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  #1  
Old 06-23-2004, 10:59 AM
sdcourse2 sdcourse2 is offline
 
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Default help!!!!!

I have an interview with the actuary i will work with if hired. Any suggestions on the kind of questions i can expect. This is my first and only interview with this company. And the position is entry level. Thanks in advance!
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Old 06-23-2004, 11:07 AM
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Try Here.
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Old 06-23-2004, 11:23 AM
sdcourse2 sdcourse2 is offline
 
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!!!.
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Old 06-23-2004, 11:25 AM
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My point was that the question has been asked several times before. Do a little homework before you ask others to answer a question for the 20th time.
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Old 06-23-2004, 11:40 AM
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Woodrow Woodrow is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sdcourse4
Thanks for taking the effort to post the link!!! I was actually hoping to hear some useful advice.
Here's some advice:
Treat the interviewer with more respect than you are showing here.

Now, would you like to try again? You don't get to start over in an interview, but you can here.
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Old 06-23-2004, 11:54 AM
Westley Westley is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sdcourse4
Thanks for taking the effort to post the link!!! I was actually hoping to hear some useful advice.
You already did.

But, I often bitch about people asking repetitive questions when they are starting out, and I never explain why, so allow me to address this (yes, this is useful career advice coming up, bear with me).

I rarely hire somebody to do something that I can't do - I can pretty much do everything that my department needs. I've been around, seen enough, my computer skills are still good enough, I am still up on legal issues, and I can run all the calculations you need. If I could get 10 more of me, and pay them a lot less than I make, I would do that. But, I can't, so I am considering hiring you. You don't have special skills, special knowledge, etc. But, if you are willing, you might be able to do some of the work that I need done that I am able to parcel out; this will allow me to focus on the stuff that cannot easily be given away, or which I must do for some reason (client relationship, special knowledge, whatever).

OK, here's the advice: you are of no use to me as an employee if you act like your time is more valuable than mine, because it's not. Your job is to make my life easier by taking away from me whatever you are able to do, it doesn't matter if it takes you longer than it does me. And, if you do this well for a while, you'll make good money at it, and you'll eventually know as much as me, which is a lot.

If you are interested in having me do stuff for you just because it's faster, I'll end up with more than I can do, and you won't end up with enough. You won't learn that much, and you won't be worth the paycheck (which is a moo point, because you will no longer be collecting it).

Do your own research if your question is completely basic and then come back and I'll be glad to help clarify the part that is still unclear.

Hey, claude, maybe you want to link to this thread for people that ask repetitive questions?
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Old 06-23-2004, 04:01 PM
sdcourse2 sdcourse2 is offline
 
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This is the main reason i don't post on message boards. I hit submit when i just wanted to hit preview, and then change the post, to say I already did the search, and all i wanted was some new comments. I apologize if i hurt anybody's feelings. I know what I ask seems like a repeat question to most people, but the questions I came across were mostly hr type questions, and I was wondering how technical mine would get.
Thanks Westley!
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Old 06-23-2004, 04:22 PM
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Oh, ok. Then try here.


But in all seriousness, it is much better to have the actuary asking you the questions. HR people don't know what to expect- they can't answer any of your questions. You can go more deeply into it with the actuary. Of course, all actuaries are different, so I can't really tell you what to expect. If they are older, expect that they won't know what the exam process is like now, and so you might get some questions about exams and they might not have even heard of the redesign. Don't be mad if he/she asks you easy questions you think they should know. It's been a while since they have been in the process.
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Old 06-24-2004, 07:35 PM
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I know there are tonnes of threads about interview questions. And tonnes of threads about consulting vs non-consulting.

BUT I still have a question about these combined together since I couldn't find something that answers my question (or I'm just hopeless with the search function).

As an entry-level candidate with no experience in the field, I hardly have much knowledge about the industry (as Westley stated) but what do consulting actuaries look for in these candidates compared to non-consulting actuaries? Do the non-consulting ones look for higher programming skills (say it's for a product development position) while as consulting ones look for higher communication skills? Or do they have almost the same set of criteria?
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Old 06-24-2004, 07:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Apollyon
I know there are tonnes of threads about interview questions. And tonnes of threads about consulting vs non-consulting.

BUT I still have a question about these combined together since I couldn't find something that answers my question (or I'm just hopeless with the search function).

As an entry-level candidate with no experience in the field, I hardly have much knowledge about the industry (as Westley stated) but what do consulting actuaries look for in these candidates compared to non-consulting actuaries? Do the non-consulting ones look for higher programming skills (say it's for a product development position) while as consulting ones look for higher communication skills? Or do they have almost the same set of criteria?
What a great way to ask - you researched, you didn't find everything, can somebody answer this specific question that's still not clear - this a great approach.

I am sure that there will be other views, none of which are exactly right or wrong, but here's my 1/50th of a dollar:

Consultants require good communication skills; non-consulting, the bar is a little lower. Consulting jobs do not have regular hours - you can work really late for a week, be slow for a while, then busy for a couple days, it's fairly random. So, they seek people that are willing/able to tolerate that type of schedule. Consultants generally do more interesting and more varied work (I don't think this applies to pension consulting as much as to life, health, and P/C consulting), and so they will be looking for somebody that gets excited about that. If you are on either end of the scale on exams, it might be easier to find a job in an insurance company: a consultant is unlikely to take a chance on somebody with no exams, and on the top end, they won't get as excited as an insurance company. That is, if you graduate with 4 or 5 exams, an insurance company will be all over that, but a consultant will still require good communication, good computer skills, etc, whereas an insurer might get so excited about the exams, they just don't care that mjuch about the rest.
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