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  #1  
Old 09-17-2006, 01:40 PM
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Default Free H. Beatty Chadwick!

So this guy was found in contempt of court during divorce proceedings and has served 11 years on that charge. He will not give up $2.5M the court thinks he has. He says he lost it all. Nobody can find the $$.

The kicker is that the maximum term for stealing $2.5M is 7 years in prison.

Anyway, I say let him go. there has to be some point at which the punishment is cruel or unusual.

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AFTER more than a decade behind bars, H. Beatty Chadwick can claim to be America’s most stubborn ex-husband.

The former lawyer has served 11 years in jail for contempt of court in a civil case because he will not tell his ex-wife what happened to the money in their divorce.

Chadwick, 68, from Philadelphia, appeared in court again on Tuesday in shackles, but he is still refusing to say what happened to $2.5 million (1.4 million) he allegedly hid in offshore bank accounts.

He has served more than the maximum seven-year sentence he could have received if he had just stolen the money outright.
His lawyer, Michael Malloy, said that Chadwick, who could walk free any time he decided to co-operate, was neither mentally ill nor particularly eccentric.

He said it was a tragedy that his client had spent so long behind bars, noting that he had two sons from his first marriage who were ready to take him in.

“The whole issue is, ‘What the hell are you doing in here for contempt for ten years?’,” Mr Malloy said. “It’s almost like a Monty Python sketch.”
Chadwick’s second wife, Barbara Jean “Bobbie” Chadwick, who is 18 years his junior, has described their lifestyle as “extravagant by almost everyone else’s understanding of what life is like”.

She said theirs was once a lifestyle of luxurious homes, manicured lawns, 5 o’clock cocktail hours, full-course dinners by candlelight and classical music. She has also called him a control freak who kept her on an allowance of $600 a month and made her clean the swimming pool and mow the 3-acre lawn at their palatial home.

“I ended up making all my clothing. I lived what looked like an opulent life, but I did it on a very tiny little budget,” she said.

She said they had sex according to a strict schedule on Tuesday and Thursday mornings at 7.30, with no variation. The final straw in their 20-year marriage came when he demanded that she ration her use of lavatory paper to six sheets a visit.

Mrs Chadwick, an artist, is now living in Maine under another name and did not attend the hearing. “She’s pleased that she’s not married to him any more,” her lawyer said. “She’s getting tired of it [the case], but watching it.”

Chadwick went on the run after a divorce hearing in November 1994, but was captured when a dental assistant recognised him from a magazine article and told police.

He was arrested by two plainclothes officers in the dentist’s chair on April 5, 1995, as he kept a 7am cleaning appointment. But he put up a fight and had to be restrained.

He has spent the past 11 years in the Delaware County Prison, where he runs the law library, but is sometimes locked in his cell for 22 hours a day. An investigation has shown that Chadwick transferred the missing money through a company in Gibraltar. An expert witness testified that the $2.5 million would be worth more than $8 million today. But Mr Chadwick insists that he lost it all in a European property venture.

Last year a court-appointed official strongly recommended that Chadwick be released after the authorities had failed to find the money.
Soon afterwards, however, prison officials discovered a letter to Chadwick from a lawyer friend offering help in “starting up your numbered account in the Caymans”.
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article...100914,00.html
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Old 09-17-2006, 01:55 PM
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If he really is lying (as suggested by the letter regarding the Cayman account), then the crime is still ongoing. Why should the punishment stop before the crime does?
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Old 09-17-2006, 02:00 PM
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Why should the punishment stop before the crime does?
Lots of reasons
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Old 09-17-2006, 02:01 PM
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So many they exceeded the character limit of your post? Ask Tom to raise it for you - I'm sure he won't mind.
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Old 09-17-2006, 02:04 PM
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The maximum penalty for stealing 2.5 million is almost certainly 7 years plus restitution. I don't know what would happen if the court were convinced he could make restitution but won't. That might be a relevant factor here.
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Old 09-17-2006, 03:23 PM
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So many they exceeded the character limit of your post? Ask Tom to raise it for you - I'm sure he won't mind.
I'll jump right on it.
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Old 09-17-2006, 03:24 PM
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Chadwick is not exactly a poster child for "people being treated unjustly by the system." Let him rot.
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Old 09-17-2006, 03:56 PM
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Chadwick is not exactly a poster child for "people being treated unjustly by the system." Let him rot.
Admittedly, I haven't found lots of "Chadwick Defense fund" websites or "Chadwick is innocent" activists.
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Old 09-17-2006, 04:00 PM
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I guess my real problem is, the officials don't really know if he has the money. Maybe he doesn't. Maybe he has been in jail for 11 years for no reason. I wouldn't be surprised if he does know where the money is. But shouldn't there be some point at which he gets out?

Is it OK for a man to spend life in prison because he says one thing and people don't believe him? Isn't there burden of proof? Shouldn't there be a statute of limitations, even for ongoing investigations?

I know there is much more to this case and IANAL.

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Old 09-17-2006, 04:07 PM
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I suspect he has not given them the information to track the money. If he lost it all in a European property venture, should there not be records?
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