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  #11  
Old 12-08-2017, 07:55 PM
clarinetist clarinetist is offline
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For instance, the stats departments don't really deal with "AI". From an academic point of view, "AI" usually refers to specific topics within computer science like deep learning, robotics, computer vision, etc. It's not something that you will be doing in a stats department (as far as I can tell).
This is correct, at least given my experience in a stats program.

Stats profs are all about linear models, time series, experimental design, mathematical statistics, biostatistics, survey sampling, and statistical computing.

Specializing in something not related to the above will depend on you finding an advisor who specializes in the topic.
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  #12  
Old 12-09-2017, 04:52 PM
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What is your definition of "big bucks"? Give us some numbers.
For now, I'd say $200k+, which may not be a lot of money to some people on the board, but it is to me. In actuarial insurance, that's usually two levels up from the bottom, although sometimes you can get that much at 1 level up. Not sure if you can do that as an IC (somebody please give me an example if you've seen it).

In consulting, it's certainly possible to get there as an IC by billing a lot of hours or working on very lucrative projects.

If I stay in actuarial, I will certainly prefer the latter. In insurance, there are just a lot of VP positions that don't seem interesting to me (VP reserving, pricing, etc.), other than the pay. Heading an analytics department would be okay. However, even at that level I hear people telling me that it's difficult to procure resources for your team and really be able to run the department the way you want to - which leaves me scratching my head as to what level of seniority you'd have to be in order to really call the shots.

Anyways, the 2nd option would be preferable, although I do recognize that it will take a lot of work. I like how I don't have to climb the ladder that high to make it happen.
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  #13  
Old 12-09-2017, 05:04 PM
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As for the masters programs, my initial thought was that you should consider the University of Chicago. The tuition is pretty insane imo. Their program doesn't really seem all that good and the faculty there seemed to be focusing on things you will not find particularly relevant.

I'm just wondering why you're considering computer science instead of statistics. Is it also 60K a year for the statistics program? They have an excellent stats department.
Berkeley was the one that was 60k. I have been on the fence between stats and CS, but leaning more towards CS because I think it would open up a lot more software dev opportunities for me, and because I find it more interesting.

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For the 2017-2018 academic year, full-time tuition is $52,215. With a 25% partial tuition scholarship, each student is responsible for the remaining $39,161 as well as the $1164 Student Life Fee. All students are required to have health insurance. Most students enroll in the University’s plan at an annual cost of $3,615. Students with outside insurance coverage may opt out of the University’s plan, provided they can prove their coverage is comparable. All amounts listed are likely to increase slightly each year.
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Old 12-09-2017, 10:05 PM
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Speaking of AI, is anyone aware of the specialization of AI called Natural Language Progressing? Does this track earn "big bucks"? If I do have any interest in AI it would be this. Not big on Self Driving Cars or any sort of mechanical robotics.

For example, the people who worked on IBM's Watson that won Jeopardy must have been paid serious dollars.
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Old 12-09-2017, 10:14 PM
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Speaking of AI, is anyone aware of the specialization of AI called Natural Language Progressing? Does this track earn "big bucks"? If I do have any interest in AI it would be this. Not big on Self Driving Cars or any sort of mechanical robotics.

For example, the people who worked on IBM's Watson that won Jeopardy must have been paid serious dollars.
Unless you're working for something like Amazon, I find aiming for such a track is like choosing between Life, Health, and P&C for act sci.

You don't worry about it until you get a job in it, or when your job requires you to use it.

I'll have to do some NLP for my job, but I wouldn't be spending my time learning it otherwise.
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Old 12-10-2017, 08:28 AM
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He's never going to get anywhere near those salaries ($300K+) without a Ph. D

A Masters is quite simply not enough when you are competing at that level.
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Old 12-10-2017, 08:43 AM
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Somewhat true, yes.
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Old 12-10-2017, 10:39 AM
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Speaking of AI, is anyone aware of the specialization of AI called Natural Language Progressing? Does this track earn "big bucks"? If I do have any interest in AI it would be this. Not big on Self Driving Cars or any sort of mechanical robotics.

For example, the people who worked on IBM's Watson that won Jeopardy must have been paid serious dollars.
I'm familiar with NLP, I'm not really sure how much money you can get in specializing from it, though.

But, I'll tell you this - most of the data out there are unstructured, not structured - and that includes text. While you can get a decent job if you have some SQL skills and are good at manipulating structured data, if you really want to shake things up, be innovative, and enter unexplored territory, learning NLP and applying it to unstructured data is a step in the right direction.
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Old 12-10-2017, 10:48 AM
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He's never going to get anywhere near those salaries ($300K+) without a Ph. D

A Masters is quite simply not enough when you are competing at that level.
Does Levandowski have a PhD?

Anyways, if you look at companies that are specializing in AI, not everyone in staff has a PhD. I don't think they monopolize the well-paid positions, either. Consider your own company. Do the people who are making $300k+ all have PhDs?

A lot of people make over that much at my employer. Most of the ones who do have just a bachelors. I'm not interested in doing pure academic research, but I am interested in applying research that has been done by others to industry. I believe taking graduate level courses and getting familiar with the subject will benefit me if I want to do that.
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Old 12-10-2017, 10:57 AM
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Does Levandowski have a PhD?

Anyways, if you look at companies that are specializing in AI, not everyone in staff has a PhD. I don't think they monopolize the well-paid positions, either. Consider your own company. Do the people who are making $300k+ all have PhDs?

A lot of people make over that much at my employer. Most of the ones who do have just a bachelors. I'm not interested in doing pure academic research, but I am interested in applying research that has been done by others to industry. I believe taking graduate level courses and getting familiar with the subject will benefit me if I want to do that.
Actuaries don't really deal with big data, so the comparison does not apply. Also, there is little to gain in the Actuarial world beyond a Masters. The vast majority of higher ups at my company have Masters degrees. Few have Ph. D's.

My brother is in Big data (He is VP Global head of data now) so I can tell you something about his peers. They pretty much all have Ph.D's and some even both Ph. D & MBA.

So I'm sorry, but you will simply not be competititve with only a Bachelors if you go into Big data. You would most likely make it into management given enough time, but I doubt you would go beyond that.
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