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  #21  
Old 01-05-2018, 12:37 PM
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Originally Posted by ao fan View Post
i would never rate myself a 2/5 even if i thought that's what i deserved.
This is an employment thread, not a Tinder thread. :ducks:

Seriously, assuming 5/5 is best and 0/5 or 1/5 is worst (it's the reverse at my company), I rate myself a 2/5 all the time in certain areas. I set some pretty stretched goals, and I'm not afraid to tell my boss that I didn't knock everything out of the park. Overall, I'm consistently ranked as exceeding expectations, and was recently told I'm being promoted in a couple months, so I do good work. But I can't do everything at 100%.
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  #22  
Old 01-05-2018, 12:48 PM
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Originally Posted by kingofants View Post
So apparently everybody will be getting one these one-on-one meetings with the Director of the department.

I started work on August 15th, so it has only been 4.5 months for me.

We all submitted a self evaluation form. I scored myself:

3/5
4/5
3/5
N/A
2/5

on several goals set for me by my manager.

During the first 2 months or so I was well above average, at least on the technical side. But as the days go by the job has become more and more underwhelming and my lack of enthusiasm is apparent. Although that could just be considered your typical introverted programmer type personality. I am now a glorified data processor. The director has to keep reminding me that we will be automating all of these data processes every soon, and that this position will soon be a "true" DevOps position. I know that he knows that I'm bored, because that's what he told me during our interview before I was hired.

Also, I do not fit in with the company culture. They always have these excuses to go out and drink beers and eat at restaurants. I never go to them because of my diet.

So, what can I expect given all this?
Go, listen, and provide some feedback as needed. It's hard to not be intimidated by the director being present, but try to go into with an open mind and get more insight into how you are performing. Given my current situation, I would actual appreciate my director being a part of the discussion.

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Originally Posted by Climbing Bum View Post
I think HR just gives a budget and then everyone gets the same raises etc.

As far as I can tell the best way to maximize pay is in this order of effectiveness pass exams, work consulting, churn through jobs, socialize, dress well, show up consistently, put out good work.
I typically have seen that a budget is set for overall increases and then allocated based on performance. Not everyone will get the exact same but within the ballpark.

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Originally Posted by ditkaworshipper View Post
I agree that feedback should be more often than an annual review, particularly for EL. However, if this isn't happening outside of the formal review process, then this is a bad manager, not an insufficient review process. I can get behind semiannual reviews for the first year or two at a company from a CYA and ability to quickly promote or fire people perspective, but feedback should really be happening a few times per month on an informal basis. Formal reviews really are nothing more than a formality with a good manager.

I have been requesting additional feedback and haven't gotten much progress on that end. I am realizing it is just my manager's style.

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Originally Posted by George Frankly View Post
This is an employment thread, not a Tinder thread. :ducks:

Seriously, assuming 5/5 is best and 0/5 or 1/5 is worst (it's the reverse at my company), I rate myself a 2/5 all the time in certain areas. I set some pretty stretched goals, and I'm not afraid to tell my boss that I didn't knock everything out of the park. Overall, I'm consistently ranked as exceeding expectations, and was recently told I'm being promoted in a couple months, so I do good work. But I can't do everything at 100%.
Congrats on the upcoming promotion!
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  #23  
Old 01-05-2018, 01:03 PM
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Originally Posted by George Frankly View Post
This is an employment thread, not a Tinder thread. :ducks:

Seriously, assuming 5/5 is best and 0/5 or 1/5 is worst (it's the reverse at my company), I rate myself a 2/5 all the time in certain areas. I set some pretty stretched goals, and I'm not afraid to tell my boss that I didn't knock everything out of the park. Overall, I'm consistently ranked as exceeding expectations, and was recently told I'm being promoted in a couple months, so I do good work. But I can't do everything at 100%.
This is pretty much exactly how I operate, although I will tank my score on things I don't like to do that I'm objectively 5/5 as well. I do recommend grade inflation for the most part, particularly for early career people. You have to understand the system before employing this strategy effectively imo.
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  #24  
Old 01-05-2018, 01:09 PM
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Originally Posted by ditkaworshipper View Post
This is pretty much exactly how I operate, although I will tank my score on things I don't like to do that I'm objectively 5/5 as well. I do recommend grade inflation for the most part, particularly for early career people. You have to understand the system before employing this strategy effectively imo.
Yes to the underlined. Realistically, managers know who the high-octane employees are, and anyone rated 'meets expectations' or better can be promoted. Raises are decided independently by managers. So the overall rating doesn't matter a ton. That said, I did once rate myself 3/5 overall, and my boss said he wanted to rate me 4/5, but to make the whole 'bell curve' thing work he had to give someone a 3, and since I rated myself a 3, I got a 3. So I typically rate myself a 4 and get a 4. One of these years I'll get a perfect 5/5 (again, actually 1/5 at my company), but only about 2% of people get that rating.
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  #25  
Old 01-05-2018, 01:17 PM
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Originally Posted by George Frankly View Post
Yes to the underlined. Realistically, managers know who the high-octane employees are, and anyone rated 'meets expectations' or better can be promoted. Raises are decided independently by managers. So the overall rating doesn't matter a ton. That said, I did once rate myself 3/5 overall, and my boss said he wanted to rate me 4/5, but to make the whole 'bell curve' thing work he had to give someone a 3, and since I rated myself a 3, I got a 3. So I typically rate myself a 4 and get a 4. One of these years I'll get a perfect 5/5 (again, actually 1/5 at my company), but only about 2% of people get that rating.
I always think this is silly, the whole "no one is perfect". It's just a way to argue against raises. It's not you against perfect, it's you against a very strong year for the role you're in. If you're a brand new hire that doesn't mean you need to be making director-level insights to deserve a perfect score, in fact just making like 5 year analyst insights probably warrants it.

I'm often in the whole "you're doing great!" and then you get to end of year and it's "you're 4/5, that's great!". I want 5/5, not 4/5, so I'm usually challenging my manager to give me constructive criticism on how to reach 5/5, which is helpful at year end since the discussion can be more objective.
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  #26  
Old 01-05-2018, 01:23 PM
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Originally Posted by NormalDan View Post
I always think this is silly, the whole "no one is perfect". It's just a way to argue against raises. It's not you against perfect, it's you against a very strong year for the role you're in. If you're a brand new hire that doesn't mean you need to be making director-level insights to deserve a perfect score, in fact just making like 5 year analyst insights probably warrants it.

I'm often in the whole "you're doing great!" and then you get to end of year and it's "you're 4/5, that's great!". I want 5/5, not 4/5, so I'm usually challenging my manager to give me constructive criticism on how to reach 5/5, which is helpful at year end since the discussion can be more objective.
I'm not sure I like the bell curve thing we do, they will push back on managers to hammer things into the 'right' shape. My team is a really good example, I have three analysts, and two of them are really, really good. Sharp, motivated, not jackasses (that matters). And I've had to fight to give 2 people out of 3 'exceeds expectations.' Because the bell curve says I should only have 0.6 analysts in that group.

But, like I said, raises/promotions are basically at the manager's discretion, so we don't put too much stock in the ratings.
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  #27  
Old 01-05-2018, 01:25 PM
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I guess the moral is every company has a game to play with respect to reviews, ratings, raises and promotions. Hee haw, I suppose. If you don't like the hay at your company, maybe try the next farm.
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  #28  
Old 01-05-2018, 01:32 PM
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Originally Posted by George Frankly View Post
I guess the moral is every company has a game to play with respect to reviews, ratings, raises and promotions. Hee haw, I suppose. If you don't like the hay at your company, maybe try the next farm.
That's a pretty good summary (for corporates). It definitely took me years at my first company to realize how disconnected ratings were from anything else. Basically (and not uncommon in actuarial field) was, pass exams while not burning down the building and get promotions/raises regardless of rating. There was a very small opportunity set for non-exam-passers, regardless of rating (but could still do something if your ratings were exceptional). So, they spend all year talking about how this and that affect your rating and trying to get you to focus on this things, but they didn't really affect the things most people cared about.

Lots of "learn how to play the game" that matters early on. Total waste of time usually, but just the reality of corporate America.
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  #29  
Old 01-05-2018, 03:08 PM
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depends on the company, our company doesn't give annual salary raises, and bonus fluctuates very little
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  #30  
Old 01-05-2018, 03:27 PM
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Originally Posted by jyz002 View Post
depends on the company, our company doesn't give annual salary raises, and bonus fluctuates very little
So you periodically just walk into your boss' office and demand a raise?
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