watchdogs have been forcing operators to strengthen their balance sheets. Korean regulators are also considering using a longevity risk measure when weighing risk-based capital ratios, given the country has a population aging faster than Japan.

.....
“With the aging population and low birth rate, insurers may need to prepare for increasing pension payments,” Kang Su Won, an official in the FSS’s prudential supervision team in the insurancesupervision department, said by phone Oct. 27. “Insurers may need to act preemptively by increasing capital because there are some concerns over negative spread margin amid the low interest rate environment.”

.....
“The aging society with increasing post-retirement needs and increasing risk awareness is driving potential growth in pension-related, long term health care and protection-type products,” Stella Ng, an analyst at Moody’s Investors Service in Hong Kong, said. “Capital raising through the issue of hybrid or subordinated debt will be a relatively easier and faster alternative to issuing new shares given the challenging economic environment.”

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  #65  
Old 11-11-2014, 09:24 AM
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More about what people think of mortality trends

http://news.yahoo.com/how-long-will-...211306576.html

Quote:
In 1992, the University of Michigan's Health and Retirement Study asked 26,000 Americans over the age of 50 what they thought the chances were they'd live to the age of 75. Now, nearly 24 years later, researchers at the Brookings Institution have calculated to see if they were right.

"In general, people wildly underestimated their chances of reaching 75," Christopher Ingraham writes on the Post's Wonk Blog.

• In 1992, 7 percent of respondents gave themselves "zero" chance to reach 75. But nearly half (49.2 percent) lived to 75 or longer.

• Among respondents who gave themselves a 50 percent chance of living to 75, 75 percent lived to that age or longer.

• And among those who said they were "100 percent" certain of living to the age of 75, nearly 8 in 10 (78.2 percent) did.
.....
There is no clear relationship between how long people think they'll live, and how long they actually do, Ingraham notes.

In fact, respondents who gave themselves at least a 10 percent chance of living to 75 had at least a 60 percent chance of doing so.

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  #66  
Old 11-11-2014, 11:13 AM
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"There is no clear relationship between how long people think they'll live, and how long they actually do, Ingraham notes."

The numbers given suggest a positive correlation, though.
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  #67  
Old 11-15-2014, 06:28 AM
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http://www.popsci.com/article/scienc...inds-no-secret

Quote:

Is the secret to long life in a gene? We don't know, for now. A recent project to read the entire DNA sequence of 17 people aged 110 or older has found… there's nothing particularly different from ordinary folks.

It is known that super-longevity is inheritable. It runs in families. An analysis of twins suggests human lifespan is 20 to 30 percent genetic. In super-long-lived people, that proportion is higher. Supercentenarians, or those that live past 110, don't have different smoking, drinking, eating, or exercising habits than the rest of us. It's in their genes. But where?

One team of geneticists from California and Washington State tried to find out by seeking a single gene variant in their 17 supercentenarians. They wanted a variant that would appear in all the supercentenarians, but not in other folks. That's when they didn't find anything.

It's possible this variant doesn't exist. Maybe it's certain combinations of genes that do the trick. Or perhaps every family with members that reach 110 and over does it with different, family-specific genes, Stuart Kim, the study's lead researcher and a biologist at Stanford University, told Live Science. If that's the case, there would not be a common thread to be found among all supercentenarians.

Tantalizingly, it's also possible that the team simply didn't have enough people in their study to find what they sought. The team members are making their gene data publicly available, so other researchers may continue the search, Kim told Live Science.
hey! more people live past 110 so they can increase their sample size!
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Old 01-26-2015, 07:50 PM
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graphing trends of 10 unusual causes of death

http://www.prooffreader.com/2015/01/...-of-death.html

Quote:
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control maintains a data service called WONDER (Wide-ranging OnLine Data for Epidemiologic Research); among its databases is the Compressed Mortality File tracking underlying cause of death from 1968 to 2012.

The causes of death are taken from the International Classification of Diseases (which contains an enormous number of causes of death that are not what I would call diseases, such as being struck by a train). It went through revisions in 1979 and 1999, so the categories do not match up cleanly through every year. For example, after 1978 "transvestitism" is no longer listed as a possible cause of death. (I'm not making this up. There are no deaths attributed to transvestitism in this database, but it's there in the schema, so perhaps it was assigned to someone before 1968)


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Old 01-27-2015, 12:56 AM
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Who knew being struck by a dog was fatal.
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Old 01-27-2015, 07:17 AM
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If I throw a dog at you, you'll feel it.
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