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  #21  
Old 02-25-2018, 06:27 PM
Westley Westley is offline
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Originally Posted by Colonel Smoothie View Post
I ate lunch with clarinetist once. You should take him up on the offer.

10/10 would lunch again, imo
Wow. Just for OP's comparison purposes, I put my best foot forward and got 6/10, might lunch again if close by and Westley was paying.
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  #22  
Old 02-26-2018, 04:56 PM
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mathmajor mathmajor is offline
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It took me over a year from graduation to job offer. Here are my mistakes:

-Only looked in hometown
-Just had one exam
-Knew basic C++ but no SQL, VBA. Limited MATLAB.
-No internships or relevant work experience
-Bad at interviewing, limited industry knowledge

All that being said, I got lucky. And ended up being a "superstar." I interview much better now; 2 for 2 in getting an offer from my first interview.

So yeah. Check out analyst ads and note the programming languages. Get good at them, but more importantly, do a tangible, complicated project. One you can talk about.

Interviewing skills: intern/EL interviews are painful because of having nothing to talk about. The above step will remedy that. But ask really good questions. Not just getting to know the company/department, but research issues in (healthcare, life insurance, whatever) and get the interviewee's take.

Trust me, I've done enough of these. You will impress everyone by asking a good question. Also, sell yourself. Tell us what skills you have that are applicable.

EL is less of a 2-way street than experienced. Once you get letters, you can be selective and the company should sell to you as well.

Lastly, remember if you get a job, you still have to DO the job. All day every day. Make sure it's something you can really do.
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  #23  
Old 02-26-2018, 08:57 PM
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Colonel Smoothie Colonel Smoothie is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mathmajor View Post
It took me over a year from graduation to job offer. Here are my mistakes:

-Only looked in hometown
-Just had one exam
-Knew basic C++ but no SQL, VBA. Limited MATLAB.
-No internships or relevant work experience
-Bad at interviewing, limited industry knowledge

All that being said, I got lucky. And ended up being a "superstar." I interview much better now; 2 for 2 in getting an offer from my first interview.

So yeah. Check out analyst ads and note the programming languages. Get good at them, but more importantly, do a tangible, complicated project. One you can talk about.

Interviewing skills: intern/EL interviews are painful because of having nothing to talk about. The above step will remedy that. But ask really good questions. Not just getting to know the company/department, but research issues in (healthcare, life insurance, whatever) and get the interviewee's take.

Trust me, I've done enough of these. You will impress everyone by asking a good question. Also, sell yourself. Tell us what skills you have that are applicable.

EL is less of a 2-way street than experienced. Once you get letters, you can be selective and the company should sell to you as well.

Lastly, remember if you get a job, you still have to DO the job. All day every day. Make sure it's something you can really do.
I don't really see the bullet points you laid out as "mistakes." The way I see it, you simply got a late start and weren't gung-ho on the profession when you were 18. From what I've seen, the more successful actuaries have taken the same exact steps you have, but they just started earlier.
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Originally Posted by Wigmeister General View Post
Don't you even think about sending me your resume. I'll turn it into an origami boulder and return it to you.
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