Actuarial Outpost
 
Go Back   Actuarial Outpost > Actuarial Discussion Forum > Careers - Employment
FlashChat Actuarial Discussion Preliminary Exams CAS/SOA Exams Cyberchat Around the World Suggestions

DW Simpson
Actuarial Jobs

Visit our site for the most up to date jobs for actuaries.

Actuarial Salary Surveys
Property & Casualty, Health, Life, Pension and Non-Tradtional Jobs.

Actuarial Meeting Schedule
Browse this year's meetings and which recruiters will attend.

Contact DW Simpson
Have a question?
Let's talk.
You'll be glad you did.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #41  
Old 06-26-2015, 08:02 PM
Canadiens Fan Canadiens Fan is offline
Member
SOA
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Canada
Studying for ILA - Life Pricing
Favorite beer: Blanche de Chambly
Posts: 4,014
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain Oveur View Post
And high school is pretty freaking easy, but I'm going with "If you got bad grades in high school, you're probably not that smart".
I think you can extend that to say that it's not that much of an achievement to get good grades in HS. College GPA is thus where it's at. I can't believe people think that getting high SAT or ACT scores are that big indicators of intelligence.
__________________
ASA
RT FE ERM DMAC
LP LFV LRM
FAC PEC
Reply With Quote
  #42  
Old 06-26-2015, 10:25 PM
Sloop John B's Avatar
Sloop John B Sloop John B is online now
Member
SOA
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: The Windy Apple
Posts: 2,419
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by actuarying View Post
The whole higher admissions standards equals tougher competition equals harder curve thing is just false. First as someone else alluded to, admissions are based on what you did in high school. Getting amazing grades in high school doesn't make you a genius. Second, in Canada a lot of students tend to stay where they grew up for school. There are some super smart people that could have gotten into Toronto McGill whatever but chose a "lesser" school because it's close to home.
So what do you use instead of a mix between high school grades and standardized testing?

You do realize that both McGill and Toronto are both very widely recognized internationally? So you have very intelligent people coming from across the world to study there, not sure the same can be said of University of Canadian Podunk.
Reply With Quote
  #43  
Old 06-26-2015, 11:16 PM
Kanye West's Avatar
Kanye West Kanye West is offline
Member
Non-Actuary
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
College: American Academy of Art - Dropout
Posts: 815
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ngphan84 View Post
Most people who think they're cool and like to have fun aren't actually that cool. And their "fun" isn't all that much fun.
Cool story

Spoiler:

bro,
Spoiler:

needs more pictures.

Reply With Quote
  #44  
Old 06-27-2015, 12:15 AM
actuarying actuarying is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 142
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sloop John B View Post
So what do you use instead of a mix between high school grades and standardized testing?

You do realize that both McGill and Toronto are both very widely recognized internationally? So you have very intelligent people coming from across the world to study there, not sure the same can be said of University of Canadian Podunk.
You're misinterpreting my point. All I'm trying to say is that higher admissions standards don't necessarily mean that you are going to be competing for grades in university and thus suffer from the curve.
School rankings have little to do with academic rigor and a lot to do with the publication records of the faculty of that school.
Reply With Quote
  #45  
Old 06-27-2015, 02:58 AM
Canadiens Fan Canadiens Fan is offline
Member
SOA
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Canada
Studying for ILA - Life Pricing
Favorite beer: Blanche de Chambly
Posts: 4,014
Default

To me, someone who had top grades in High School basically studied harder than others. You don't need special intelligence to do well in HS. Once these kids go to university and struggle with proofs involving sequences and series, that's when you know that it was all about those private tutors in HS.
__________________
ASA
RT FE ERM DMAC
LP LFV LRM
FAC PEC
Reply With Quote
  #46  
Old 06-27-2015, 11:56 AM
Fracktuary Fracktuary is offline
Member
CAS
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 1,756
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Canadiens Fan View Post
To me, someone who had top grades in High School basically studied harder than others. You don't need special intelligence to do well in HS. Once these kids go to university and struggle with proofs involving sequences and series, that's when you know that it was all about those private tutors in HS.
I used to tutor BC calculus, most of my students ended up with high grades. I don't think they inherently understood the material though.
Reply With Quote
  #47  
Old 01-05-2018, 01:54 AM
764dak's Avatar
764dak 764dak is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 898
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fracktuary View Post
I used to tutor BC calculus, most of my students ended up with high grades. I don't think they inherently understood the material though.
Did you show them proofs?
Reply With Quote
  #48  
Old 01-05-2018, 11:36 AM
terrytao terrytao is offline
Member
SOA
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 30
Default

This thread makes me chuckle. I'm the epitome of 'low gpa from a top school' actuary.

I went to a low tier ivy (not HYPW), didn't study and nearly flunked out, had to be reinstated twice, somehow graduated with 2.5 gpa in 6 years. I'm not terrytao-smart, but consider myself smart enough to have been successful in college - USAMO participant in HS, maintained 4.0 GPA first 3 semesters until things fell apart.

After college, got a typical actuarial analyst job right away. Hated it but sucked it up for a few years then switched job twice since. (Remember, nobody gives a f about your GPA after your first job. I don't even remember disclosing my GPA for my first job). For all intents and purposes it turned out fine - FSA, max job security, decent pay (high end in published survey ranges), low stress work, 40hr schedule.

Yet, I consider myself as a failure and still to this day, every f day, torment over how I screwed up so badly in college. Only if I knew better... Some of it is pure jealousy as a lot of my buddies work in PE, VC or HF, easily clearing 5x, 10x what I'm making. I also don't like my current company - it's not meritocratic enough. However, the biggest part of my regret is from the fact that actuarial work is terribly boring. I don't know, maybe it's just my line of work. Maybe I'm being naive and misguided about what IB quants or SV techies do day to day. But running GGY Axis and projecting balance sheet for 50 years with garbage assumptions and scenarios, which no one but regulator cares? C'mon man. I've tried getting out of actuarial/insurance industry, but it's getting harder as my pay goes up and my experience becomes more irrelevant.

My 2 cents - 1) get good GPA wherever you are, whether your school is top-tier or mediocre 2) do you really wanna be an actuary if you go to a top school?
Reply With Quote
  #49  
Old 01-05-2018, 11:57 AM
ronaldy27's Avatar
ronaldy27 ronaldy27 is offline
Member
CAS
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: The South
Studying for the credential
Posts: 2,954
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by terrytao View Post
This thread makes me chuckle. I'm the epitome of 'low gpa from a top school' actuary.

I went to a low tier ivy (not HYPW), didn't study and nearly flunked out, had to be reinstated twice, somehow graduated with 2.5 gpa in 6 years. I'm not terrytao-smart, but consider myself smart enough to have been successful in college - USAMO participant in HS, maintained 4.0 GPA first 3 semesters until things fell apart.

After college, got a typical actuarial analyst job right away. Hated it but sucked it up for a few years then switched job twice since. (Remember, nobody gives a f about your GPA after your first job. I don't even remember disclosing my GPA for my first job). For all intents and purposes it turned out fine - FSA, max job security, decent pay (high end in published survey ranges), low stress work, 40hr schedule.

Yet, I consider myself as a failure and still to this day, every f day, torment over how I screwed up so badly in college. Only if I knew better... Some of it is pure jealousy as a lot of my buddies work in PE, VC or HF, easily clearing 5x, 10x what I'm making. I also don't like my current company - it's not meritocratic enough. However, the biggest part of my regret is from the fact that actuarial work is terribly boring. I don't know, maybe it's just my line of work. Maybe I'm being naive and misguided about what IB quants or SV techies do day to day. But running GGY Axis and projecting balance sheet for 50 years with garbage assumptions and scenarios, which no one but regulator cares? C'mon man. I've tried getting out of actuarial/insurance industry, but it's getting harder as my pay goes up and my experience becomes more irrelevant.

My 2 cents - 1) get good GPA wherever you are, whether your school is top-tier or mediocre 2) do you really wanna be an actuary if you go to a top school?
What's W?
__________________
Spoiler - for size:



Reply With Quote
  #50  
Old 01-05-2018, 12:02 PM
Colonel Smoothie's Avatar
Colonel Smoothie Colonel Smoothie is online now
Member
CAS
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
College: Jamba Juice University
Favorite beer: AO Amber Ale
Posts: 47,482
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by terrytao View Post
Yet, I consider myself as a failure and still to this day, every f day, torment over how I screwed up so badly in college. Only if I knew better... Some of it is pure jealousy as a lot of my buddies work in PE, VC or HF, easily clearing 5x, 10x what I'm making. I also don't like my current company - it's not meritocratic enough. However, the biggest part of my regret is from the fact that actuarial work is terribly boring. I don't know, maybe it's just my line of work. Maybe I'm being naive and misguided about what IB quants or SV techies do day to day. But running GGY Axis and projecting balance sheet for 50 years with garbage assumptions and scenarios, which no one but regulator cares? C'mon man. I've tried getting out of actuarial/insurance industry, but it's getting harder as my pay goes up and my experience becomes more irrelevant.
There are ways out...assuming you aren't living paycheck to paycheck with that FSA salary of yours. You can get into banking if you get an MBA. Do you really care about a 50k pay cut if you can make > $1m in a few years? For tech...you can get a nice job after a masters or you can get your foot in the door at a lower level job and work your way up.

But, if you're unhappy just mostly because you're bored, could you not do something else with your FSA? There are some interesting actuarial jobs out there as well.
__________________
Recommended Readings for the EL Actuary || Recommended Readings for the EB Actuary

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wigmeister General View Post
Don't you even think about sending me your resume. I'll turn it into an origami boulder and return it to you.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:23 AM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
*PLEASE NOTE: Posts are not checked for accuracy, and do not
represent the views of the Actuarial Outpost or its sponsors.
Page generated in 0.23725 seconds with 9 queries