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  #1  
Old 01-10-2018, 09:49 PM
kingofants kingofants is offline
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Default Does a company make the same offer to all Entry-Level Candidates?

So I am just wondering, suppose you have 3 candidates. All of them have 3 exams and an internship. All else equal except:

Candidate 1: Bachelor's degree in math
Candidate 2: Master's degree in math
Candidate 3: PhD in math

Suppose that all 3 did similarly well in the interviews and are given offers, will those offers be the same?




I am just asking this to see how it is at least in the actuarial industry, because the current company that I am in the process of interviewing with is a trading firm, and the role is a Junior C++ Developer. Got passed their coding challenge. Now onto the phone screen.

However, in the job posting there are explicitly seeking candidates who have Bachelors, Masters, or PhD. So I am just wondering if that will factor into their offer if I can get one.

Last edited by kingofants; 01-10-2018 at 10:04 PM..
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Old 01-10-2018, 09:59 PM
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When I was hired at my current job (with one exam and no experience) I was offered an additional $2,000/year because of my doctorate in mathematics.

There's some dated data for you, sample size n=1.

Nearly all job offers are going to involve a large number of variables more significant than the partition that you are asking about here.
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Old 01-10-2018, 10:06 PM
kingofants kingofants is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DoctorNo View Post
When I was hired at my current job (with one exam and no experience) I was offered an additional $2,000/year because of my doctorate in mathematics.

There's some dated data for you, sample size n=1.

Nearly all job offers are going to involve a large number of variables more significant than the partition that you are asking about here.
An extra 2 grand doesn't make me feel all that bad.

Except since the current position that I'm involved in is a coding position, so the difference between a PhD and Bachelor's offer may be significant.
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Old 01-10-2018, 10:12 PM
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Perhaps.

Generally, companies are going to make you an offer based upon your value to them. (Hopefully an obvious statement, but needs to be said here.)
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Old 01-10-2018, 10:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kingofants View Post
So I am just wondering, suppose you have 3 candidates. All of them have 3 exams and an internship. All else equal except:

Candidate 1: Bachelor's degree in math
Candidate 2: Master's degree in math
Candidate 3: PhD in math

Suppose that all 3 did similarly well in the interviews and are given offers, will those offers be the same?




I am just asking this to see how it is at least in the actuarial industry, because the current company that I am in the process of interviewing with is a trading firm, and the role is a Junior C++ Developer. Got passed their coding challenge. Now onto the phone screen.

However, in the job posting there are explicitly seeking candidates who have Bachelors, Masters, or PhD. So I am just wondering if that will factor into their offer if I can get one.
Some companies will give the same offer. Others will make adjustments for these things. It really depends on what they value.
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Old 01-11-2018, 12:23 AM
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Originally Posted by Colonel Smoothie View Post
Some companies will give the same offer. Others will make adjustments for these things. It really depends on what they value.


Could also depend on what their industry/competitors value.
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Old 01-11-2018, 12:38 AM
royevans royevans is offline
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I have a question. Would a doctorate who specialized in hyperbolic geometry make more than one that specialized in something like applied or computational maths... or do they value all phd's the same?
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Old 01-11-2018, 01:42 AM
tommie frazier tommie frazier is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DoctorNo View Post
When I was hired at my current job (with one exam and no experience) I was offered an additional $2,000/year because of my doctorate in mathematics.

There's some dated data for you, sample size n=1.

Nearly all job offers are going to involve a large number of variables more significant than the partition that you are asking about here.
n=2, albeit w 0 exams. same story otherwise.

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I have a question. Would a doctorate who specialized in hyperbolic geometry make more than one that specialized in something like applied or computational maths... or do they value all phd's the same?
for what we do, the area of math likely is a giant swing and miss on direct relevance. so all about the same. maybe a big data focused area (stat/data analysis) would be different.
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  #9  
Old 01-11-2018, 01:57 AM
extrovertedactuary extrovertedactuary is offline
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An old employer of mine bumped one analyst up a level for having a PhD, and another hired someone with a PhD and no experience into a role one level above the typical entry level. So some companies certainly value the degree. That is not to say it is beneficial to go to school for five years to get a doctorate if your goal is to work as an actuary.
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Old 01-11-2018, 02:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by royevans View Post
I have a question. Would a doctorate who specialized in hyperbolic geometry make more than one that specialized in something like applied or computational maths... or do they value all phd's the same?
Not all PhDs are the same, but it probably doesn't matter for most actuarial jobs.

-Riley
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