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  #41  
Old 01-21-2002, 05:10 PM
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Quote:
On 2002-01-21 15:29, Funktuary wrote:
To Techguy:
If you're getting into this field to impress the ladies, you're certainly barking up the wrong tree.
Like I didn't know that already? Maybe I didn't pick a good comparison ... because the cretazoic geologists probably have something actually interesting to say about what they do, like stories about climbing down a volcano.
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  #42  
Old 01-22-2002, 10:45 AM
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Ok, now that we've beaten the exam subject almost to death, what about the work itself? What is there about the work that makes you sick, and what about the work is very satisfying?
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  #43  
Old 01-24-2002, 10:33 PM
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Quote:
On 2002-01-22 10:45, techguy wrote:
Ok, now that we've beaten the exam subject almost to death, what about the work itself? What is there about the work that makes you sick, and what about the work is very satisfying?
I think you'll find that the answer depends alot on what area the answerer works in. I believe you expressed an interest in pension, which I don't know much about. But, I can tell you about life valuation - my personal hell.

Pathogens:

1. Constantly changing standards for valuing products - just when you master one technique, the fiddlers at the top send down a new ultimatum. Truly a full employment act for actuaries at work here.

2. The scourge of the black box - valuation software is not intuitive, poorly written, and frequently error prone, and basically unaccessible to the average actuary.

3. The invisible customer - you bust your hump for some regulator/auditor somewhere who demonstrates his anal retentiveness / general ignorance / power complex by asking you inane questions, when the reality is that unless the geniuses running the show are selling 1 year GICS and backing them with 20 year bonds your company will never go belly up, at least in this century.

4. New York. Enough said.

Cures:

1. Without exception, I have worked with a genuinely great bunch of people over the last fifteen years.

2. For a few months out of the year, there isn't a whole lot to do, providing a window of opportunity for innovation.

3. The money is obscenely generous considering the overall effort.

As for your age, I'd say it's not as important as your other life commitments. I think you said you are unattached and have no children. Perfect. Anklebiters have a way of making you severely resent the time commitment required to pass exams. Try not to procreate until you have your ASA. Your mental disposition will be much better for it.

I say go for it. Good luck!

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  #44  
Old 01-29-2002, 09:09 PM
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Ok, here's the plan. Course 2 this November, Course 3 in May 2003. Get an actuarial type job in mid to late 2003. Achieve ASA by May 2006.

Sounds realistic?
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  #45  
Old 01-30-2002, 08:10 AM
DW Simpson DW Simpson is offline
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It's realistic if you put other sittings completely out of your head and focus on the November sitting. Too many people take an exam while looking ahead to the next one, only to end up failing their current sitting.

http://www.casact.org/students/examstatsum.pdf has the exam passing percentages. They're low because they're ridiculously hard.
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  #46  
Old 01-31-2002, 09:04 AM
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Quote:
On 2002-01-30 08:10, D.W. Simpson Webmaster wrote:

http://www.casact.org/students/examstatsum.pdf has the exam passing percentages. They're low because they're ridiculously hard.
Thanks for the link. The failure rate is bad, but it doesn't look any worse than what they were back when I did the 100 and 110.

Of course, when I'm actually preparing for the exams I'll take them one at a time and not worry about the next one until it comes. But I still need to bear my medium to long-term goals in mind, as I have always done in life, so I will either accomplish them or realize that it's not worth it (e.g. if I was expecting 10 years to ASA I wouldn't bother with it, given that I already earn what an ASA would earn).

Starting in November 2002 and finishing in May 2006 gives me 8 sittings in which to pass 5. Naturally I would hope to never fail anything and will work towards doing that, but it would be overconfident to predict doing that at this point in time.
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