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  #491  
Old 01-26-2018, 04:56 PM
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YORK, NEBRASKA
POLICE

http://www.yorknewstimes.com/news/po...52642484c.html

Quote:
Police retirement age will be based on Social Security determination
Spoiler:
YORK – Rather than just saying that police officers have to retire at the age of 65, city regulations now say that the mandatory age should be based on the current social security determination.

The city council agreed this past week that this was a more fair way to go about it, so upon mandatory retirement, a police officer would have the ability to start collecting full Social Security benefits.

“I feel more comfortable with this,” said Councilman Barry Redfern. “I guess I couldn’t see how a person would serve for years and years and then have to retire without full Society Security benefits right away. I’m open to this compromise and version of the ordinance.”

“I agree,” said Councilman Ron Mogul. “How could we say you have to retire and then the person still can’t collect full Social Security for two years? And we still have the language on the books that outlines the performance requirements that have to be met by officers.”

“Now it saw that whatever the Social Security Administration says for full retirement, that’s what it is,” said Mayor Orval Stahr. “And as that moves up, this will move up.”

Right now, the full retirement age determined by the Social Security Administration is 67.

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“I think this is a good compromise,” said York Police Chief Ed Tjaden.

The council moved to suspend the rules and pass the ordinance. All voted in favor – Council member Diane Wolfe abstained due to a conflict of interest.


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  #492  
Old 01-28-2018, 06:56 PM
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PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA

http://triblive.com/local/allegheny/...enced-officers

Quote:
Pittsburgh might increase mandatory retirement age to keep experienced officers

Spoiler:
Pittsburgh intends to raise the mandatory retirement age for police officers to 70, up from 65, so it can retain experienced cops who choose to remain on the job.

City Council will introduce legislation on Tuesday that would change the City Code requirement for police officers to retire at age 65, according to Dan Gilman, Mayor Bill Peduto's chief of staff.

“What's happening now we have some of our best officers who are in great shape... who are being forced out,” Gilman said Friday. “They're simply going to other departments and being great leaders while collecting retirement benefits from the city of Pittsburgh. This legislation in no way forces anyone to stay. It gives the extra five years for those officers who are still in great health and great shape who want to continue on the job.”

Officers with 20 years of service or more are eligible to retire at age 50 with a full pension.

Robert Swartzwelder, president of Fraternal Order of Police Fort Pitt Lodge No. 1, said the union had no immediate objection, but he would wait to hear more details before deciding whether to support the bill.

He said that mandatory retirement has forced officers who did not meet the minimum requirements to retire without a pension.

“I've had several members in that category,” he said, noting that the city received state aid to help cover their pensions. “I had one member who had 19 and three-quarter years on the job. They forced him off the job and did not give that member a pension.”

Neither Gilman nor Swartzwelder could immediately provide the number of officers who might benefit.

Gilman said the city needs experienced officers to mentor recruits.

“People who have had decades on the force, who still at this age want to be a police officer, want to serve the residents of the city of Pittsburgh and don't want to go anywhere, why would I want to kick them out the door?” he said “It makes no policy sense.”


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  #493  
Old 02-01-2018, 12:23 PM
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SOUTH KOREA

http://www.koreaherald.com/view.php?ud=20180128000179
Quote:
S. Korea's average retirement age rose to 61.1 in 2017: ministry
Spoiler:
The average retirement age for salaried workers topped 61 years last year as a law raising the retirement age for employees to 60 came into full effect, the labor ministry said Sunday.

A survey by the ministry found that workers were retiring at an average age of 61.1 in 2017, the first year the new law was expanded to affect all companies with more than one employee.

The ministry canvassed 20,000 randomly selected companies with more than one worker from June to November last year.

The government revised the law raising the mandatory retirement age to 60 in May 2013. From 2016, the law affected all companies with more than 300 workers, as well as public organizations.

Since the revision, the average retirement age of salaried workers has increased every year. It rose from 58.8 in 2013 to 59.4 in 2014, 59.8 in 2015 and to 60.3 in 2016. The age went up a further 0.8 year in 2017.

But the ministry pointed out that it needs to come up with measures to improve the effectiveness of the legal retirement age because many private companies still stick to the past practice of demanding their workers take early retirement.

"We will focus our efforts to ensure aged workers are employed in a stable manner till they reach the age of retirement," Kim Kyung-seon, a top ministry official in charge of policy for the aging society, said. (Yonhap)
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  #494  
Old 02-01-2018, 12:26 PM
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PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA
POLICE

http://www.wpxi.com/news/top-stories...-age/689851439
Quote:
City considering pushing back police officers' retirement age
Spoiler:
Target 11 has uncovered a proposal that would raise the retirement age for officers with the Pittsburgh Bureau of Police.

The administration is behind the legislation that will be introduced next week.

It calls for raising the mandatory retirement age to 70.

Pittsburgh police officers are eligible to retire when they reach the age of 50 and have at least 20 years of service; they're required to retire at 65.

The city is planning to introduce legislation that would raise the mandatory retirement age from 65 to 70.

"We have some of our best officers who are in great shape. they're some of our best detectives within homicide, some of our best community relations officers or our neighborhood resource officers who are being forced out and they are simply going to other departments and being great leaders," said Dan Gilman, the mayor's chief of staff.

He said the city is losing qualified officers who aren't ready to retire to other departments.

Channel 11 contacted the police officer's union and the president, Bob Swartzwelder, said, "We have no objection, the impact of increasing the age to 70 is to be determined."
It could have a big impact on younger officers.

"When you think about the next generation of officers coming up, these are the exact men and women who want to mentor them, people who have had decades on the force," Gilman said. "(They) still at this age want to be a police officer, want to serve the residents of the city of Pittsburgh, and don't want to go anywhere. Why would I kick them out the door?"

Officers are required to pass a yearly fitness test.

Swartzwelder told Channel 11 any fitness test for officers staying past 65 would have to be negotiated.


http://triblive.com/local/allegheny/...enced-officers

Quote:
Pittsburgh might increase mandatory retirement age to keep experienced officers
Spoiler:
Pittsburgh intends to raise the mandatory retirement age for police officers to 70, up from 65, so it can retain experienced cops who choose to remain on the job.

City Council will introduce legislation on Tuesday that would change the City Code requirement for police officers to retire at age 65, according to Dan Gilman, Mayor Bill Peduto's chief of staff.

“What's happening now we have some of our best officers who are in great shape... who are being forced out,” Gilman said Friday. “They're simply going to other departments and being great leaders while collecting retirement benefits from the city of Pittsburgh. This legislation in no way forces anyone to stay. It gives the extra five years for those officers who are still in great health and great shape who want to continue on the job.”

Officers with 20 years of service or more are eligible to retire at age 50 with a full pension.

Robert Swartzwelder, president of Fraternal Order of Police Fort Pitt Lodge No. 1, said the union had no immediate objection, but he would wait to hear more details before deciding whether to support the bill.

He said that mandatory retirement has forced officers who did not meet the minimum requirements to retire without a pension.

“I've had several members in that category,” he said, noting that the city received state aid to help cover their pensions. “I had one member who had 19 and three-quarter years on the job. They forced him off the job and did not give that member a pension.”

Neither Gilman nor Swartzwelder could immediately provide the number of officers who might benefit.

Gilman said the city needs experienced officers to mentor recruits.

“People who have had decades on the force, who still at this age want to be a police officer, want to serve the residents of the city of Pittsburgh and don't want to go anywhere, why would I want to kick them out the door?” he said “It makes no policy sense.”
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  #495  
Old 02-01-2018, 12:27 PM
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UNITED KINGDOM
DOCTORS

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/ar...-falls-58.html
Quote:
No wonder you can’t get a GP: Doctors’ average retirement age falls to 58 after nearly 4,000 quit early over the past six years to avoid taxes once their pension pot reaches 1m
Almost two-thirds of family doctors who gave up work were under age of 60
In total, as staggering 4,000 GPs retired before they hit 60 in the last six years
Surgeries from across England are under pressure from an ageing population


Spoiler:
GPs are now retiring at an average age of just 58, official figures reveal today – risking the workforce being left ‘on its knees’.

Almost two-thirds of family doctors who gave up work last year were under the age of 60.

In total, almost 4,000 GPs retired before that age in the last six years – nearly one in ten of the profession.

It is thought many are leaving early to avoid hefty taxes which kick in when their pension pot exceeds 1million.

But some are taking ‘24-hour retirement’ – exploiting a loophole in which they leave for a short period of time and then return as a locum. This enables them to receive their pension payments and a salary at the same time.

Even an average GP earning 100,000 a year who waits until 60 to retire can expect an annual pension of 49,000 and a tax-free lump sum of 147,000.
Surgeries across England are under pressure from the ageing population – with more patients suffering from complex conditions – as well as from migration.

Patients are finding it increasingly difficult to get a routine appointment and many have to wait three to four weeks.

Although the Government has promised to hire an extra 5,000 GPs by 2020, the most recent figures show the workforce is shrinking. An NHS report from November showed it had lost 500 GPs in 12 months, with numbers falling from 41,865 in 2016 to 41,324 in 2017.

The figures on GP retirement were obtained by Pulse magazine from the NHS Business Service Authority, the body in charge of pensions. They showed that the average age for GPs claiming their pension in 2016/17 was 58.52. The age has been steadily falling in the last six years and in 2011/12 it was 60.35. The figures also revealed that 721 of the 1,163 GPs who retired last year – 62 per cent – were below the age of 60.

A total of 3,986 family doctors have retired before the age of 60 in the six years from 2011/12.

Dr Anu Rao, a GP in Shepsted, Leicestershire, who is also medical officer for Leicester, Leicestershire and Rutland Local Medical Committee – a regional body of GPs – said the trend was leaving ‘a struggling GP workforce on its knees.’

She added it created ‘immense pressure on GPs who are trying to make general practice work’.

Rachel Power, chief executive of the Patients Association, said: ‘As demand for healthcare rises, these workforce problems will make acc-essing NHS services ever harder.’


Any GP whose pension pot exceeds 1million is heavily taxed under the Government’s ‘lifetime allowance’ rules. This means it is more economic for high-earning GPs to retire in their 50s. As a comparison, the average private sector worker saves just 24,000 into their pension which pays out 1,200 annually, according to the Office for National Statistics.

Gary Smith, an expert in GP pensions at Tilney Financial Planning, based in London, said: ‘This is making it more financially viable for GPs to retire early rather than remain in the industry until normal retirement age.’

A spokesman for NHS England said: ‘Fortunately recruitment of new doctors to train as GPs is now near record highs, and the NHS is also now hiring top quality international doctors to help replace those local GPs who are taking their pension early and retiring.’


Key reasons why doctors can afford to retire early
One of the key reasons doctors can afford to retire early is their extraordinarily generous pensions.

Typically, doctors on a six-figure salary can expect to receive a pension income of about 50,000 a year at the age of 60.

This is based on their years of service and salary and is paid on top of a cash lump sum of just under 150,000.

GPs can take their pensions before 60 at a reduced rate.

For every year they retire early, the NHS deducts 5 per cent. So if a GP quits at 58 their retirement income might fall from 50,000 to 45,000 and the lump sum from 150,000 to 137,500.

This penalty, which remains in force throughout their retirement, is supposed to keep senior doctors in work.

But experts say it’s having little effect for several reasons.

At its most obvious, early retirement means more leisure time, free of the stress of managing a busy surgery. This becomes extremely tempting when GPs discover the hidden financial perks of leaving full-time employment.

The chronic shortage of locums in the NHS means semi-retired GPs can easily find work a few days a week to boost their incomes. And more importantly, retiring two years early can even make a doctor 118,000 better off, according to Gary Smith, of financial planning firm Tilney.

This is because GPs normally pay 14 per cent of their salary into the NHS pension scheme every year. As soon as they retire these payments stop. So someone who left a 100,000 post at the age of 58 would save two years of pension contributions – or 28,000.

Additionally, they would have collected 90,000 from their pension plan without paying any National Insurance. The benefit of instead working full-time until the age of 60 (other than the high salary) would have been an extra 5,000 a year in retirement and a 12,500 lump sum.

Yet it would take more than 20 years of receiving these extra payments to make up for the cash the early retiree would have collected.

The final incentive for GPs to retire early is the potential tax blow they face.

In the eyes of the taxman, a 50,000 pension income and 150,000 lump sum from the NHS is equal to a 1.15 million pension pot in the private sector.

This is above the lifetime limit for pension saving. Under tax rules, workers face a penal charge of between 25 per cent and 55 per cent on anything above 1 million.

According to Mr Smith at Tilney, the effect would be to reduce a 60-year-old GP’s pension income to 48,125 a year.


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  #496  
Old 02-01-2018, 12:29 PM
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INDIA

https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/...w/62656821.cms

Quote:
Retirement age for doctors raised to 65
Spoiler:
AHMEDABAD: The retirement age of central government doctors has been raised to 65 years. The Union government issued a gazette notification to this effect on January 5.
The government notification stated that the age of superannuation in respect of general duty medical officers and specialists included in teaching, non-teaching and public health sub-cadres of the central health service, AYUSH doctors, civilian doctors under the directorate general of armed forces medical services, medical officers of Indian ordnance factories health services, dental doctors working under the ministry of health and family welfare, doctors of Indian Railways medical service and dental doctors under the ministry of railways, doctors of general duty medical officers sub-cadre of central armed police forces and Assam Rifles and specialist medical officers of central armed police forces and Assam Rifles shall be sixty-five years.
The age for retirement was 62 years. Bipin Patel former president of Gujarat Medical Association said this was the long pending demand of the association, but the government has not been implementing the same.

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  #497  
Old 02-01-2018, 12:29 PM
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UKRAINE

https://www.ukrinform.net/rubric-eco...ten-years.html

Quote:
Social Policy Minister: No need to raise retirement age in Ukraine in next ten years
Spoiler:
There will be no need for raising the retirement age in Ukraine in next 10 years.
Ukrainian Social Policy Minister Andriy Reva said this in an interview with the Obozrevatel media outlet.

"When at least 90-95 percent of people work legally, we will say: ‘Stop! We have no more reserves.’ We consider that there will be no need for raising the retirement age in the next ten years. Afterwards, such a problem can theoretically arise, and we will decide what to do," he said.

As reported, Reva said earlier that the International Monetary Fund had suggested to raise the retirement age for Ukrainians to solve the problem of deficit of the Pension Fund of Ukraine, trying to follow the same methods it used in other states. At the same time, the minister stressed that the Ukrainian side had proposed to solve the problem through the implementation of the pension reform without increasing the retirement age for citizens.


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  #498  
Old 02-16-2018, 05:09 PM
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JAPAN

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/20.../#.Woc3vKinGUk

Quote:
Health ministry OKs plan to hike pension collection age to 71
Spoiler:
The government on Friday approved an outline for raising the optional age for tapping public pensions to 71 or older to address the national labor shortage stemming from Japan’s falling birthrate and rapidly graying population.

The ministry will consider revising the related laws in fiscal 2020 to encourage people in their 60s or older to continue working.

The ministry’s outline notes that older adults are physically healthier than previous generations and are highly motivated to continue working or participate in community activities.

In addition, the outline says the government will review the “standardization of life stages according to age categories.”

“Depopulation in rural areas is expected as the pace of aging picks up. It is important to realize a society where people of all generations can widely and actively participate,” Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said during a meeting on the issue Friday.

After studying next year’s pension financing, the ministry plans to design a new system in a more concrete manner.

By law, one’s pension can be tapped at any time between 60 and 70. If a person chooses to start receiving his or her pension after their 65th birthday, their monthly payments are raised. But this scheme is not widely used.

“We will earnestly consider expanding options,” health minister Katsunobu Kato told a news conference.

But Kato ruled out the possibility of the pension collection age, which is currently set at 65 in principle, being hiked uniformly.

The government is looking to back the idea of companies raising their retirement ages or extending post-retirement employment.

It will also consider providing support for people who start their own businesses and promote telecommuting.

The government will also support the development of advanced technologies, such as automated driving systems and nursing robots, to help the elderly work.

The outline, which is reviewed roughly every five years, also set a range of numerical targets. These include goals to reduce the number of drivers 80 or older killed in traffic accidents to below 200 by 2020, compared with 266 in 2016, and raise the employment rate for people between 60 and 64 to 67.0 percent by 2020, compared with the current 63.6 percent.
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Old 02-16-2018, 05:10 PM
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PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA
POLICE

http://www.post-gazette.com/local/ci...s/201802140145

Quote:
Pittsburgh City Council gives preliminary OK for extending retirement age for police
Spoiler:
Pittsburgh City Council on Wednesday pushed forward a bill that would raise the mandatory retirement age for police officers from 65 to 70.

A final vote is expected next week on the legislation, which would give the dozens of officers who will hit retirement age by 2023 an option to stay for five more years.

The council approved the measure in a preliminary vote after a lively hourlong discussion about the financial impact of the legislation, including what it would do to pension and health care funds.

Abstaining from the vote were council members Theresa Kail-Smith and Corey O'Connor, who requested more information about finances.

Before the discussion, the council heard an emotional testimony from longtime city Detective Thomas Wager, who held back tears while talking about his recent forced retirement.

"I started in 2000. I took well over a 50 percent pay cut to take this job," Mr. Wager said. "I didn't do it for the money. I did it because i wanted to be a police officer and wanted to serve the city where I live. I would just ask you that you give me the chance to continue serving in that capacity."

Over the hour of talks, the council pressed Police Chief Scott Schubert, Public Safety Director Wendell Hissrich and Chief Financial Officer Sam Ashbaugh on the potential effects of raising the retirement age.

Mr. Ashbaugh said he is "very comfortable [the bill] will not have a financial impact on the city," adding that he has seen no evidence that it will change salaries, health benefits or pensions in a substantial way.

The council also heard from Officer Robert Swartzwelder, president of the Fraternal Order of Police Fort Pitt Lodge No. 1, who said the union is "neutral" on the bill.
http://www.post-gazette.com/opinion/...s/201802280018

Quote:
Serving until 70?: Consider higher mandatory retirement age for cops
Spoiler:
The city of Pittsburgh long has been concerned about a wave of retirements decimating the ranks of the 900-member police bureau. If some officers want to stay beyond 65, the mandatory retirement age now in place, it might make sense to keep them on. Public Safety Director Wendell Hissrich’s proposal to let officers stay until 70 is worth a look.

By the time they’re in their 60s, city police have had the opportunity to see and do it all. They’re likely to have worked in various zones and served in various roles, gaining knowledge, experience and street smarts even the brightest new recruits will lack. It seems a waste to dispense with all of that just because of a 65th birthday, especially when the loss of dozens of senior officers by 2023 may tax recruitment efforts and the bureau regularly loses a certain number of younger members to suburban departments thought to have better working conditions. If older officers “want to stay here, why not keep them here in the city,” Mr. Hissrich said, “and keep their experience and their knowledge and their training here in the city? That’s what’s behind this.”

It’s trite to say people are living longer these days. More important, many are able-bodied and clear-headed deep into retirement. Pennsylvania voters in 2016 approved a referendum allowing judges to stay on the bench an additional five years, until they’re 75. Because they have a career-long incentive to stay fit and sharp, many police officers also are well-suited to remain on the job past 65.

Of course, the city must weigh the financial impact of letting the most senior, highest-paid officers remain on duty for an additional five years. Mayor Bill Peduto wants to have the city removed from state financial oversight. The elimination of monitoring and an increase in the mandatory retirement age for police could set the stage for salary and benefit spikes to be foisted on taxpayers.

There’s also the potential impact on the city pension fund, which only eight years ago was at risk of a state takeover because of severe under-funding. A longer time on the job, at an increasing rate of pay, translates into fatter pensions and a greater fund liability. The city must not get in over its head again.

Even if Mr. Hissrich’s proposal makes financial sense, there are other considerations to work through before officers are invited to stick around. Those electing to stay on the job should have to demonstrate their fitness. The city also must promise to deploy them for real police work, not relegate them to the desk-bound bureaucracy where they’re neither heard nor seen.

The point is that they be heard and seen, with the city making maximum use of these officers’ expertise. At 69, even the fittest officers may be hard-pressed to chase down suspects in their 20s. But they would make excellent candidates for neighborhood beat patrols and specialty units, and the city might assign its oldest officers to work with its youngest in a special mentorship program designed to facilitate knowledge transfer.

As Pittsburgh experiences an exciting period of growth and change, it’s good to have veteran police officers provide stability. Mr. Hissrich may be on to something.
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Old 02-16-2018, 05:12 PM
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STUNT PERFORMERS
http://deadline.com/2018/02/sag-aftr...an-1202283602/

Quote:
SAG-AFTRA Board To Hear Proposal To Lower Stunt Performers’ Full Retirement Age
Spoiler:
Hollywood’s stunt performers — whose careers, like those of professional athletes, tend to decline after a certain age — have been lobbying the SAG Pension Plan, without success, for decades to allow them to retire with full benefits at age 55. They can currently take early retirement at that age but with a 30% reduction in pension benefits.

RelatedStuntwoman's Federal Push To End 'Wigging' Shakes Up Male-Dominated Industry
At its meeting this weekend, SAG-AFTRA’s national board of directors is expected to take up the issue in response to a resolution approved at the union’s convention in October, which urged the board to recommend to the Pension Plan’s trustees that they provide full pensions at age 55 to all members – like stunt performers and dancers – who work in physically taxing professions. In the past, however, the pension trustees have said that doing so would cost the Plan too much money.


The latest push to lower the full retirement age for stunt performers comes at a time of renewed concern about their welfare following the union’s establishment of a Blue Ribbon Commission on Safety in the wake of the deaths of stunt performers last year on The Walking Dead and Deadpool 2. In the end, however, the decision to lower their full retirement age will be up to the Pension Plan’s trustees, even if the SAG-AFTRA board votes this weekend to adopt the convention delegates’ resolution.

SAG board minutes show that the issue has been debated since the 1980s, when it was noted that “there are in the stunt community a lot of performers who have reached their late 40s and 50s who are unable to work anymore because of the accumulation of injuries over the years – not one specific traumatic event that has made them disabled, but an accumulation over the years that has been enough to make it very difficult for them to work, or not work at all. And that is why you had the stunt community lobby over the years to allow stunt performers to retire at age 55 with full pension, and which has never been adopted.”

The issue came up again in 1997. Back then, famed stuntman Dick Warlock, whose more than 200 credits include stunt coordinator on the second and third Halloween films, urged the Plan to lower the full retirement age to 55. “Stunt people use and abuse their bodies in the same manner as any other sports figure does,” he wrote in a letter to Bruce Dow, who then was CEO of the SAG Pension & Health Plans. “I feel as though I can still perform as I did when I was 20,” but he added that “to think this way is only fooling myself. As a stunt performer, I need my full bag of tricks, and let’s face it: At that age we can still ride in a car or throw a punch, but to get down and do it like when we were 20 is almost totally out of the question.

RelatedStunt Performers Rally For Inclusion At Oscars
“I wear hearing aids due to the gunfire and explosions that I’ve encountered in the past 37 years of working in this business,” he wrote back in 1997, when he was 57. “I have a separated shoulder as well as knee damage. I’m actually pretty well off physically, compared to some of my contemporaries. I don’t know what impact this would have on the Plan as a whole, but it would probably be pretty minimal. Mr. Dow, we need this put into effect ASAP and we need your help to do it.”

Earlier that year, SAG’s board asked the Plan’s trustees to study the impact of full retirement benefits at age 55 for stunt performers and coordinators, but after looking into it, Dow told the guild that “the trustees were concerned with the equity of providing more liberal benefits only to certain limited groups of participants. Such an action could set a precedent for other groups to request preferential treatment based on their specific needs, and it would be extremely difficult to deny one group’s request while approving another’s. For example, women with advancing age many times find reduced employment opportunities because of the limited roles available.”

Child actors, he wrote, “are another group who may also have shortened careers,” as are dancers.

RelatedSAG Awards Stunt Ensemble Winners: ‘Wonder Woman’ & ‘Game Of Thrones’
“If all these groups were included,” Dow wrote, “the cost of such a provision would not be affordable to the Plans.” In designing benefits, Dow told the guild, the trustees “have limited funds available for benefit improvements, and therefore must consider the needs of all the participants will benefit from the Plan’s provisions. In any event, the current financial condition of the Plan would not allow for such a change at this time.”

Like all members of the union, stunt performers are eligible to receive a full disability pension if they are under 65 and can prove that they are totally disabled; or an occupational disability pension if they are younger than 65 and can prove that their disability occurred during the course of employment covered by the Plan, including a disability caused by an injury that occurred during production, at an audition or rehearsal, or during travel to or from location.

Not everyone who applies for an occupational disability pension gets one, however — including Warlock, who turned 78 on Monday. He told Deadline that he was denied such a pension when he was 55 even though he says he suffered disabling injuries while on the job. “I asked for occupational disability and they turned me down,” he said. “I have a busted knee and a shoulder that’s so bad they won’t operate on it. I hurt it on Rollerball, when I was knocked out for three days, and I re-injured it on The Relic, when I was suspended from wires and they jerked me into a table and blew out my shoulder a second time.”

He said he’s grateful to the union for providing him with a reduced early pension – for which he said he receives about $1,900 a month – but remains bitter about the Plan’s denial of his full occupational disability pension. “The union sucks as far as I’m concerned, and as far as stunt people are concerned,” he said.
http://www.benefitspro.com/2018/02/1...retirement-age
Quote:
Stunt performers seek lower full retirement age
Spoiler:
The Screen Actors Guild Pension Plan is being urged to consider lowering the full retirement age for all members of SAG-AFTRA [Screen Actors Guild‐American Federation of Television and Radio Artists] who work in physically demanding professions, such as stunt performers and dancers.

Stunt performers have been lobbying for such an action for decades, according to a Deadline report, without any luck.


They can currently retire early at 55, but that will cost them a 30 percent reduction in benefits; what they’re hoping for is full retirement at 55 because of the physical demands their professions make on their ability to work.

The new push to win over the pension plan comes after the deaths of two stunt performers on the sets of The Walking Dead and Deadpool 2.

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But even if the SAG-AFTRA board votes to adopt the convention delegates’ resolution decision to lower their full retirement age, in the end it will be up to the pension plan’s trustees.

But it doesn’t look good.

The report quotes SAG board minutes that indicate ongoing debate about the issue since the 1980s, when it was noted that “there are in the stunt community a lot of performers who have reached their late 40s and 50s who are unable to work anymore because of the accumulation of injuries over the years—not one specific traumatic event that has made them disabled, but an accumulation over the years that has been enough to make it very difficult for them to work, or not work at all. And that is why you had the stunt community lobby over the years to allow stunt performers to retire at age 55 with full pension, and which has never been adopted.”

In 1997 there was more debate about the full retirement age, with the then-CEO of the SAG Pension & Health Plans, Bruce Dow, replying that the trustees argued against it lest it open the door for other groups of performers to claim retirement early—such as women faced with limited roles as they aged and child actors also facing shortened careers.

And that, the trustees argued, would cost the plan too much money.

While stunt performers are eligible for a full disability pension if they are under 65 and can prove that they are totally disabled, or an occupational disability pension if they are younger than 65 and can prove that their disability occurred during the course of employment covered by the Plan, including a disability caused by an injury that occurred during production, at an audition or rehearsal, or during travel to or from location, the report says, not everyone who applies is granted an occupational disability pension.
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